Note found at scene of 10-year-old boy’s death at school in Wollongong suggests he took his own life

Community in shock after a note found at the scene of a 10-year-old boy’s death at school suggests he took his own life

  • A 10-year-old boy at primary school south of Wollongong died on Wednesday   
  • A note discovered at the scene suggests the death is not suspicious 
  • Emergency service workers struggled to come to terms with what they’d seen 
  • For support, you can contact Lifeline 13 11 14 or Beyond Blue on 1300 224 636 

A community is in shock after a note was found at the scene of a 10-year-old schoolboy’s death which suggests he took his own life. 

Emergency services were called to the primary school south of Wollongong in the Illawarra region of NSW on Wednesday after the unconscious boy was located.

However, the 10-year-old who was in Year 5 was unable to be revived. 

The Illawarra community is in shock after a note was found at the scene of a 10-year-old boy's death at school south of Wollongong, which suggests he took his own life

The Illawarra community is in shock after a note was found at the scene of a 10-year-old boy’s death at school south of Wollongong, which suggests he took his own life

It’s understood emergency service workers struggled to come to terms with what they had seen, The Daily Telegraph reported.    

note was discovered at the scene and the incident is not being treated as suspicious.

Spokesman for the Catholic Education Diocese of Wollongong said: ‘Following the death, the school and the Catholic Education Office have been and will continue providing comprehensive support to the school community, including counselling for staff and students.’

‘It’s the extent to which these communities, the school community, surrounding communities pull together and don’t blame each other, that will help us get through it,’ Executive Director of the University of Sydney’s Brain and Mind Research Institute, Professor Ian Hickie said.

Emergency service workers struggled to come to terms with what they had seen at the school

Emergency service workers struggled to come to terms with what they had seen at the school 

Professor Hickie added: ‘Pre-Covid we were seeing increased rates of psychological distress and self-harming behaviour in younger people and younger ages of onset.

‘Then we had Covid come along and that’s been really tough for young people, particularly school age and early post-school years.’

‘The upside is the community is aware, parents are aware, schools are aware, our general awareness of the extent to which young people are struggling has gone up,’ he said. 

Professor Hickie said Australians need to find a way to connect relatives and friends with kids within the community.  

For help in a crisis, call 000. If you or anyone you know needs support, you can contact Lifeline 13 11 14 or Beyond Blue on 1300 224 636.

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