Ola Jordan reveals she would ‘love’ to have more kids and would undergo IVF again

Ola Jordan reveals she would ‘love’ to have more kids and would undergo IVF again as she discusses fertility issues when having daughter Ella

Ola Jordan has revealed that she would ‘love’ to have more children as she discussed conceiving her daughter Ella after one round of IVF treatment.

The former Strictly Come Dancing star, 39, welcomed her daughter Ella, two, with her husband James, 44, in 2020 after three years of trying for a baby.

Ella was conceived after one round of IVF, with Ola and James previously being incredibly open about their battle to have a child.

Family: Ola Jordan has revealed that she would 'love' to have more children as she discussed conceiving her daughter Ella after one round of IVF treatment

Family: Ola Jordan has revealed that she would ‘love’ to have more children as she discussed conceiving her daughter Ella after one round of IVF treatment

Now, Ola has shared her hopes of having more children and revealed that she would turn to IVF again if she struggled to have a child naturally.

Speaking on Thursday’s GB News, Ola said: ‘I would love to have more children if it happens naturally, if it doesn’t I will go for another IVF, yes.’

The dancer candidly spoke about feeling like she had left it too late to have a child because she was focusing on her career – which saw her star on Strictly from 2006 to 2015.

‘I have an amazing career travelling around the world, and then you sort of forget yourself sometimes and you go, ‘oh, actually, probably I’ve missed the boat here’,’ she admitted.

First child: The former Strictly Come Dancing star, 39, welcomed her daughter Ella, two, with her husband James, 44, in 2020 after three years of trying for a baby

First child: The former Strictly Come Dancing star, 39, welcomed her daughter Ella, two, with her husband James, 44, in 2020 after three years of trying for a baby

Speaking about deciding to undergo IVF after having fertility issues, Ola admitted she found it ‘very hard’ because she didn’t know who to turn to for support.

She said women still don’t want to talk about going through IVF and said she didn’t ‘understand’ why she wasn’t getting pregnant when a lot of her friends were having babies. 

She explained: ‘It’s really hard because you don’t know who to turn to. Most of my friends used to get pregnant so easily.

‘I didn’t understand why I wasn’t getting pregnant. I was healthy, fit, I was a professional dancer.

Candid: Ella was conceived after one round of IVF, with Ola and James previously being incredibly open about their battle to have a child

Candid: Ella was conceived after one round of IVF, with Ola and James previously being incredibly open about their battle to have a child

‘It’s very hard and it’s very hard to turn to someone because everyone was getting pregnant around me.

‘But then when I went through IVF and I announced that I was going through IVF suddenly I found all those women coming up to me and going ‘I did IVF’, so suddenly there were a lot of women that I could talk to.

‘It’s still a subject that people don’t want to talk about, unfortunately.’

But Ola admitted that she had a ‘very positive’ experience with IVF, which saw her conceive her daughter Ella after one round of treatment.

‘I needed help and I needed to go through IVF which was obviously great for me because it happened for the first time and it was a very positive experience,’ she said.

Fertility: Now, Ola (pictured with James and Ella) has shared her hopes of having more children and revealed that she would turn to IVF again if she struggled to have a child naturally

Fertility: Now, Ola (pictured with James and Ella) has shared her hopes of having more children and revealed that she would turn to IVF again if she struggled to have a child naturally

‘But at the same time, it’s something that you don’t really want to have to do. You want to conceive naturally.’

She also addressed women delaying having children due to the cost of living and the Covid-19 pandemic, but said she wouldn’t want other women to ‘leave it too late’ and ‘struggle’.

‘Things have changed massively, 49% of women are delaying having children because of different things like the cost of living, and Covid, and the war in Ukraine, which I understand,’ she said.

‘Ask yourself a question here. Do I want to bring a child into a world like this?

‘But it’s hard. It’s hard because we just need to remember about ourselves, you don’t want to leave it too late and then struggle with that yourself.’

Hard times: Speaking about deciding to undergo IVF, Ola (pictured with James) admitted she found it 'very hard' because she didn't know who to turn to for support

Hard times: Speaking about deciding to undergo IVF, Ola (pictured with James) admitted she found it ‘very hard’ because she didn’t know who to turn to for support

It is not the first time Ola has spoken about her fertility issues, previously saying she wishes she had tried for a baby earlier.

Last year, Ola said she would have prioritised starting a family earlier if she knew she would struggle to fall pregnant.

She told The Sun: ‘You don’t think you’re going to have to go through IVF until it doesn’t happen for a long time and you go “right there’s a problem, we need to look into it”.’

‘So I suppose I would try earlier. But then we had a career, we were doing things, we were busy.  I suppose you’re never ready but I definitely would (have tried earlier) if I knew I was going to struggle to get pregnant.’

Joy: But Ola admitted that she had a 'very positive' experience with IVF, which saw her conceive her daughter Ella after one round of treatment

Joy: But Ola admitted that she had a ‘very positive’ experience with IVF, which saw her conceive her daughter Ella after one round of treatment 

Kids: Last year, Ola (pictured pregnant with Ella) said she would have prioritised starting a family earlier if she knew she would struggle to fall pregnant

Kids: Last year, Ola (pictured pregnant with Ella) said she would have prioritised starting a family earlier if she knew she would struggle to fall pregnant

Ola said her and James, who wed in 2003, were focused on their careers, saying: ‘You have to pick between something like Strictly or having a family, unfortunately.’

The star said she would have been unable to do Strictly – which she starred on from 2006-2015- with a baby as the BBC show is a ‘six or seven month’ commitment and she did not have anyone to look after her child. 

Speaking to the Sun about her daughter and the IVF process, Ola said: ‘We are very lucky it happened for us on the first attempt, and we’re extremely blessed to have Ella, she’s such a little character.’ 

She added: ‘There are so many people who go through IVF and it doesn’t happen for them. And there are lots of people out there who want a baby and they can’t afford it.’

How does IVF work?

In-vitro fertilisation, known as IVF, is a medical procedure in which a woman has an already-fertilised egg inserted into her womb to become pregnant.

It is used when couples are unable to conceive naturally, and a sperm and egg are removed from their bodies and combined in a laboratory before the embryo is inserted into the woman.

Once the embryo is in the womb, the pregnancy should continue as normal.

The procedure can be done using eggs and sperm from a couple or those from donors.

Guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends that IVF should be offered on the NHS to women under 43 who have been trying to conceive through regular unprotected sex for two years.

People can also pay for IVF privately, which costs an average of £3,348 for a single cycle, according to figures published in January 2018, and there is no guarantee of success.

The NHS says success rates for women under 35 are about 29 per cent, with the chance of a successful cycle reducing as they age.

Around eight million babies are thought to have been born due to IVF since the first ever case, British woman Louise Brown, was born in 1978.

Chances of success

The success rate of IVF depends on the age of the woman undergoing treatment, as well as the cause of the infertility (if it’s known).

Younger women are more likely to have a successful pregnancy.

IVF isn’t usually recommended for women over the age of 42 because the chances of a successful pregnancy are thought to be too low.

Between 2014 and 2016 the percentage of IVF treatments that resulted in a live birth was:

29 per cent for women under 35

23 per cent for women aged 35 to 37

15 per cent for women aged 38 to 39

9 per cent for women aged 40 to 42

3 per cent for women aged 43 to 44

2 per cent for women aged over 44

 

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