Nicotine vapes and e-cigarettes labelled the next ‘big health issue’ facing young Australians


REVEALED: The next big health problem facing Aussies – as chief medical officer Paul Kelly Issues stern warning to parents about the risks

  • Chief Medical Officer Paul Kelly said vaping is Australia next ‘big health issue’
  • Between 2020 and 2021 the number of e-cigarette emergency calls doubled
  • Last October, 2021, it became illegal to import nicotine e-cigarettes to Australia
  • Peter Dutton said on Thursday that he would be open to discussing another ban 

Vaping habits in young people has been named Australia’s next ‘big health issue’ after the Covid pandemic.

Chief Medical Officer Paul Kelly said he was ‘deeply concerned’ by the number of young people smoking e-cigarettes following the National Health and Medical Research Council latest report on Thursday. 

The report found e-cigarettes expose smokers to potentially dangerous chemicals and toxins.

Chief Medical Officer Paul Kelly (above) said vaping habits in young people is Australia's 'big health issues' following the National Health and Medical Research Council latest report

Chief Medical Officer Paul Kelly (above) said vaping habits in young people is Australia’s ‘big health issues’ following the National Health and Medical Research Council latest report

New data shows one in five Australians aged 18 to 24 have tried e-cigarettes, while five per cent use regularly

New data shows one in five Australians aged 18 to 24 have tried e-cigarettes, while five per cent use regularly

The chemicals found include those from cleaning products, nail polish remover, weed killer and bug spray. 

Between 2020 and 2021 the number of calls to the national poisons hotline regarding vapes doubled.

Medical experts are particularly concerned about the take up of vaping among teens with flavours such as bubblegum, fairy floss, fruit loops, gummy bears and apple pie, luring young people in and getting them addicted.

The report found one in five Australians aged 18 to 24 have tried e-cigarettes, while five per cent use regularly.

The National Health and Medical Research Council latest report found chemicals in vapes are also found in cleaning products, nail polish remover, weed killer and bug spray (pictured, the NSW government's new anti-vape campaign)

The National Health and Medical Research Council latest report found chemicals in vapes are also found in cleaning products, nail polish remover, weed killer and bug spray (pictured, the NSW government’s new anti-vape campaign)

Data also showed there was little evidence that e-cigarettes were an effective steppingstone for traditional cigarette smokers looking to quit. 

‘The only thing we should be breathing in is air,’ Professor Kelly said.

‘One of my colleagues said recently that e-cigarettes are the next big health issue after Covid and I think that’s a really important statement to take on board.

‘Please discuss this evidence with your children, your nieces and nephews, students, players in your football or netball team, your brothers and sisters. We need that conversation out there.’

Medical experts are particularly concerned about vape flavours such as bubblegum, fairy floss, fruit loops, gummy bears and apple pie, luring young people in and getting them addicted (pictured, a set of brightly coloured vapes)

Medical experts are particularly concerned about vape flavours such as bubblegum, fairy floss, fruit loops, gummy bears and apple pie, luring young people in and getting them addicted (pictured, a set of brightly coloured vapes)

Last October it became illegal to import nicotine vapes to Australia without a valid prescription from an Australian doctor.

At that time it was already illegal for Australian retailers to sell nicotine vapes.

However, nicotine vapes are still for sale behind the counter at several tobacconists and convenience stores.

The Australian Council on Smoking and Health urged the government to ban the sale and promotion of e-cigarettes to young people.

Last year Australian retailers were outlawed from selling nicotine vapes but several tobacconists and convenience stores have continued to sell them under the counter

Last year Australian retailers were outlawed from selling nicotine vapes but several tobacconists and convenience stores have continued to sell them under the counter

Peter Dutton said on Thursday that he would be open to discussing a ban.

‘It is not an illegal product. If it was banned you would have the problems that go with prohibition,’ he said.

‘I don’t want to see an increase of smoking rates and I don’t want to see an increase of people taking up cigarettes.

‘But the department and government will be informed on these matters and we will see what happens.’

Worry vaping facts 

  • Many vapes contain nicotine making them addictive
  • Vapes can contain the same harmful chemicals found in cleaning products, nail polish remover, weed killer and bug spray
  • Vapes can leave young people at increased risk of depression and anxiety
  • The nicotine in one vape can = 50 cigarettes. Depending on the size of the vape and nicotine strength, it can be much higher
  • Young people who vape are 3 times as likely to take up smoking cigarettes
  • Vape aerosol is not water vapour
  • Vaping has been linked to lung disease
  • Vapes can cause long-lasting damaging effects on the brain and physical development

Source: NSW Government

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