Poll: Three quarters of Americans say Thanksgiving is NOT the time to discuss politics with family

Three-quarters of Americans say Thanksgiving is NOT the time to discuss politics with family, poll reveals: Just one-third say they’ll discuss midterm results with loved ones

  • A new poll from Axios shows that three in four Americans are hoping to avoid political conversations at Thanksgiving 
  • A Quinnipiac poll found 50 percent of Americans expect political divisions to worsen over the next year, while just seven percent expect divisions to ease 
  • The Axios poll found that just one-third are looking forward to discussing the results of the midterm elections 
  • The polls come after a tumultuous midterm election where Democrats maintained control of the Senate but Republicans took back the House 

Three in four Americans say they are hoping to avoid political conversations at the Thanksgiving dinner table this year, according to a new poll. 

Research from Axios found that 77 percent of Americans do not want to talk about the controversial topic this year, while just one in four, 23 percent, look forward to political discussions. 

This comes as a Quinnipiac poll found that half of all Americans said they expect political divisions to worsen over the coming year. 

40 percent said they don’t expect the climate to change while just seven percent believe that divisions will ease between now and next year. 

Less than one-fourth of Americans said they are looking forward to discussing the results of the midterm elections at Thanksgiving

Less than one-fourth of Americans said they are looking forward to discussing the results of the midterm elections at Thanksgiving 

President Joe Biden recently pardoned several turkeys ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday

President Joe Biden recently pardoned several turkeys ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday 

Former President Donald Trump during a turkey pardoning held during his term

Former President Donald Trump during a turkey pardoning held during his term

The poll results come after a tumultuous midterm election where Democrats maintained control of the Senate but Republicans took back the House. 

Quinnipiac also found that 59 percent of Americans think Americans are not respectful to each other, while 38 percent said that they are, for the most part. 

That number is preceded by a shocking 73 percent who said they believe U.S. citizens are less respectful than they were 10 years ago. 

17 percent said they think the level of respect hasn’t changed, and just eight percent think Americans are more respectful now. 

When asked about the presidential bid announced last week by former President Donald Trump, nearly 60 percent of Americans said they think Trump running is a ‘bad thing.’ 

Overwhelmingly, nine in 10 Democrats said it’s a bad thing for the former president to make another pass at The White House. Nearly six in 10 independents say they think Trump running is bad. 

On the other hand, 62 percent of Republicans said Trump running is actually a good thing for the country. 

Fifty-five percent of Americans said they think Trump had a mainly negative impact on the Republican party, while 70 percent of actual Republicans think he helped the party, overall. 

This graph shows the number of Americans who plan to discuss and avoid politics this year at Thanksgiving

This graph shows the number of Americans who plan to discuss and avoid politics this year at Thanksgiving 

Nearly 60 percent of Americans said they think former President Donald Trump running in 2024 is a 'bad thing.' More than 60 percent of Republicans, however, said they think a Trump run would be good for the country

Nearly 60 percent of Americans said they think former President Donald Trump running in 2024 is a ‘bad thing.’ More than 60 percent of Republicans, however, said they think a Trump run would be good for the country

‘An underwhelming welcome back to the political battlefield for Donald Trump comes with a mixed message…nearly 60 percent of Americans say they do not want to see him back in the Oval Office, but nearly half of Americans think it’s likely,’ said Quinnipiac University Polling Analyst Tim Malloy.

Additionally, 43 percent of Americans when asked said they would prefer Florida Governor Ron DeSantis is the Republican nominee in 2024 over Trump. 

Within the Republican party, the vote between Trump and Desantis is a dead split.  

44 percent said they would prefer to see Trump on the ballot while another 44 percent said they prefer DeSantis. 

Republicans appeared split on who they would want to see on the ballot in 2024 with 44 percent saying they want it to be former President Donald Trump and another 44 percent saying they would prefer Florida Governor Ron DeSantis

Republicans appeared split on who they would want to see on the ballot in 2024 with 44 percent saying they want it to be former President Donald Trump and another 44 percent saying they would prefer Florida Governor Ron DeSantis 

43 percent of all Americans said they would prefer to see DeSantis on the ballot in 2024 over former President Donald Trump

43 percent of all Americans said they would prefer to see DeSantis on the ballot in 2024 over former President Donald Trump

Among the most important issues to Americans, inflation remains top of mind, according to Quinnipiac respondents. 

35 percent of citizens said the state of the economy is their number one concern. No other issue asked about reached double digits. 

54 percent of Republicans said inflation is their top issue, with immigration at 15 percent. 

38 percent of independents agreed, saying inflation is their number one concern. 

The top issue for Democrats includes climate change (16 percent), gun violence (16 percent), inflation (15 percent), abortion (12 percent), and racial inequality (10 percent). 

The number one issue for most Americans this year is inflation, according to a Quinnipiac poll

The number one issue for most Americans this year is inflation, according to a Quinnipiac poll

The Hill spoke with clinical psychologist Dr. Lauren Cook who said that for those who find themselves in a political discussion, the best thing to do is listen and hear the other person out. 

‘When we get defensive or feel like someone is misunderstanding us, our walls can quickly go up,’ said Cook. 

‘Rather than jump to what your next response will be, practice responding rather than reacting.’

One of the most important things to do if you do begin to fight with a friend or loved one at the dinner table is also ‘ask yourself if you want to maintain a relationship with this person,’ Cook said. 

Most Americans say they prefer not to discuss politics at the dinner table this Thanksgiving

Most Americans say they prefer not to discuss politics at the dinner table this Thanksgiving

‘If the answer is yes, then you can practice holding that it’s okay to love someone deeply and still deeply agree with them. Both can be true at the same time.’

If all else fails, the psychologist suggests taking a break from the conversation or the person altogether. 

‘If you find you’re getting so activated that you may lash out or feel deeply wounded, then create some space for yourself,’ she said. 

‘Whether it’s changing the subject, walking into another room, or leaving altogether.’ 

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