Mobile point-to-point safety cameras rolled out in Western Australia

‘Swiss Army Knife’ of cameras are rolled out to catch drivers doing anything remotely wrong

  • WA to trial new speed cameras that also pick up other bad behaviours of drivers  
  • Point-to-point cameras snap drivers not wearing seat belts or using mobiles
  • Mobile cameras being trialled in and around Perth to assess risky driving
  • Images can be passed to police but not used to press charges at this point 

The next generation of speed cameras being rolled out in Western Australia don’t only catch lead foots but also snap drivers using mobile phones or not wearing seat belts.

In a $1.5million three-month trial, the first mobile point-to-point road safety cameras in Australia will be deployed in and around Perth.

Six cameras, which work in pairs, will measure the average speeds of drivers over a distance, which means those who only slow down when they spot a camera are more likely to be caught.

The lenses – dubbed the Swiss Army Knives of Camera’s – also have the ability to zoom inside a vehicle to detect if motorists are texting or not buckled up.

In a $1.5million three-month trial, the first mobile point-to-point road safety cameras (pictured) in Australia will be deployed across Perth.

In a $1.5million three-month trial, the first mobile point-to-point road safety cameras (pictured) in Australia will be deployed across Perth.

The next generation of speed cameras being rolled out in Western Australia don't only catch lead foots but also snap drivers using mobile phones or not wearing seat belts

The next generation of speed cameras being rolled out in Western Australia don’t only catch lead foots but also snap drivers using mobile phones or not wearing seat belts

However, during the pilot the cameras will not be directly used to issue infringements as laws would need to be passed to allow this.

For now they will be tested for their suitability but police can use the data to determine where certain offences are happening.

West Australia’s Road Safety Minister Paul Papalia said images showing particularly dangerous behaviour would be passed onto police to investigate. 

‘Speed, inattention and not wearing a seatbelt are all contributors to trauma on our roads, so I am pleased to trial Australian-first technology that can detect all three of these high-risk behaviours anywhere, anytime,’ Mr Papalia told The West Australian newspaper.

He described the new technology as the ‘Swiss Army Knife of road safety cameras which will act as a deterrent.

West Australia's Road Safety Minister Paul Papalia (centre) said the new cameras would save lives

West Australia’s Road Safety Minister Paul Papalia (centre) said the new cameras would save lives

‘While no infringements will be issued, I hope the trial prompts people to think twice before they take a risk that could cost them, or someone else their life, he said. 

The cameras, which were created by Australian company Acusensus, will be sent out to regions within 200km of Perth. 

‘With more than 70 per cent of the road fatalities this year occurring in regional areas, a key focus of the trial is testing the safety cameras on a range of regional roads, particularly those where people have sadly lost their lives,’ Mr Papalia said. 

Fixed point to point safety cameras are already in operation in New South Wales and Queensland.

‘We’ve seen new camera technology result in promising reductions in fatalities in other states and I am proud to build on this, and take the lead in safety camera technology with this trial,’ Mr Papalia said. 

The WA government is trialling Australia's first mobile point to point speed cameras

The WA government is trialling Australia’s first mobile point to point speed cameras

The hi-tech smart cameras use artificial intelligence to determine offences and can snap an unlimited amount of cars with a focus on every vehicle that goes past.  

WA government has promised that images not showing offending behaviour will be discarded. 

The number of people seriously injured in WA while not wearing a seatbelt increased nearly 25 per cent last year compared to the five-year average. 

The fine in WA for not wearing a seatbelt starts at $550, with higher penalties if children are unrestrained.

Using, which means even touching, a mobile phone while driving incurs a $500 penalty plus three demerit points.

Drivers using a mobile as streaming service while driving cop a $1000 fine and four demerit points.

Source

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