Parking dispute takes ridiculous turn as people add notes to resident’s car Northern Beaches

Neighbourhood dispute over parking takes a ridiculous turn as people continually add notes to one resident’s car: ‘Just here for the drama!’

  • Comical stoush over Sydney parking conducted via passive-aggressive notes
  • Four signs stuck to a single hatch-back that neighbours felt was in the wrong
  • Parking gripes are a common complaint between Sydney neighbours

A neighbourhood parking dispute has escalated to comical levels with passive-aggressive notes being pasted all over a car that offended one resident.

A frustrated local on Sydney‘s Northern Beaches typed out and printed a cranky sign – in bold lettering – accusing a neighbour of spitefully buying a car and trailer just so they could block others from finding a park.

The first note-writer jammed the message under the rear wipers of their neighbour’s Toyota hatchback, before three others followed – the last with a message trolling all concerned.

But that was just the start as the conflict spilled into the neighbourhood’s community Facebook page. 

A neighbourhood parking dispute has escalated to comical levels with passive-aggressive notes being pasted all over a car that offended one resident

A neighbourhood parking dispute has escalated to comical levels with passive-aggressive notes being pasted all over a car that offended one resident

The first note-writer jammed the message under the rear wipers of their neighbour's Toyota hatchback, before three others followed - the last with a message trolling all concerned.

The first note-writer jammed the message under the rear wipers of their neighbour’s Toyota hatchback, before three others followed – the last with a message trolling all concerned.

‘Buying a trailer and car solely to block others from parking at the right of your driveway is inconsiderate – you have a double garage plus an empty car space,’ the first note lectured.

It continued: ‘This is a public road with a shortage of parking. If everybody acted the same there would be nowhere to park.’

The hatchback in question appeared to have no number plate, which technically makes it illegal to park on a public street. 

Perhaps a little creepily, the writer included the hatchback driver’s specific address. 

Obviously a neighbour concurred, handwriting an enthusiastic follow-up – in capital letters – and taped it to the first note.

‘AGREED!’

‘You try driving around looking for parking after a long day at work.’

Then a third resident chimed in.

They wrote yet another message, on what resembled a gigantic post-it note, and securing it to the second sign.

‘We agree!!’

‘It would be great if we all work together as neighbours to make it easier for everyone to park close to their home.’

Then a fourth note-writer joined in with a classic troll that wouldn’t go astray in a  Facebook pile-on.

‘JUST HERE FOR THE DRAMA,’ they wrote, with a drawing of a steaming cup of coffee on the same sheet.

Oddly, the street in question was much wider and longer than many older and more narrow Sydney streets where neighbours manage to get by

Oddly, the street in question was much wider and longer than many older and more narrow Sydney streets where neighbours manage to get by

On the locals’ Facebook community page – for Narrabeen, Elanora and Ingleside – members relentlessly heckled each other.

‘Call the council, The car has no plates on it. They will get it towed. Please post pics of trailer, I may be in the market for a new one,’ one man said.

One woman claimed her neighbours placed cones in front of his house when he was at work so no-one took ‘his’ spot. 

‘It doesn’t effect us, it’s across the road, but who does that!’

One woman recounted a horror story of the response she got when she parked in front of someone else’s house.

‘We had our tyres let down, our cars covered in wet sand, I got parked in, all if we dared to park in front of other peoples houses on the street – which isn’t even illegal? 

‘When I got parked in I had to go ask the woman to let me out and she lectured me on “how dare I” park in front of her house.’

Parking gripes commonly arise when people nick a vacant space outside someone else’s house and that person objects.

It is often exacerbated when trade vehicles arrive or neighbours park extra vehicles on the street, such as boats and trailers – even though they are legally allowed to, so long as the cars are registered. 

Oddly, the street in question was much wider and longer than many older and more narrow Sydney streets where neighbours manage to get by. 

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