OR mom fails to change new state law that will put period products in girls AND boys’ bathrooms

Oregon mom fails to change woke new state law that will put period products in girls AND boys’ school bathrooms for students as young as FIVE – an initiative that will cost the state half of its education budget per year

  • Cherylene ‘Chery’ Stritenberg, 49, of Medford, filed a petition in late June to be changed to limit the number of bathrooms period products are in 
  • She wanted to limit the bathrooms to ‘at least’ two instead of every bathroom 
  • As the law currently stands, it requires all K-12 and public colleges to provide free pads and tampons in both girls and boys’ restrooms 
  • Stritenberg wanted to limit the number in order to cut the cost and to reallocate those funds to things like supplies and textbooks  
  • The current program is estimated to cost the state $2.8million out of its $4.6million annual education budget 
  • The Oregon Board of Education denied her request, saying it would change the legislative intent

An Oregon woman’s petition to change a new law that puts period products in all girls and boys’ restrooms has been rejected. 

Cherylene ‘Chery’ Stritenberg, 49, of Medford, filed a petition in late June. requesting the Menstrual Dignity Act be changed to limit the number of bathrooms period products can be freely distributed from. 

As the law currently stands, all bathrooms – both girls and boys – are required to have a selection of tampons and maxi pads offered to students K-12, as well as at public colleges. The purpose of the law is to help students of all gender identities through their periods. 

Many schools have already begun implementing the law in schools, which requires educational institutions to have dispensers in every bathroom and clearly mark in two languages that the products are free.  

Stritenberg, who is also a school board member at Eagle Point, petitioned the number be limited to ‘at least’ two bathrooms, to cut down the massive cost from the state’s education budget. 

The current program is estimated to cost the state $2.8million out of its $4.6million annual education budget. 

Cherylene 'Chery' Stritenberg, 49, of Medford, filed a petition in late June to be changed to limit the number of bathrooms period products are in. She wanted to limit the bathrooms to 'at least' two instead of every bathroom

Cherylene ‘Chery’ Stritenberg, 49, of Medford, filed a petition in late June to be changed to limit the number of bathrooms period products are in. She wanted to limit the bathrooms to ‘at least’ two instead of every bathroom

As the law currently stands, it requires all K-12 and public colleges to provide free pads and tampons in both girls and boys' restrooms. The program is estimated to cost the state $2.8million out of its $4.6million annual education budget

 As the law currently stands, it requires all K-12 and public colleges to provide free pads and tampons in both girls and boys’ restrooms. The program is estimated to cost the state $2.8million out of its $4.6million annual education budget

After she filed the petition, it was open to public comment in July and drew around 250 responses, with the majority agreeing to limit the scope of the initiative, according to the Oregonian

‘My petition doesn’t prevent a district from putting as many tampons in as many bathrooms as they see fit for their district; it just wouldn’t require all districts to do so,’ Stritenberg told the Oregonian. 

The mother, who has previously petitioned the state to lift its COVID vaccine requirement for teachers and volunteers, though, says the law is creating an added expense in a state that struggles to graduate more than 80 percent of its high school students.

In fact, the Oregon Legislative Revenue Office estimated last year that the state would direct about $5.6million from the State School Fund in the first two years – which is enough to pay for about 30 teachers’ salaries each year.

‘Don’t get me wrong, I’m not opposed to making these products available, but requiring we divert funds from our State School Funds to ensure they are included specifically in boys’ bathrooms is a misuse of those funds,’ Stritenberg said earlier this year, suggesting the money be used instead for new textbooks and supplies.

‘My hope is that we can re-evaluate and come to a better solution that is financially responsible and beneficial to those who need it,’ she said earlier this year.

However, the Board of Education rejected her petition, stating that changing the law would go against legislative intent. 

Stritenberg told the outlet she’s not ‘done’ yet and does plan to push the Legislature to change the law. 

Stritenberg wanted to limit the number in order to cut the cost and to reallocate those funds to things like supplies and textbooks

Stritenberg wanted to limit the number in order to cut the cost and to reallocate those funds to things like supplies and textbooks

The Menstrual Dignity Act was introduced in the Oregon state legislature by Democratic Representative Ricki Ruiz (pictured)

The Menstrual Dignity Act was introduced in the Oregon state legislature by Democratic Representative Ricki Ruiz (pictured)

The 49-year-old also appeared on Dr. Phil last week to discuss gender inclusivity and whether or not parents should be included on the discussion when a student brings up the topic to teachers.  

The mom advocated for parents to be included into the discussions of student who believe they might be transgender. 

Stritenberg argued that ‘there’s a difference between feeling uncomfortable going to your parents versus being harmed going to your parents’ and argued there should be state restrictions on when children should be able to start puberty blockers. 

‘When parents aren’t involved and they have that other side, there can be so much that is missed,’ she said on the September 16 episode. 

‘But what about somebody who ends up making a change because it’s not what’s meant for them, and they’re just confused? Then, they go down a road in these states where you can get medical hormone therapy and puberty blockers at ages when you’re not an adult yet. There’s an age restrictions on voting, driving, buying alcohol, firearms. There’s an age restrictions on a lot of things. There should be age restrictions on this.’

Meanwhile, a transgender guest Jordan disagreed, saying schools should provide an ‘environment to experience this themselves first, before it’s taken to the parents.’

‘As a child that has been in that position at some point in my life, it is so difficult to take information like this to your parents. Your parents are the last people you want to take that information too, because you don’t want to disappoint them,’ Jordan said on the show. 

‘For me, I think whilst the parents do need to be involved to a degree, yes, I don’t think it needs to be from first contact, we need to relay this to the parents.’ 

The Menstrual Dignity Act was originally introduced in the Oregon state legislature by Democratic Representative Ricki Ruiz, and was widely supported in the Oregon House of Representatives – with all but one Republican voting in favor of it.

Advocates claimed that providing free universal access to period products will alleviate unnecessary shame and expense for students going through puberty, the Oregonian reported.

That is widely-supported – although advocates say supplying the products in boys’ bathroom is a sop to wokeness and an unnecessary waste of money.

The original version of the bill only required schools to provide products in gender-neutral and girls’ bathrooms, and as the program rolled out last year, districts had to provide free tampons and pads in ‘at least two bathrooms,’ but had the discretion to pick which ones.

The law was later expanded to include all bathrooms designated for boys, so that transgender and non-binary students may have access to these products.

‘As we know, there’s a lot of our youth who don’t identify as female or male, or are transitioning genders,’ Ruiz said. ‘We wanted to respect that and make sure we provide these resources in all restrooms for folks who may be struggling to transition to a different restroom.’

It is now the most expansive menstrual products bill on the West Coast, according to the Oregonian. 

In California, high costs forced lawmakers to scale back their 2021 law to include only school bathrooms in grades six through 12, including in at least one boys’ bathroom per school.

She also appeared on Dr. Phil last week (pictured) to discuss including parents in on the discussion with teachers when students express they may think they are transgender. She expressed concern about students making the wrong choice about their gender identity without the inclusion of parents

She also appeared on Dr. Phil last week (pictured) to discuss including parents in on the discussion with teachers when students express they may think they are transgender. She expressed concern about students making the wrong choice about their gender identity without the inclusion of parents 

Community colleges and state universities are also required to have at least one location on campus where students an access these products.

And in Washington state, public and private schools are required to provide menstrual products in all gender-neutral and female bathrooms for students in grades six through 12.

If a school does not have a gender-neutral bathroom, they are required to put menstrual hygiene products in at least one male bathroom.

The law also requires that students in grades three through five have access to these products in at least one location.

But Oregon’s law goes further and requires tampons and pads in boys’ bathrooms for children as young as kindergarten – which Stritenberg says is a waste of resources, and worries students will misuse the products and cause damage to the facilities.

Already, Oregon Live reports, the Beaverton School District, Portland Public Schools and David Douglas School District have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on the new dispensers for all bathrooms, though state officials are supposed to reimburse the school districts for the costs.

Portland spent about $200,000 on products and dispensers, including larger units for gender-neutral and girls bathrooms, and smaller units for boys’ bathrooms.

The Beaverton School District, meanwhile, has spent close to $300,000.

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