New footage shows NYC subway shooter NAPPING and peeing himself during FBI interview

Chilling new footage shows NYC subway shooter NAPPING and peeing himself during FBI interview after shooting 10, as another new clip shows panic inside blood-smeared train

  • Frank James naps and wets himself during two-hour interview with police 
  • New video released Wednesday shows the horror and blood-stained train 
  • He pleaded guilty on Tuesday to terrorism charges for the April 12 attack
  • James, 63, opened fire on the northbound N train that was traveling through Sunset Park, Brooklyn shooting 10 people and wounding another 23
  • He admitted 11 charges in court Tuesday, and faces life in prison  

New footage shows the NYC subway shooter napping and wetting himself during an FBI interview – with newly-released clips also showing the chaos in the aftermath of his bloodbath.

Footage obtained by NBC New York in the wake of Frank James’ guilty plea Tuesday shows his nonchalant attitude following his arrest in April, two days after the attack that injured 10 subway passengers on a Brooklyn N train.

He denies all knowledge of what cops quiz him about during an interview. At one point in the clip, James, 63, can be seen cocking his head back to sleep. 

He also peed himself during the interview, and was seen being helped away by two cops, before later telling them he spends his day drinking and making YouTube clips, adding: ‘That’s all I do.’ 

The 63-year-old shooter opened fire on the northbound N train that was traveling through Sunset Park, Brooklyn. Miraculously, no-one was  injured in the attack, with never before-seen footage showing the blood-smeared chaos and panic inside the subway car moments after James unloaded his gun. 

Frank James is seen napping in the chair with his head cocked back while alone in the interview room during the two-hour long police interview on Wednesday

Frank James is seen napping in the chair with his head cocked back while alone in the interview room during the two-hour long police interview on Wednesday 

James is seen holding himself as he appears to have wet his pants as investigators assist him

James is seen holding himself as he appears to have wet his pants as investigators assist him 

He was captured nearly 30 hours later after a grueling manhunt, after James called police and turned himself in, saying ‘I get my phone and open YouTube and there is just video after video of me plastered of the face of suspect,’ NBC New York reported. 

James now faces a potential life sentence. 

FBI agents and investigators are seen in the video that was released on Wednesday asking James if he has any plans to hurt anyone else. 

James responded, ‘I don’t know what you are talking about.’ During the two- hour interview with authorities, James is seen sitting in a chair facing two investigators.

The second harrowing video shared by investigators shows passengers injured and bleeding scattered across the floor of the moving train as stream of gunshots are heard. 

Panicked passengers asking, ‘Were those gunshots? Oh, my god!’ as others cried for help. ‘Please someone help  me get off.’ While another moaned, ‘My leg hurts a lot…the right one.’ 

During the terror, kind-hearted New Yorkers are seen jumping to assist and comforting the wounded. ‘I’ll help you. I’ll help you.’ ‘Don’t let anyone bump into you,’ one person said. ‘You are okay.’  

Shaken passengers gave an account of the horror they just witnessed. ‘It was an explosive bomb…black smoke …popping sounds came from the end of the train next to a construction worker with orange clothes on,’ a female rider said.

As the train approaches the 36th Street station an MTA worker arrives and an army of first responders rush to the gory scene, but James is nowhere in sight. It was later revealed that he escaped hopping onto another train on the platform. 

Additional video footage shows James calmly walking in the street after the attack – dressed in his orange construction jacket and hat – hauling a black suitcase and carrying a black backpack bags.

The footage shows James telling investigators during the two-hour video that he had black bag of supplies on that train and admitted driving the van bringing the weapons from Philadelphia to New York. 

An unidentified man is seen down on the ground reeling in pain as pools of blood are beside him after the subway attack that saw 10 people shot and 23 people injured on April 12, 2022

An unidentified man is seen down on the ground reeling in pain as pools of blood are beside him after the subway attack that saw 10 people shot and 23 people injured on April 12, 2022

A blood-soaked towel near pools of blood line the floor of the subway car

Passengers personal belongings including a water bottle were scattered and a person's sneaker

Panicked passengers asking, ‘Were those gunshots? Oh, my god!’ as others cried for help. ‘Please someone help me get off.’ While another moaned, ‘My leg hurts a lot…the right one’

Images of terrified passengers running to safety. Some kind-hearted New Yorkers were see rushing to help the wounded after the unprovoked attack

Images of terrified passengers running to safety. Some kind-hearted New Yorkers were see rushing to help the wounded after the unprovoked attack 

Prosecutors have asked federal Judge William Kuntz II to sentence James to more than 40 years in prison for the attack.

They wrote in a letter last week that he should be imprisoned beyond the roughly 32-year to 29-year sentence that federal guidelines recommend, arguing that James planned the attack for years and endangered the lives of dozens of people, FOX 5 reports. 

Assistant U.S. Attorney Sara Winik said when James first appeared in court that he ‘terrifyingly opened fire on passengers on a crowded subway train, interrupting their morning commute in a way this City hasn’t seen in more than 20 years,’

James was arrested following a 24-hour manhunt across the city

James was arrested following a 24-hour manhunt across the city

‘The defendant’s attack was premeditated, it was carefully planned, and it caused terror among the victims and our entire city.’

In court documents, prosecutors also suggested that James had the means to carry out more attacks. 

He was previously charged with a single terrorism offense to which he pleaded not guilty, but the charges against him were later upgraded.

Ten of the charges he pleaded guilty to on Tuesday — one for each victim — accuse him of committing a terrorist attack on a mass transportation system.

The 11th charge accuses James of discharging a firearm in a violent crime.

James was set to face trial in February on these charges, but his attorneys wrote in court documents on December 21 that he will plead guilty.

Kuntz had since issued an order instructing the US Marshals Service to use ‘all necessary force’ to ensure James to show up for the plea proceeding on Tuesday, noting that he failed to show up for previous hearings.

In October, for example, the gunman balked at being brought to the Brooklyn federal court,  but appeared later in the day after Kuntz issued a similar order.

At the time of the attack James, dressed in a construction worker’s vest and helmet, donned a gas mask and rolled smoke grenades into the train car before opening fire.

Videos from the scene showed hundreds of commuters frantically running for the exits as shots were fired, while others were left bleeding in the station.

The Bronx-born, Milwaukee-based suspect was ultimately arrested while strolling down the street on April 13. 

In court documents, prosecutors detailed how more ammunition had been found in James’ rented Philadelphia apartment, including an extended round magazine that was fit for a semi-automatic rifle. 

Frank James, 63, is seen walking with police and FBI after he turned himself after seeing YouTube videos of himself on his phone after the April 12, 2022 subway attack where he opened fire shooting 10 and injuring 23 passengers. James was charged with a federal terrorism offense and faces a potential life sentence 

James is seen smirking as he is being placed into a police vehicle after the nearly 30 hour manhunt. James eventually turned himself into the authorities after the brutal April 12 attack

James is seen smirking as he is being placed into a police vehicle after the nearly 30 hour manhunt. James eventually turned himself into the authorities after the brutal April 12 attack 

James is seen hauling a suitcase and black knapsack dressed in construction gear and hat after opening fire on a Brooklyn subway train

James is seen hauling a suitcase and black knapsack dressed in construction gear and hat after opening fire on a Brooklyn subway train 

An artist rendered sketch of James sitting in the courtroom. He has been accused of carrying out the worst attack on a New York subway system in years, pleaded guilty to terrorism charges on Tuesday

An artist rendered sketch of James sitting in the courtroom. He has been accused of carrying out the worst attack on a New York subway system in years, pleaded guilty to terrorism charges on Tuesday

His 9mm handgun was later found at the 36th Street subway station after the attack, along with spent shell casings, fireworks, and a key to his U-Haul. 

Police also searched a storage unit in Philadelphia, where he was keeping more ammunition, a torch and a gun silencer. 

There was also a propane gas tank in the U-Haul when police swooped in on it hours after the attack. 

James allegedly dumped the truck five miles from the 36th Street subway and was filmed walking away. His motive remains unknown.

James has a criminal history which extends back to 1992, when he pleaded guilty to attempted petit larceny.

He was known to the FBI’s Guardian Program, which tracks terror threats and suspects, over an incident in New Mexico in 2019. 

At the time, he was cleared of all wrongdoing.  

But in a YouTube video posted just one day before the attack, James said he wanted to harm people, calling himself the Prophet of Doom.

‘I can say I wanted to kill people. I wanted to watch people die,’ he said. 

Another video showed him pointing at passengers one by one in a packed New York City subway car. 

Other videos featured James ranting about discrimination and complaining about white people.

Mayor Eric Adams suggested that it was the responsibility of YouTube to monitor the videos and report them.

‘There’s a corporate responsibility hen we are watching hate brew online,’ Adams said at the time.

‘We can identify [hate] using artificial intelligence and other methods to identify those who are talking about violence.’

Critics accused Adams of passing the buck, noting that the surveillance cameras in the station were not working – allowing James to flee – and that NYPD failed to find him, despite his wandering around Manhattan for almost 24 hours after the attack and eventually calling the police himself.

A month after the attack in May, James’ lawyers accused FBI investigators of breaching his rights by swabbing his cheek for a DNA sample and making him sign papers without asking for permission from his legal team, or ensuring they were there in accordance with James’ legal rights.   

Further details of that interaction at Brooklyn’s Metropolitan Correctional Center have not been shared.

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