Heat wave exposes ancient structures across the UK

The current heat wave in the British Isles has revealed a host of long-hidden historical sites that have suddenly become visible through the parched earth. In Wales, for example, a number of archaeological sites have suddenly appeared in fields of ripening crops and rain-starved grassland. Viewed from the air, prehistoric enclosures, Roman buildings and ancient cemeteries have become visible across the country. “This is an exceptional drought, the like of which Wales hasn’t seen for 40 years,” Dr. Toby Driver, senior aerial investigator for the Royal Commission on the Ancient…

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Shark attack victim says he was bitten in 2 feet of water

Dustin Theobald was at a Fernandina beach in Florida with his son on Friday, sitting on a surfboard in just 2 feet of water when he felt something tug at his foot. When the 30-year-old dad looked down, he saw a large fish. After touching its rough skin, the Florida man knew he was in trouble. “It wasn’t like fish skin. You know shark skin has a rough edge,” Theobald told WJAX-TV. The man believes the 4-foot nurse shark bit him as he attempted to kick it out of the…

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People with certain blood types more likely to be bitten by ticks

People with Type A blood are more likely to be bitten by ticks, a study has found. Scientists in the Czech Republic have found that ticks may be influenced by the “physiological or biochemical profile of an individual, such as their blood group.” Lead researcher Alena Zakovska, from the University of Masaryk University, said that this means a “blood group of an individual can be one of the factors that increase the risk of tick bite and the transmission of dangerous diseases and must not be underestimated.” Ticks are small…

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Japan is running out of ninjas

Japan is having a ninja crisis. The small city of Iga, famed as the birthplace of the ninja, can’t find enough martial artists to perform for tourists during its annual festival, according to an episode of “Planet Money” on NPR. Professional ninjas in Iga can make up to $85,000 per year, the report said, but a high salary isn’t enough to combat the central Japan city’s depopulation problem. In order for ninja shows to thrive, Iga needs to attract more young people willing to go through the intensive training. With…

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This mysterious disease makes it impossible to lose weight

Do your legs often swell up from the hips down to the ankles? Do you bruise really easily? Do your legs have small varicose veins? Are your legs ever painful or sensitive to touch? Do you have “cankles”? Do you wear a size 8 top and a size 18 bottom? Does your shape stay the same no matter what diet or exercise you do? If yes, then you may suffer from lipoedema. How do I know? I myself was recently diagnosed with stage one lipoedema. And let me tell you,…

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Everything we know about human evolution may be wrong

The idea goes that modern Homo sapiens — that’s us — evolved as an isolated community in Africa some 500,000 years ago. We then upped tools and trekked across the world, pushing Neanderthals aside as we went. Turns out, that may not be quite right. No, we’ve not found the imposing black monolith from the famous “2001: A Space Odyssey.” But some recent finds are no less significant. “A few years ago, it seemed all too easy,” writes University of New South Wales Dr. Darren Curnoe. “The matter was settled.…

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All of the Queen’s swans are being counted

CHERTSEY, England – An 800-year-old tradition of counting the swans owned by Britain’s Queen Elizabeth started on Monday, an annual ceremony of “swan upping” that in modern times has become a means of wildlife conservation. The upping sees three teams — one representing the queen and the others the old trade associations of the Vintners and Dyers — patrol the River Thames in south England over five days to capture, tag and release any families of swans with young. The upping dates back to the 12th century when the English…

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Church still investigating ‘weeping’ Virgin Mary statue

LAS CRUCES, NM — The Catholic Diocese of Las Cruces continues to investigate a Virgin Mary sculpture in a Hobbs church that appears to be weeping. The sculpture, which stands in the Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church, has been attracting attention worldwide since visitors first reported the fluid in May. Bishop Oscar Cantu of the diocese said Friday a sample of the fluid collected from the sculpture was sent for chemical analysis and it was determined that it was olive oil, the Las Cruces Sun-News reported. “Some of the…

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Town hires angler to deal with monster, duck-eating catfish

BERLIN — A German city is looking for a way to get rid of a giant catfish that is believed to have developed a taste for ducklings after eating all of its fellow fish in the municipal pond. The roughly 4.9-foot fish has been making waves in Offenbach, near Frankfurt. News agency dpa reported that the city government said Monday that it has found a professional angler to catch the fish, first seen about a year ago, but a formal contract has yet to be signed. The city plans to…

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College student discovers injury is actually rare cancer

A Michigan college student who thought the pain in his pelvis area was a sports-related injury was gutted to learn that it was actually a symptom of a rare cancer. Noah Holloway, 18, had just wrapped his first year at Central Michigan University when he was diagnosed with Ewing sarcoma, Fox 2 Detroit reported. “You just hear the ‘C word’ and it hits you like a truck,” Holloway said. “Up to that point, everyone was going ‘There’s a very slight chance of cancer. There’s almost no chance; I doubt it’s…

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