Police will NOT stop Drug lord Curtis Warren returning to Liverpool

Police will NOT stop Drug lord Curtis Warren returning to Liverpool – where he’s believed to have buried millions from his £200M criminal enterprise in back gardens and flower beds – over fears it may violate his human rights

  • The gangster was freed from high security prison HMP Whitemoor yesterday
  • He will face strict measures including being banned from from using WhatsApp
  • The gangster is rumoured to have millions of pounds sealed in bags in Liverpool 

Drug kingpin Curtis Warren will be allowed to resettle in Liverpool, where he ran his £200million cocaine empire, so as not to violate his human rights.

The 59-year-old gangster was freed from high security prison HMP Whitemoor yesterday having being sentenced to 13-years in 2009 for a multimillion pound cannabis smuggling plot.

He will face a host of strict measures including being banned from from using WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger and from using cryptocurrency such as Bitcoin.

Warren will also have to give a day’s notice ahead of usual day-to-day activities such as being a passenger in someone’s car or van.

However he is free to head back to his home city where police fear his return may galvanise the region’s criminal underworld.

The gangster is rumoured to have millions of pounds sealed in bags and buried under gardens all over Liverpool.

He has homes all over the world, including a 16-room mansion in the Netherlands and a winery in Bulgaria, but a source at the National Crime Agency said the decision to let him relocate to Merseyside was to stop the matter being dragged through the courts in Strasbourg.

Warren also owned a home in West Kirby, Merseyside, although it’s current status is unclear.  

Drug kingpin Curtis Warren will be allowed to resettle in Liverpool, where he ran his £200million cocaine empire, so as not to violate his human rights. Above: Warren (right) is seen with alleged co-conspirator Jonathan Welsh at Jersey airport. Warren was jailed for 13 years over a plot to smuggle £1million of cannabis into Jersey

Drug kingpin Curtis Warren will be allowed to resettle in Liverpool, where he ran his £200million cocaine empire, so as not to violate his human rights. Above: Warren (right) is seen with alleged co-conspirator Jonathan Welsh at Jersey airport. Warren was jailed for 13 years over a plot to smuggle £1million of cannabis into Jersey

The source added: ‘Preventing him from entering Liverpool was regarded a possible human rights violation.’

Warren is unlikely to be supervised in Liverpool by probation services because he served his sentence in full but he will be the subject of a Serious Crime Prevention Order, which will restrict his ability to do every day tasks.

And he will be watched by the NCA’s lifetime management team, who are in charge of upholding the crime prevention order for the next five years.

Warren will not have a curfew and can apply for a British passport.

He can also have a mobile phone – although In a bid to prevent any suspicious activity, he can only use one sim card and one phone number.

It is also understood that he cannot hold more than £1,000 in cash, even in coins – and he will be closely watched when trying to borrow money, hold trusts or shares, or make transfers. 

Warren is rumoured to have millions of pounds sealed in bags and buried under gardens all over Liverpool. Above: One of the several homes that Warren owned in Merseyside is seen above. Warren was born in Liverpool in 1963

Warren is rumoured to have millions of pounds sealed in bags and buried under gardens all over Liverpool. Above: One of the several homes that Warren owned in Merseyside is seen above. Warren was born in Liverpool in 1963

Warren is rumoured to have hidden some of his vast wealth in plastic bags all over Liverpool.

In 1998, £1million in cash was dug up from the flowerbed from the garden of drug dealer and Warren’s mentor Philip Glennon.

A drugs lord who was once described as Britain's Pablo Escobar has been freed from a maximum security prison after 14 years. Curtis 'Cocky' Warren, 59, was yesterday freed from Whitemoor Jail in Cambridgeshire

Warren is free to head back to his home city where police fear his return may galvanise the region’s criminal underworld 

But paper £20 and £50 notes ceased to be legal tender in September this year, whilst the paper £10 note was withdrawn from circulation in March 2018. 

It means that, for it to be usable now, Warren’s money would need to be taken to a bank and exchanged for the plastic polymer notes that replaced the paper ones – unless an associate has already exchanged the hidden money for legal cash. 

Speaking to a BBC podcast called Gangster: The Story of Curtis Warren, one of the police officers who dug up the money told how he believed the cash was Warren’s.

Steve Kyle said: ‘We dug up the garden of Philip Glennon and there in plastic bags was a million pounds. I know it was a million pounds because I counted it.

‘I took it to the Midland Bank on Dale Street. I spent three days there counting it.’

Glennon would not say where the cash came from but Kyle said: ‘It was probably off Curtis Warren.

‘They are crazy, they can’t put it in the bank. They can’t put anything in the bank.’

Curtis Warren arriving to a hearing at the Royal Court in Jersey in October 2009

Curtis Warren arriving to a hearing at the Royal Court in Jersey in October 2009

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