New report reveals popular grocery items affected by ‘shrinklation’ in latest cost-of-living issue


REVEALED: All the supermarket items affected by ‘shrinkflation’ – as expert warns cost of living pressures won’t ease anytime soon

  • Shrinklation latest cost-of-living issue for Aussie households feeling the pinch
  • Popular grocery items are shrinking in size while prices are remaining the same
  • Size of Mars chocolate bars have been reduced to 47g from 50g and still cost $2
  • Supermarket chains have introduced ways households can save on weekly shop 

A new report has revealed popular grocery items like chips, chocolate bars and peanut butter have been reduced in size but still cost the same. 

Money-saving app Frugl released a list of products affected by ‘shrinklation’ which has seen popular items shrink while prices stay the same or increase.

The report found that unbeknownst to Aussie shoppers some products had decreased in size by up to 20 per cent, without a change in price. 

A new report has revealed popular grocery items like chips, chocolate bars and peanut butter have been reduced in size but still cost the same (pictured, a Woolworths in Melbourne)

A new report has revealed popular grocery items like chips, chocolate bars and peanut butter have been reduced in size but still cost the same (pictured, a Woolworths in Melbourne)

A tub of Bega Peanut Butter (pictured) has decreased from 500g to 470g and in June, 2020 raised its price by 20 cents from $5.70 to $5.90

A tub of Bega Peanut Butter (pictured) has decreased from 500g to 470g and in June, 2020 raised its price by 20 cents from $5.70 to $5.90

Mars chocolate bars have decreased from 53g to 47g and still cost customers $2, while Arnotts Tina Wafers decreased from 250g to 200g and still cost $3.05. 

Burger Rings and Twisties have both reduced their serving size from 100g to 90g and still cost shoppers $2.20 instead of $2. 

The report revealed other grocery items had been reduced in size by 17 per cent while prices were actually on the rise. 

A tub of Bega Peanut Butter has decreased from 500g to 470g and in June, 2020 raised its price by 20 cents from $5.70 to $5.90. 

Frugl CEO Sean Smith told the Courier Mail it was unlikely the products would ever return to their original size. 

The chief executive said it was more likely that prices would come down but said this wasn’t coming ‘anytime soon’. 

POPULAR GROCERY ITEMS AFFECTED BY ‘SHRINKFLATION’

 Mars chocolate bar

Arnotts tina wafers 

Oreo cookies original

Doritos cheese dip 

Bega peanut butter 

Cheetos cheese balls

Jumpys chicken chips 

Twisties chicken

Burger rings

 53g to 47g

250g to 200g

137g to 133g

 300g to 280g

500g to 470g 

100g to 90g 

6 pack to 5 pack 

100g to 90g 

100g to 90g 

 Cost: $2

Cost: $3.05 

Cost: $2

Cost: $2.50 

Cost: $5.70 to $5.90

Cost: $2 to $2.20 

Cost: $3.20 to $3.50 

Cost: $2 to $2.20 

Cost: $2 to $2.20 

Advertisement
Oreo cookies (pictured) have deceased in size from 137g to 133g and still cost shoppers $2

Oreo cookies (pictured) have deceased in size from 137g to 133g and still cost shoppers $2

Burger Rings (left) and Twisties (right) have both reduced their serving size from 100g to 90g and still cost shoppers $2.20 instead of $2

‘These pressures aren’t looking to ease anytime soon and if we look over the past 12 months, the bulk price increases have been in the last quarter,’ Mr Smith said. 

‘It’s been quite recent because of major events, particularly the war in Ukraine and its impacts on fuel costs.’

What’s going up?

Vegetables: up 6.6%

Fruit: up 4.9%

Soft drinks: Coke 2L – up 50%

Instant coffee: Moccona – up 50%

Cooking oil: Crisco’s sunflower oil up 30%.

Baked beans: up 30%

Spaghetti in tomato sauce: – up 30%

Bread: up 20%

Sausages: up 20%.

Advertisement

He said rising production costs had also factored in to surge in prices. 

Shrinklation is the latest cost-of-living issue for households already feeling the pinch as the cost of fuel, electricity and groceries skyrockets. 

The price inflation initially mostly affected meat and imported products, but almost every food product is costing families more. 

Vegetables have also become a scarcity, with some supermarkets charging up to $12 for a head of iceberg lettuce due to a shortage caused by floods.

Australians are already paying 50 per cent more since the start of the year for instant coffee and a 2-litre bottle of Coca Cola, while fresh fruit and veg like tomatoes, carrots and apples up 40 per cent.

Bread, some cooking oils, sausages and baked beans have jumped 20-30 per cent.

The cost of living crisis is being triggered by a ‘perfect storm’ of factors in the aftermath of the Covid pandemic and Russia’s bloody invasion of Ukraine.

Power prices had exploded by a massive 141 per cent in the year to March before a bitter cold snap on the east coast caused prices to surge over the last two weeks.  

The average Australian family spends more than $200 on groceries and essentials every week, a significant portion of the weekly budget. 

Shrinklation is the latest cost-of-living issue for households already feeling the pinch as the cost of fuel, electricity and groceries skyrockets (pictured, a shopper in Perth)

Shrinklation is the latest cost-of-living issue for households already feeling the pinch as the cost of fuel, electricity and groceries skyrockets (pictured, a shopper in Perth)

The average Australian family spends more than $200 on groceries and essentials every week, a significant portion of the weekly budget (pictured, a Woolworths in Sydney)

The average Australian family spends more than $200 on groceries and essentials every week, a significant portion of the weekly budget (pictured, a Woolworths in Sydney)

It comes as supermarket chains Woolworths and Coles announced new measures to help tackle the cost-of-living crisis, with hundreds of dollars to be saved. 

Woolworths has pledged to freeze the prices of essential homebrand products such as flour, sugar, canned tomatoes, frozen peas, chicken tenders, laundry powder and dishwashing liquid. 

Coles is offering customers 10 per cent off the total transaction price for $100 and $250 gift cards, though there is an added purchase fee and a limit on how many cards you can buy. 

Coles customers will have to act quickly as the offer is temporary and finishes next Tuesday, but the Woolworths measure will last until the end of the year. 

Earlier this month, Coles said it would keep many essential items at or below $1, including pasta, soups and tinned tomatoes. 

Source

Related posts