Review: ‘First Love’ for a Couple of a Certain Age

Edith and Harold, the solitary souls who become a pair in Charles Mee’s pleasingly jagged romantic comedy “First Love,” don’t so much meet cute as meet curmudgeonly. He’s snoozing on a park bench when she happens along and wants to sit. “Shove up,” she tells him, and maybe she’d be less gruff if she knew that they were going to fall for each other — or maybe she’d pass him by altogether if she could see how much pain would be mixed with the devotion. Both in their 60s, they…

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Review: ‘Laura Bush Killed a Guy’ Plumbs a First Lady’s Mysteries

In November 1963, 17-year-old Laura Welch ran a stop sign and crashed into another car, killing its teenage driver. Such accidents don’t usually end up on the animated series “Family Guy,” but that one did — because Laura Welch went on to marry George W. Bush and become first lady of the United States. Now the cartoon’s joke serves as title and throughline for the sneakily engaging solo play “Laura Bush Killed a Guy,” at the Flea Theater. Ian Allen’s comedy is divided into three short sections, each one starting…

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Vocations: The Art of Making a Bespoke Mattress

After touring with a band in 2000, I was broke and answered an ad for a job at Savoir. In the interview, the owner, Alistair Hughes, asked if I knew how to sew. I was a bit cocky in my answer and added I would be an asset to his company. “We’ll see,” he said, and asked me to stitch some materials as a trial. When I was called with the job offer, I was shocked: I’d never had a full-time job before. What goes into making one of your…

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Review: ‘On a Clear Day,’ Eternally Odd, Gets Yet Another Life

Bizarre subjects are no deal breaker for musicals; think human meat pies and philosophical felines. But few shows have as bewildering a topic as “On a Clear Day You Can See Forever,” the 1965 jaw-dropper about ESP, telekinesis and past-life regression that’s a weird mix of laughably earnest woo-woo and chipper Broadway savvy. For the savvy, we have the score to thank: a treasure trunk of standards with music by Burton Lane and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner. Songs like “Hurry, It’s Lovely Up Here,” “What Did I Have That…

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7 Plays and Musicals to Go to in N.Y.C. This Weekend

Our guide to plays and musicals coming to New York stages and a few last-chance picks of shows that are about to close. Our reviews of open shows are at nytimes.com/reviews/theater. Previews and Openings ‘FIDLER AFN DAKH’ at the Museum of Jewish Heritage (previews start on July 4; opens on July 15). “Fiddler on the Roof” is a theatrical translation of Sholem Aleichem’s Yiddish language tales, and the National Yiddish Theater-Folksbiene has translated it right back, with English and Russian supertitles. Under Joel Grey’s direction, the first Yiddish production of…

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‘Harry Potter and the Cursed Child’ Will Open in San Francisco

“Harry Potter and the Cursed Child” is heading to San Francisco. The Tony-winning play will open at the Curran Theater in fall 2019. This will be the fourth location of the play, following London, New York and an Australian production slated to premiere in Melbourne in early 2019. The play is set 19 years after the conclusion of the final novel in J. K. Rowling’s series, and follows Harry Potter and his son, Albus, who arrives at Hogwarts and must grapple with his famous father’s past, present and future. Written…

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Review: Joyously Rediscovering ‘Songs for a New World’

There are plenty of musicals that welcome every bell and whistle that a director can throw at them — shows that, in the spareness of a concert performance, set spectators to dreaming about how gorgeous a full production might be. Then there are rarer creatures that demand simplicity above all — shows that find their true best form in concert. Jason Robert Brown’s “Songs for a New World” is one of these, currently flourishing in a glorious Encores! Off-Center iteration, savvily directed by Kate Whoriskey at New York City Center.…

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Glenda Jackson to Return to Broadway in ‘King Lear’

Glenda Jackson, who won a Tony Award this month for her much-lauded performance in Edward Albee’s “Three Tall Women,” will return to Broadway next spring as the title character in a new production of Shakespeare’s “King Lear.” Ms. Jackson previously played Lear in a 2016 production at the Old Vic in London. The Broadway staging, produced by Scott Rudin, will be a new one, with a creative team that has not yet been named; it is scheduled to begin previews March 6 and open April 11 at an unspecified theater.…

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Paris Theater: Molière the Entertainer vs. Serious Molière

It’s not a bad premise: When Elise and her brother, Cléante, lament their father’s stinginess, clad in the hip Parisian’s uniform of skinny jeans and neutral colors, they sound like millennials unable to get on the property ladder without a parental leg up. Harpagon, meanwhile, upgrades to surveillance technology to keep an eye on the cash box he has buried in the garden, with a camera trained on the spot. Mr. Lagarde had a very talented cast to work with. Christèle Tual grabs every opportunity for physical comedy as the…

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Review: Bad Girl Makes Good in a Glorious ‘Carmen Jones’

As for Carmen herself, Ms. Rose, a Tony winner for “Caroline, or Change,” more than makes good on her character’s boast, that when she loves someone, “my baby, that’s the end of you.” Wearing snug, flame-color dresses (Ann Hould-Ward is the costume designer), her hips rolling like waves in a gentle surf, Ms. Rose nails the contemptuous arrogance of the sexiest girl in a small town. But she gives Carmen the provincial girl’s naïve hunger for — and fear of — a bigger, more glamorous life. This discrepancy is reflected…

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