New Greens MP Max Chandler-Mather is blasted for not wearing a tie in Parliament

Astonishing moment new Greens MP is told his Question Time outfit is completely inappropriate: ‘This is not a BARBEQUE!’

  • Max Chandler-Mather, 30, spoke in Question Time without wearing a tie 
  • The move offended Nationals MP Pat Conaghan who raised a point of order
  • Mr Conaghan complained about the ‘state of undress’ of the Greens member
  • But the Speaker dismissed his concerns. There is no set dress code in Parliament 

A new Greens MP has sparked outrage for failing to wearing a tie while asking a question in Parliament.

Max Chandler-Mather – the 30-year-old MP for Griffith in Brisbane – only spoke for three seconds at Wednesday’s Question Time before he was interrupted by an angry Nationals MP.

Pat Conaghan, MP for Cowper in regional NSW, raised a point of order, saying: ‘Mr Speaker, I draw your attention to the state of undress of the member.’

Speaker Milton Dick dismissed Mr Conaghan’s interjection and allowed Mr Chandler-Mather to continue with his question on public housing, saying: ‘That is not a point of order. Resume your seat.’

There is no set dress code for Parliament, with the rule book saying ‘ultimate discretion rests with the Speaker’. 

After the incident, Mr Conaghan released a statement blasting Mr Chandler-Mather’s attire. 

‘This is not a barbecue. This is Question Time in the Australian Parliament. What next, board shorts and thongs? Maybe a onesie in winter,’ he said.

‘Some may say that it’s a minor matter to not comply with the dress standard but what it says to many, including me, is that there is little respect for the tradition and history of our parliament.’

Pat Conaghan (pictured), MP for Cowper in regional NSW, raised a point of order, saying: 'Mr Speaker, I draw your attention to the state of undress of the member'

Pat Conaghan (pictured), MP for Cowper in regional NSW, raised a point of order, saying: ‘Mr Speaker, I draw your attention to the state of undress of the member’

Mr Chandler-Mather defended his decision, telling The Sydney Morning Herald: ‘It’s completely bizarre that I need to dress up like a businessman when this place is supposed to represent all Australians. 

‘I stood up to talk about the housing crisis and the Libs wanted to talk about my tie.’

Earlier on Wednesday Greens leader Adam Bandt revealed his party will support Labor’s climate change bill, meaning it will almost certainly pass parliament.

The government’s bill enshrines an emissions reduction target of 43 per cent by 2030 and net zero by 2050, and will require the minister of the day to report annually to parliament on the nation’s progress.

Negotiations between Mr Bandt and Mr Bowen had been ongoing after the Greens voiced concerns about the bill.

The Greens wanted faster action on climate change, calling for a 2030 emissions reduction target of 75 per cent during the election campaign. 

Greens leader Adam Bandt is seen leaving Kensington Primary school with his partner after voting on Federal Election day

Greens leader Adam Bandt is seen leaving Kensington Primary school with his partner after voting on Federal Election day

Labor needs the support of all 12 Greens senators plus one crossbencher in order for the bill to pass the upper house.

Independent David Pocock, former Wallabies captain, has indicated he will support the bill, meaning it will now almost certainly pass the senate. 

Mr Albanese said he was ‘very confident’ the bill would pass, and urged the Coalition to also back it.

‘This is an opportunity for the whole of the parliament to be on the right side of history,’ he said.

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