Lucy Letby Trial: Three colleagues of nurse say they did NOT administer insulin to alleged victim

Three colleagues of Lucy Letby say they did NOT administer insulin to baby said to have been poisoned by the neonatal nurse

  • Three ex-colleagues of Lucy Letby say they never gave insulin to alleged victim
  • A court heard the nurses were working alongside Letby when the baby collapsed
  • Jurors were told she attacked Baby F less than 24 hours after she killed his twin 
  • Letby denies seven charges of murder and ten counts of attempted murder

Three former colleagues of neonatal nurse Lucy Letby told a court today that they had never administered insulin to an infant she is alleged to have poisoned.

Each of the nurses was asked the question in succession as they came to the end of their evidence about the care of Baby F while he was at the Countess of Chester Hospital in August 2015.

Shelley Tomlin, Sophie Ellis and Belinda Williamson were all working alongside Letby, 32, around the time the infant collapsed.

The prosecution at Manchester Crown Court alleges that Letby attacked Baby F with insulin less than 24 hours after murdering his twin brother, Baby E, with an injection of air.

She later went salsa dancing with another off-duty nurse from the neonatal unit.

Medical staff on the unit managed to revive Baby F and he was later transferred to another hospital.

Three former colleagues of Lucy Letby told a court they had never given insulin to a baby she is accused of poisoning. Pictured: Lucy Letby holding a cocktail on a night out 

It is alleged that the nurse tried to kill Baby F less than 24 hours after his twin brothr Baby E was murdered. Pictured: Lucy Letby at a concert

It is alleged that the nurse tried to kill Baby F less than 24 hours after his twin brothr Baby E was murdered. Pictured: Lucy Letby at a concert

A picture shown to the jury of the neonatal ward where Letby worked at the Countess of Chester Hospital

A picture shown to the jury of the neonatal ward where Letby worked at the Countess of Chester Hospital

He would have gone earlier – ahead of the alleged attack – had transport been available.

Nick Johnson, KC, prosecuting, has told the jury that it had simply not occurred to staff that someone might have injected him or any other infant on the neonatal unit with insulin.

Miss Tomlins gave evidence via a video link to Australia, Sophie Ellis from behind a screen in the Manchester courtroom.

The third nurse, shift leader Belinda Williamson, also gave evidence from behind a screen while Letby sat in the glass-panelled dock.

Miss Tomlins told the court she recalled a new TPN intravenous feed bag being set up for Baby E after a longline tube needed to be replaced because it had ’tissued’.

This would have come from the padlocked fridge on the unit. Nurses had access to bespoke TPN bags for individual babies and stock bags for more general use or where there was no time to wait for a bespoke bag.

The bespoke bags lasted for either 24 hours or 48 hours, but seven years on from the incident she couldn’t remember which.

Asked what type of feed bag would have been used on August 4, Miss Tomlins replied: ‘It would depend on whether there were any more bags made up for him.

‘If we had run out I assume we would have just attached to one of our stock bags and ordered more for him. It took a few hours for them to come from the pharmacy’.

She said the keys to both the fridge and the cupboards in Nursery 1 where drugs, insulin and intubation kits were kept together on the same bunch.

Asked by Simon Driver, prosecuting, who had possession of this, she replied: ‘Usually the nurse in charge, but any one of us could ask for the bunch of keys and forget we had it in our pocket’.

She did not think a log was kept of who had the keys at any particular time.

Insulin was kept in the cupboards in Nursery 1, along with controlled drugs and the drugs needed for the intubation kits.

Mr Astbury put one final question to her, asking: ‘Did you mat any point administer insulin to Baby F’.

She replied: ‘No’.

Miss Tomlins agreed with Ben Myers, KC, defending, that there was nothing unusual in a nurse signing on computer records for tasks that had actually been completed by a colleague.

The neonatal nurse, 32, is accused of murdering seven babies and trying to kill anothr ten at the Countess of Chester Hospital. Pictured: Lucy Letby dressed in her work uniform holding a baby

The neonatal nurse, 32, is accused of murdering seven babies and trying to kill anothr ten at the Countess of Chester Hospital. Pictured: Lucy Letby dressed in her work uniform holding a baby

Letby is said to have intentionally added insulin to Baby F's intravenous feed bag on August 5, 2015. Pictured: Lucy Letby holding a cocktail on a night out

Letby is said to have intentionally added insulin to Baby F’s intravenous feed bag on August 5, 2015. Pictured: Lucy Letby holding a cocktail on a night out

A general view of the Countess of Chester Hospital, where nurse Lucy Letby used to work

A general view of the Countess of Chester Hospital, where nurse Lucy Letby used to work

‘It wasn’t strictly enforced,’ she said. ‘The ‘user’ simply means you’re the one that is signed onto the system’.

Mr Myers: ‘So you can’t tell who has actually administered, can you?’

The nurse: ‘No’.

Asked about the keys, she said they might happen to be with the last person who had gone to the fridge.

‘Sometimes you had to ask around. You just used to say ‘Who’s got the keys?’ You would not necessarily say where you were going with them, but it would be the fridge or the cupboard.

‘They kept intubation kits in the fridge. These contained drugs that were needed so they were ready and you could get on with it’.

She said two nurses would check that a new TPN bag had been connected correctly, but it might be set up by a single nurse. If it was a prescribed bag, one nurse would sign the paperwork.

Letby, originally from Hereford, denies the murders of seven babies and the attempted murders of 10 others between June 2015 and June 2016.

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