Parents will spend an average of almost $600 on back to school supplies for each of their children

Australian parents are expected to spend nearly $600 on school supplies per child during the back to school rush as prices increase by a shocking 10 per cent from last year. 

The Back to School 2020 Report, conducted by YouGov on behalf of Big W, revealed parents can expect to spend an average of $592 on school supplies per child, compared to $538 last year. 

Technology devices and sports gear are the most expensive items. 

Parents are expected to pay almost $600 per child for school suppplies this year (stock image)

Parents are expected to pay almost $600 per child for school suppplies this year (stock image)

Families are encouraged to have a plan and budget before their back to school shopping trip (pictured: stock image)

Families are encouraged to have a plan and budget before their back to school shopping trip (pictured: stock image) 

Parents can now expect to spend an average of $284 on laptops, headphones and other technology items per child, a 17 per cent increase from 2019.   

The category is expected to increase in price each year as classrooms make more use of digital platforms, Officeworks told Newscorp.  

‘They anticipate further growth in the technology space with increases in laptops, tablets and headphones as schools move their learning to interactive and digital platforms,’ a spokesman said.  

Expected Costs for School Items 

School uniforms – $180

School shoes – $111

Stationery – $92

School bags – $58

Lunch boxes and water bottles – $43 

All other items including sporting gear – $108

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When sporting gear is added to the list, families can expect a hefty $970 bill per child for the 2021 school year, an increase of 12% compared to 2020. 

Best-selling author and money educator Vanessa Stoykov said parents need to ensure they have a clear plan before they shop to ensure they get the best deals. 

‘Have a clear path, plan your costs now, as it puts less pressure on you financially’, she said. 

The report found that to reduce costs, 29% of Aussie parents will be more open to sourcing second-hand supplies, with 16% making back to school items part of their children’s Christmas gifts. 

These new money-saving measures have become more important than ever to parents, as the COVID-19 pandemic has made families hyper aware of their savings and budgets.

According to the Back to School report, 70% of parents said value for money was the most important factor to consider when shopping, with addordability and quality of products tied at 53%. 

But only seven in ten parents with children aged five to 17 have a ‘back to school budget’. 

Stoykov recommends parents use online shopping to their advantage. 

‘Take advantage of online shopping, it saves you time and lets you compare prices’, she said. 

Schools bags are expected to cost parents aruond $58 (pictured: stock image)

School shoes are expected to fetch up to $111 per child for Australian parents (pictured: stock image)

Schools bags are expected to cost up to $58 (pictured, left), and school shoes will set parents back approximately $111 per child (pictured, right)

Durign the coronavirus pandemic, parents have said value for money when buying school supplies is the most important factor to consider (pictured: stock photo of young girl looking at notebook)

Durign the coronavirus pandemic, parents have said value for money when buying school supplies is the most important factor to consider (pictured: stock photo of young girl looking at notebook) 

Retailers including Big W, Target, Officeworks and supermarkets including Coles and Woolworths now have back to school items stocked.

Families can purchase supplies through Officeworks’ School List Service online, where parents can create a school list, compare and edit the products with the best price, and then order via Click & Collect. 

The addition of sporting gear (pictured) can result in a hefty $970 bill per child for the 2021 school year

The addition of sporting gear (pictured) can result in a hefty $970 bill per child for the 2021 school year

 

 

 

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