Man, 34, dies after being shoved onto tracks at Upper West Side subway stop

First subway shoving death of 2023: Man, 34, dies after being shoved onto tracks and cracking his head at Upper West Side subway stop by man with history of mental health calls

  • A man has died after being shoved on the subway tracks during a dispute in the early hours of Friday morning 
  • The man, who is still unidentified, was quickly rushed to hospital, where he died
  • Police arrested a 28 year old suspect at the scene, who reportedly has a history of mental illness calls to the NYPD 

A 34 year-old man has died after being pushed onto subway tracks at the 96th street station in the Upper West Side – the first fatal shove of 2023. 

The man, who has not yet been identified, cracked his head open after being thrust onto the tracks during an argument just before 2am on Friday morning. 

EMS rushed the man to St. Luke’s Hospital, where he later died of his injuries.  

Andre Boyce, 28, who has a history of mental health calls with the NYPD, was taken into custody by cops at the scene. Charges against him were pending as of Friday afternoon. 

The fatal shoving is the first deadly subway incident of the new year – with 2022 seeing more people pushed onto tracks by October than in the entire year of 2021. 

The man, who has not yet been identified, cracked his head open after being thrust onto the tracks during an argument just before 2am on Friday morning

The man, who has not yet been identified, cracked his head open after being thrust onto the tracks during an argument just before 2am on Friday morning

According to figures obtained by Dailymail.com from the New York City Police Department, there were 22 recorded subway shovings by October 16, 2022. By October 26, another 3 had been pushed to the tracks – one fatally.

More recent numbers from the NYPD continue to paint a bleak picture of the city’s efforts to fight crime rates that rocketed during the pandemic. 

Data shows rapes, robberies, and assaults are all up from last year, since hitting highs not seen in decades in both 2020 and 2021.

Rape – which rose in 2020 when streets were empty and unemployment rife due to unrest caused by the coronavirus – climbed by 7 percent, with more than 120 occurring this year than last.

Pictured, 96th Street subway train station in New York, NY

Pictured, 96th Street subway train station in New York, NY

The statistics paint a bleak picture of the city's efforts to address crime that's rocketed since the pandemic - a campaign that has been touted as successful several times over the past year by Mayor Eric Adams

The statistics paint a bleak picture of the city’s efforts to address crime that’s rocketed since the pandemic – a campaign that has been touted as successful several times over the past year by Mayor Eric Adams

Robberies, meanwhile, rose a shocking 20 percent, despite recent measures taken by Adams, 62, to increase police presence throughout the city.

Assaults and theft throughout the city, meanwhile, show a similarly pronounced rise, with felony assaults up 12 percent – 26,039 incidents this year compared to 22,835 seen last year – and burglaries up an alarming 25 percent.

All other crime categories – including grand larceny and motor vehicle theft – showed similar rises except for murders, despite the outset of the pandemic coming now nearly three years ago.

The statistics directly contradict repeated statements from Adams that New York – which saw incidents of violence and shootings swell to historic highs in 2020 when its streets were hollowed out by lockdowns – was well on the path to recovery, the most recent of which came just last month.

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