New San Francisco DA Brooke Jenkins cracks down on drug dealers as she vows to revoke plea deals

New San Francisco DA Brooke Jenkins blasts recalled predecessor Chesa Boudin for failing to prosecute a SINGLE fentanyl seller – and promises to revoke plea deals he made for drug dealers

  • New DA Brooke Jenkins is reforming San Francisco’s drug dealing policies
  • She unveiled a new plan Wednesday aimed to combat violence and dealing
  • It prohibits certain dealers from being referred to drug treatment counseling
  • The plan adds extra penalties for drug dealing within 1,000 feet of a school
  • The DA’s office is also seeking pre-trial detention for repeat offenders 
  • Jenkins also slammed Chesa Boudin for not prosecuting a single fentanyl seller

San Francisco’s new district attorney blasted her woke predecessor for not prosecuting a single fentanyl dealer during his reign, despite the city’s drug crisis. 

Brooke Jenkins, the city’s interim DA, announced a new policy on Wednesday that intends to hold drug dealers accountable for their crimes.

She said the city’s dealers ‘abused’ former DA Chesa Boudin’s lenient policies and reaffirmed her commitment to changing the way the city is handling drug cases.

Jenkins, 40, assured the city she was ‘committed to ending open-air drug markets’ and making ‘changes now to save lives.’

Meanwhile, California Governor Gavin Newsom is set to decide on a new bill that would allow for more open-air drug sites across the state, despite the disastrous pilot attempt in San Francisco that Jenkins has vowed to shutdown.

San Francisco DA Brooke Jenkins, 40, on Wednesday (pictured) blasted her woke predecessor for not prosecuting a single fentanyl dealer during his reign, despite the city's drug crisis

San Francisco DA Brooke Jenkins, 40, on Wednesday (pictured) blasted her woke predecessor for not prosecuting a single fentanyl dealer during his reign, despite the city’s drug crisis

‘I promised the public immediately after my appointment that I was going to make a change with respect to the way we were handling drug dealing cases,’ Jenkins said during a press conference Wednesday. ‘That I was committed to ending open air drug markets and doing everything in my power to do so.

‘For the past year or more, the previous administration did not obtain a single fentanyl sales conviction, despite what was happening on our streets. 

‘I repeat not one single conviction for the sale of fentanyl despite, as I said, 1,500 overdoses deaths since 2020.’

Jenkins demanded city leaders no longer ‘standby while people continue to die on our streets’ and unveiled a new plan that she claims will make a ‘difference out on the street that we can all see and feel.’

Her plan, which was unveiled Wednesday, had three major components. 

It prohibits drug dealers arrested with more than five grams of fentanyl or other controlled substances from being referred to the Community Justice Court – which she claims was ‘abused’ under Boudin.

The plan has resumed charge enhancements – or extra penalties – for selling drugs within 1,000 feet of a school. 

And the district attorney’s office will now potentially seek pre-trial detention – being held in jail while awaiting trial – for repeat offenders and in extreme cases of fentanyl dealing.

She said the city's dealers 'abused' former DA Chesa Boudin's (pictured June 7) lenient policies and reaffirmed her commitment to changing the way the city is handling drug cases

She said the city’s dealers ‘abused’ former DA Chesa Boudin’s (pictured June 7) lenient policies and reaffirmed her commitment to changing the way the city is handling drug cases

Jenkins on Wednesday also pulled back over 30 plea offers from the previous administration that she deemed were too lenient.

Most of the revoked offers involved dealers selling ‘egregious amounts’ of fentanyl and people who had numerous open cases for dealing the drug.

‘On my watch, the DA’s office is going to take these cases seriously,’ Jenkins said. ‘We are dealing with a public health crisis with regards to fentanyl, and no longer are we going to be giving a free pass to people who sell that drug in San Francisco.’ 

‘These changes are going to make a difference out on the street and one that we can all see and feel. We cannot stand by while these neighborhoods continue to suffer with violence and drug dealing happening openly on their streets.

‘We also cannot continue to standby while people continue to die on our streets. We have to make changes now to save lives.’

Jenkins assured the city she was 'committed to ending open-air drug markets' and making 'changes now to save lives.' A drug user is seen injecting at the Tenderloin Linkage Center in San Francisco on January 23, 2022

Jenkins assured the city she was ‘committed to ending open-air drug markets’ and making ‘changes now to save lives.’ A drug user is seen injecting at the Tenderloin Linkage Center in San Francisco on January 23, 2022

A dealer is picture in the Tenderloin community on Tuesday

Jenkins unveiled a new plan Wednesday that prohibits drug dealers arrested with more than five grams of fentanyl or other controlled substances from being referred to the Community Justice Court

Jenkins unveiled a new plan Wednesday that prohibits drug dealers arrested with more than five grams of fentanyl or other controlled substances from being referred to the Community Justice Court. A dealer is picture in the Tenderloin community on Tuesday

The plan has resumed charge enhancements for selling drugs within 1,000 feet of a school. And the district attorney's office will now potentially seek pre-trial detention for repeat offenders and in extreme cases of fentanyl dealing. A drug user is pictured on the streets surrounding the Tenderloin linkage center in January 2022

The plan has resumed charge enhancements for selling drugs within 1,000 feet of a school. And the district attorney’s office will now potentially seek pre-trial detention for repeat offenders and in extreme cases of fentanyl dealing. A drug user is pictured on the streets surrounding the Tenderloin linkage center in January 2022

Jenkins’ plan is starkly different from that of her predecessor. Under Boudin, not a single person was convicted for selling illegal fentanyl. 

The arrested dealers did not go to jail but were referred to Community Justice Court, a progressive alternative to traditional criminal justice. 

Offenders, who rarely use the substances they sell, were routinely sent to drug treatment counseling and back out on the street dealing again within hours of arrest.

‘This ends now,’ Jenkins said, adding how she is adamant about forcing real change in the beleaguered city.

‘It’s about ensuring we are not cycling some of the most dangerous offenders back out there onto the streets without disrupting their business practice of selling lethal drugs to one of the most vulnerable communities that we have here in San Francisco: those who are struggling with substance abuse,’ she said. 

‘We have to send a strong message that if people choose to sell this legal drug in our city that they will be held accountable.’

Jenkins was appointed to the post of DA last month by Mayor London Breed following the recall of Boudin.

The city’s resident voted Boudin out of office during a recall election held in June. 

The recall effort was successful largely due to the permissive policies he and his office had regarding crime, including drug dealing.

Under his reign, fatal overdoses in the city also soared. According to the coroner, 2,090 lost their lives to drug overdoses in San Francisco from 2019 to June 2022.

The majority of the drugs are sold in the Tenderloin District where business is booming.

Dealers, mostly Honduran nationals, line the streets night and day to satisfy the city’s estimated 25,000 addicts and users.

The city’s residents and legitimate business owners, though, are suffering. Many dealers block building entrances, causing citizens to take matters into their own hands, putting themselves in danger.

They must confront the dealers, who are often armed, to enter and exit their homes.

Jenkins was appointed to the post of DA last month by Mayor London Breed following the recall of Boudin. She is pictured during a press conference on July 12 addressing the open air drug dealing in the Tenderloin

Jenkins was appointed to the post of DA last month by Mayor London Breed following the recall of Boudin. She is pictured during a press conference on July 12 addressing the open air drug dealing in the Tenderloin

Gina McDonald, one of the cofounders of Mothers Against Drug Deaths (MADD), a group working to stop open air drug dealing and to promote addiction treatment says Jenkins’ common sense approach is necessary.

McDonald’s daughter, now in recovery, struggled with substance use, as the heroin she bought from the San Francisco dealers was spiked with fentanyl. 

Her daughter’s drug dealer was arrested three times when Boudin was in office but never spent time behind bars. Boudin’s office referred him to ten Narcotics Anonymous meetings, despite him not being a drug user.

‘Dealers aren’t stupid,’ says McDonald. ‘They know what to put in the drugs to make them more addictive. But they have no fear of getting in trouble. It’s a free-for-all. They have food catering services come to them!’

‘Where’s my justice; my daughter’s justice?,’ asks McDonald. ‘We at MADD have been standing in the middle of the drug scenes demanding the city close them. Why has it been left to a group of mothers? Now, with what Jenkins is doing, we feel heard.’

However, while Jenkins is trying to crackdown on dealing and put an end to open-air drug sites, Governor Newsom could authorize legislation that creates more sites.

Senate Bill 57 was passed Tuesday by the state senate and is now with Newsom’s office where, if signed, it will be passed into law.

The bill would allow addicts to go take their drugs with needles and other paraphernalia that is paid for by the taxpayer. 

It does not indicate how many sites are planned for each city, or how many people would be employed. 

But it stipulates they all would have to provide clean needles, be trained in CPR and have access to overdose-reversing drugs. 

They would also have to ‘make public a good neighbor policy that facilitates communication from and to local businesses and residences.’

The bill passed yesterday with 21 Democratic votes over 10 Republican rejections and eight no votes recorded. Newsom has not yet indicated which way he is leaning.

Drug addicts injecting at the Tenderloin Linkage Center in San Francisco, a city-run site that is due to close this year after failing to make a dent in the drugs epidemic in the city

Drug addicts injecting at the Tenderloin Linkage Center in San Francisco, a city-run site that is due to close this year after failing to make a dent in the drugs epidemic in the city 

The Tenderloin Linkage Center in San Francisco was billed as an avant-garde approach to tackling the city's drug epidemic but only one out of 1,000 addicts actually sought treatment there

The Tenderloin Linkage Center in San Francisco was billed as an avant-garde approach to tackling the city’s drug epidemic but only one out of 1,000 addicts actually sought treatment there

The bill would create state-funded and supervised drug taking sites in three major cities; L.A., Oakland and San Francisco, which all have severe drug problems

The bill would create state-funded and supervised drug taking sites in three major cities; L.A., Oakland and San Francisco, which all have severe drug problems

The California Senate Republican Caucus had pleaded with Newsom’s office to veto the legislation.

‘Allowing people to get higher than a kite on heroin and other dangerous drugs, then turning them loose afterwards onto the streets is just crazy,’ said Senate Republican Caucus Chair Brian Jones in a statement afterwards. 

 Fueling the drug epidemic with drug dens and needle supplies is like pouring gasoline on a forest fire. It merely worsens the problem
California Senate Republican Caucus  

Newsom’s office would not be drawn on whether or not he intends to side with his fellow Democrats. 

‘Legislation before the Governor will be evaluated on its merits,’ a spokesman told The San Francisco Chronicle. 

A similar effort in San Francisco was launched by city officials last year but has already been axed due to the disastrous result. 

The Tenderloin Linkage Center in San Francisco was billed as an avant-garde approach to tackling the city’s drug epidemic but only one out of 1,000 addicts actually sought treatment there. 

The center cost a whopping $19million in city taxpayers money.  

DailyMail.com observed lines of drug addicts outside the facility injecting into their legs in broad daylight. 

The city recently announced that it would not be renewing the $75,000-a-month lease for the site location. 

The bill was proposed by State Senator Scott Wiener, who says they are a 'proven' way to reduce overdose deaths

The bill was proposed by State Senator Scott Wiener, who says they are a 'proven' way to reduce overdose deaths

The bill was proposed by State Senator Scott Wiener, who says they are a ‘proven’ way to reduce overdose deaths.

In their letter to Newsom’s office, the California Senate Republican Caucus pleaded: ‘It is not humane, or compassionate, to allow individuals to live, shoot up, or die on the streets without providing them the assistance and help they need to recover and live fulfilling lives. 

‘Fueling the drug epidemic with drug dens and needle supplies is like pouring gasoline on a forest fire. It merely worsens the problem. For all these reasons, we respectfully request your veto.’ 

State Senator Scott Wilk said: ‘Instead of focusing on a strategy to help people get their lives back, get off drugs and into treatment, CA Dems focus on giving people free needles and a safe place to shoot up.’ 

The bill was proposed by State Senator Scott Wiener, who says they are a ‘proven’ way to reduce overdose deaths. 

But San Francisco’s site drew in only a tiny number of the thousands who need help. 

In 2018, Governor Jerry Brown vetoed a similar bill on the grounds that it not only fueled the crisis, but that it opened up workers at the centers to federal criminal charges, despite protecting them from state prosecution.

Source

Related posts