‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado’ Earns $19 Million, Beating Expectations

The Summer of Josh Brolin swelters on. “Sicario: Day of the Soldado,” in which he stars alongside Benicio Del Toro, opened to a better-than-expected $19 million in domestic ticket sales over the weekend. The film cements Mr. Brolin’s unlikely rise from character actor to an anchor of three franchises, following his villain turns in “Avengers: Infinity War” and “Deadpool 2.” “Day of the Soldado” was distributed by Sony and financed by Black Label Media for $35 million, and follows an escalating battle between Mexican cartels and the U.S. government. The…

Read More

Review: ‘First Love’ for a Couple of a Certain Age

Edith and Harold, the solitary souls who become a pair in Charles Mee’s pleasingly jagged romantic comedy “First Love,” don’t so much meet cute as meet curmudgeonly. He’s snoozing on a park bench when she happens along and wants to sit. “Shove up,” she tells him, and maybe she’d be less gruff if she knew that they were going to fall for each other — or maybe she’d pass him by altogether if she could see how much pain would be mixed with the devotion. Both in their 60s, they…

Read More

Review: ‘Laura Bush Killed a Guy’ Plumbs a First Lady’s Mysteries

In November 1963, 17-year-old Laura Welch ran a stop sign and crashed into another car, killing its teenage driver. Such accidents don’t usually end up on the animated series “Family Guy,” but that one did — because Laura Welch went on to marry George W. Bush and become first lady of the United States. Now the cartoon’s joke serves as title and throughline for the sneakily engaging solo play “Laura Bush Killed a Guy,” at the Flea Theater. Ian Allen’s comedy is divided into three short sections, each one starting…

Read More

Review: A Conductor Sets Munich’s Ashen ‘Parsifal’ Aflame

MUNICH — “Spring is here,” an old knight declares in the final act of Wagner’s “Parsifal.” Yet wintry night never ends in the grim, ashen new production of the work, which opened the Munich Opera Festival on Thursday. (It will be broadcast live at staatsoper.tv on July 8.) The lights are dim. The sets — based on, and sometimes magnified reproductions of, melancholy ink drawings by the artist Georg Baselitz — are black and white. The performances of a superb cast, led by Jonas Kaufmann, Nina Stemme, Christian Gerhaher, René…

Read More

Behind Lincoln Center’s White Travertine Facade: Infighting and Indecision

Looking forward to Lincoln Center’s namesake festival this summer? It’s been scrapped. Good luck finding the center’s new Hall of Fame that was promised a few years ago: on the back burner. And those long-delayed plans to radically remake the home of the New York Philharmonic? Being rethought. Now on its fourth leader in five years, Lincoln Center — the country’s largest performing arts complex — finds itself suffering from shuffled priorities, financial difficulties and instability at its highest rank during a time when cultural organizations are struggling to retain…

Read More

Q. & A.: Tell Us 5 Things About Your Book: A Close Look at Where Kids Live, Learn and Play

What’s the most surprising thing you learned while writing it? How many women there were involved in the design of childhood. I am a feminist and I write about architecture, and sometimes it’s really difficult, because women haven’t been allowed to have prominent roles in architecture until the very recent past, and even now representation isn’t as good as it should be. It wasn’t hard to make my book inclusive, at least in terms of gender. Many other things I’ve written, I’ve had to look hard and dig. Many of…

Read More

What’s on TV Saturday: ‘It’ and ‘Liquid Science’

Stephen King’s killer clown stalks on HBO. And the rapper GZA’s science show streams on Netflix. What’s on TV IT (2017) 8 p.m. on HBO. “It” opens with a boy in a yellow raincoat floating a paper boat down a flooded suburban street as it rains and ends with an epic battle. Andy Muschietti’s adaptation of Stephen King’s 1986 novel about a group of kids fending off a killer clown layers generous scoops of action atop a base of jump scares — with a sprinkling of late-’80s nostalgia. That mixture…

Read More

The Best Films of 2018, So Far

Advertisement Jeffrey Tambor, left, and Steve Buscemi in “The Death of Stalin.”Creditvia TIFF June 29, 2018 With the long, hot holiday ahead, you may have a chance to catch up on moviegoing. Here are the top films that our chief critics, A.O. Scott and Manohla Dargis, are recommending so far this year: ‘First Reformed’ A preview of the film.Published OnMay 7, 2018 THE STORY This drama, written and directed by Paul Schrader, follows the Rev. Ernst Toller (Ethan Hawke), an upstate New York pastor, as he comes undone after meeting…

Read More

Marcelo Gomes to Return to the New York Stage With Sarasota Ballet

The Sarasota Ballet announced this week that it had engaged the former American Ballet Theater principal dancer Marcelo Gomes to perform as a guest artist. The earliest of his appearances, at the Joyce Theater on Aug. 18, will be his first on a New York stage since he resigned from Ballet Theater in December. His departure, after a 20-year career with the company, came after an accusation of sexual misconduct. Mr. Gomes, in an interview on Friday, declined to discuss the matter, which he has never spoken of publicly. And…

Read More

Critic’s Notebook: Ballet Today, the Good and the Bad, on Display at the Joyce

Ballet is an art of amplitude. For centuries, its physical style has been designed to radiate upward and outward into the farther reaches of opera houses. Nonetheless, it flourishes in smaller spaces too. The Joyce Theater, with a seating capacity of 472, is one of them. Every summer since 2013, the Joyce has presented a ballet festival with many company debuts for the theater (indeed, for New York). This year’s edition, which began on Tuesday and continues through next week, features five troupes. Levels of choreography vary and dance styles…

Read More