Lucy Mecklenburgh reveals her daughter Lilah, 2 months, was hospitalised with bronchiolitis

Lucy Mecklenburgh reveals her daughter Lilah, 2 months, was hospitalised with bronchiolitis and was given oxygen – as star shares her gratitude for the NHS Doctors

Lucy Mecklenburgh has revealed her baby daughter Lilah was hospitalised with Bronchiolitis.

Taking to Instagram on Thursday, the former TOWIE star, 30, shared an image of her daughter in her hospital bed as well as one of her feeding the tot as she marked World Breastfeeding Awareness Month.

And in her caption Lucy, who shares Lilah with fiance Ryan Thomas, thanked NHS doctors and Nurses for helping her little girl, whom she reveals was given oxygen. 

Poorly: Lucy Mecklenburgh has revealed her baby daughter Lilah was hospitalised with Bronchiolitis

Poorly: Lucy Mecklenburgh has revealed her baby daughter Lilah was hospitalised with Bronchiolitis

In a lengthy post, Lucy explained how her her daughter had to be fed via a tube and shared her joy at being able to breastfeed her again.

She wrote ‘It’s #worldbreastfeedingawarenessweek and I wanted to share this monumental moment with you.

‘Since Sunday Lilah has been in hospital with bronchiolitis. She was being tube fed and on oxygen.

‘This moment is the special moment she had her first proper breast feed again and it felt amazing. There are times in my bf journeys with both my kids that I felt like I just wanted my body to myself for a day & sometimes felt overwhelmed with the sense of responsibility that they rely so heavily on me to be fed.’

Update: Taking to Instagram on Thursday, the former TOWIE star, 30, shared an image of her daughter in her hospital bed as well as one of her feeding the tot as she marked World Breastfeeding Awareness Month

Update: Taking to Instagram on Thursday, the former TOWIE star, 30, shared an image of her daughter in her hospital bed as well as one of her feeding the tot as she marked World Breastfeeding Awareness Month

She went on: ‘This week I’ve felt lost not being able to feed my 2 month old baby girl, or cuddle her and play with her. Even though I rarely left her side I missed her so much.

There’s been lots of worry, lots of pumping and a hell of a lot of gratitude for the nhs Doctors & nurses for getting my baby girl well again.

‘World breast feeding week is about educating, sharing & supporting so I wanted to share our week of feeding and some useful resources that have helped me that are linked in my stories. X.’

Bronchiolitis is a common lower respiratory tract infection that affects babies and children under two. 

The lung infection that causes inflammation and mucus to build in the airways, making breathing difficult. 

WHAT IS BRONCHIOLITIS? AND WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?

Bronchiolitis is a common lower respiratory tract infection that affects babies and children under two.

Most cases clear up within two-to-three weeks without treatment.

However, some infants suffer severe symptoms that require treating in hospital.

Early symptoms are similar to a cold, such as a runny nose or cough. Over the next few days, these may develop into:

  • Fever
  • Dry, persistent cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Wheezing

Parents should contact their GP or NHS 111 if their child has eaten less than usual over their past few feeds or has had a dry nappy for 12 hours.

A persistent temperature of 38°C or above and a child who seems tired or irritable may also be a cause for concern.

Parents should call 999 if their child has difficulty breathing, a blue tongue or lips, or if there are long pauses between breaths.

Bronchiolitis is caused by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which spreads via tiny droplets from the sneezes or coughs of an infected person.

This causes the small airways in the lungs to become inflamed, which reduces the amount of air that can enter them.

Around one in three children become infected in the first year of their life. By age two, almost all children will have been infected, of which around half of go on to develop bronchiolitis.

There is no medication that kills RSV but treatment is not usually required.

Only between two and three per cent of babies need taking to hospital due to bronchiolitis.

If a child become infected, parents should ensure they stay hydrated and give them painkillers if necessary.

Bronchiolitis is hard to prevent but the following may help:

  • Wash your hands and your child’s frequently
  • Wash or wipe toys and surfaces regularly
  • Keep newborns away from people with colds or flu
  • Keep infected children at home until their symptoms clear up 
  • Do not expose your child to smoke

Source: NHS Choices 

Advertisement

Source

Related posts