Mild January freezing end forecasters winter storm stretching from Texas to Maine 48 INCHES snow

Unseasonably mild January is set to come to freezing end, as forecasters say huge winter storm stretching from Texas to Maine will bring up to 48 INCHES of snow

  • A mild January has left many parts of the country with far less snow than usual
  • But now there’s the potential for a major storm system to spread snow from Texas through Maine, together with heavy rain
  • By Wednesday and Thursday, the heart of the storm system is expected to be over the Northeast, where inland regions may see several inches of snow 

Winter is to finally make an appearance in parts of the country that have yet to experience their usual seasonal snowfall.

Forecasters say a significant system is expected to bring snow in a storm stretching almost two thousand miles from Texas to Maine, with heavy rain and strong winds also likely.

Until now, January has been relatively mild compared to normal in many of those areas but things are about to change. 

According to forecast models, moisture will begin to accumulate over the Rockies and southern Plains on Monday, with the most significant impacts being felt in Texas and Oklahoma on Tuesday.

Winter is to finally make an appearance in parts of the country that have yet to experience their usual seasonal snowfall

Winter is to finally make an appearance in parts of the country that have yet to experience their usual seasonal snowfall

Depending on where the line of wintry weather forms, some regions could see heavy snowfall if temperatures are cold enough.

Depending on where the line of wintry weather forms, some regions could see heavy snowfall if temperatures are cold enough.

Forecasters say a significant system is expected to bring snow in a storm stretching almost two thousand miles from Texas to Maine, with heavy rain and strong winds also likely

Forecasters say a significant system is expected to bring snow in a storm stretching almost two thousand miles from Texas to Maine, with heavy rain and strong winds also likely

A significant dip in the jet stream will allow cold Canadian air to push into areas of New Mexico and Texas, resulting in widespread snowfall. 

Depending on where the line of wintry weather forms, some regions could see heavy snowfall if temperatures are cold enough. 

Amarillo, Texas and Oklahoma City are just two cities that are expected to see some snowfall. 

As the storm system moves northeastwards, snow will fall over parts of the middle Mississippi Valley and upper Ohio Valley by Wednesday. 

T¿he system is currently moving into the Midwest with snow and a wide expanse of rain and a few thunderstorms across the Southeast

T​he system is currently moving into the Midwest with snow and a wide expanse of rain and a few thunderstorms across the Southeast

Depending on where the line of wintry weather forms, some regions could see heavy snowfall if temperatures are cold enough.

Depending on where the line of wintry weather forms, some regions could see heavy snowfall if temperatures are cold enough.

The system is currently moving into the Midwest with snow and a wide expanse of rain and a few thunderstorms across the Southeast

The system is currently moving into the Midwest with snow and a wide expanse of rain and a few thunderstorms across the Southeast

While most accumulations are expected to be light, but swathe of the country from Missouri through Illinois and into Indiana and Michigan could see more substantial snowfall leading to potential travel disruptions.

At the southern end of the storm system, large parts of the Southeast, Tennessee Valley, and I-95 corridor are expected to remain snow-free but will receive plenty of rain. 

Later in the week by Wednesday or Thursday, the heart of the system is expected to be over the Northeast, where inland regions may see several inches of snow.

Major cities will mostly see rain with temperatures remaining too warm for snow  to accumulate. 

Higher elevations including the Catskills in New York and White Mountains in New England could easily see heavy snow measured in feet. 

New York has been unusually dry this winter, compared to other years where it typically sees up to nine inches of snow - pictured January 5

New York has been unusually dry this winter, compared to other years where it typically sees up to nine inches of snow – pictured January 5

The last time the city saw snow was March 9, 2022 - meaning the city has been without snow for 313 days

The last time the city saw snow was March 9, 2022 – meaning the city has been without snow for 313 days

As for New York City, a wintry mix is likely to hit the Big Apple which is experiencing a ‘snow drought’ which has been without measurable snowfall – which is categorized as 0.1 inches or more – for 318 days as of this week

The longest period without snow in the city’s history lasted 332 days, ending on December 15, 2020.

Meanwhile the second-longest snowless streak was 322 days ending in 1973 and the third was 319, ending in 2002.

This year is on track to become the second latest-recorded snowfall in a New York winter, overtaking a record in 1871 when the white stuff did not arrive until January 21. 

Downtown Buffalo, as seen on December 23, 2022

Downtown Buffalo, as seen on December 23, 2022

The storm began in Buffalo as a record-breaking nearly two inches of rain drenched the area

The storm began in Buffalo as a record-breaking nearly two inches of rain drenched the area

But it is likely to fall just shy of beating the absolute record which was in 1973 when no measurable snow occurred until January 29 that year.

Last month, a massive storm battered the city of Buffalo in Western New York.

The bomb cyclone brought blizzards, freezing temperatures and flooding. 

The National Guard was deployed to help with rescue efforts after emergency services were overwhelmed and police vehicles and ambulances were left unable to travel in the Arctic conditions. 

The storm impacted 200 million people claimed the lives of at least 23 people, three of whom were  in Erie County. 

The storm is impacted 200 million people nationwide while leaving millions without electricity on Christmas Day. 

Cars were buried under several feet of snow with people stranded on highways, unable to get help

Cars were buried under several feet of snow with people stranded on highways, unable to get help

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