Princess Eugenie and Princess Beatrice look distraught at Queen’s State Funeral

Princess Eugenie and Princess Beatrice fight back tears as they watch their grandmother’s coffin depart from Westminster Abbey following her State Funeral

  • Queen’s granddaughters Princess Beatrice, 34, and Eugenie, 32, looked somber at Westminster Abbey 
  • The two royals attended the Monarch’s State Funeral with their husbands and members of royal family   
  • Distraught Eugenie and Beatrice fought back tears as watched Queen’s coffin take on final London procession

The Queen’s granddaughters appeared to fight back tears as they bid her farewell during her State Funeral in London today.  

The Duke of York’s daughters Princess Beatrice, 34, and Eugenie, 32, attended the late Monarch’s funeral at Westminster Abbey with the royal family this morning. 

As the sisters watched the Queen’s coffin depart the Abbey, they appeared emotional and stood close to one another. 

Their father Prince Andrew looked visibly emotional as he sat in the front row with the King and their siblings Princess Anne and Prince Edward during the ceremony. 

Meanwhile, their mother Sarah Ferguson also, who shared a heartfelt tribute to the Queen when she passed on September 8, was also in attendance, marking her first public appearance since the monarch’s death. 

Both dressed in black, Eugenie and Beatrice were also joined by their husbands, Jack Brooksbank and Edo Mapelli Mozzi, and the other members of the Royal Family, during the difficult service. 

The Queen's granddaughters Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie appeared to fight back tears as they bid her farewell during her State Funeral in London today

The Queen’s granddaughters Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie appeared to fight back tears as they bid her farewell during her State Funeral in London today 

The two Princesses looked deep in thought as they were seen leaving Westminster Abbey following their grandmother's funeral

The two Princesses looked deep in thought as they were seen leaving Westminster Abbey following their grandmother’s funeral 

Throughout the past 10 days of mourning, the sisters have appeared deeply emotional and have often openly been weeping at events.

On Saturday, they attended a vigil at Westminster Hall in London, which saw the Queen’s children – King Charles, Princess Anne, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward –  repeat the ceremonial Vigil of Princes that they first carried out at St Giles’ Cathedral in Edinburgh as the Queen lies in state.

As they stood around the casket, other members of the royal family, including Queen Consort Camilla, watched in solemn silence from the stands. 

And in the statement released over the weekend, Beatrice and Eugenie said: ‘Dearest Grannie, We’ve not been able to put much into words since you left us all. There have been tears and laughter, silences and chatter, hugs and loneliness, and a collective loss for you, our beloved Queen and our beloved Grannie.

‘We, like many, thought you’d be here forever. And we all miss you terribly. You were our matriarch, our guide, our loving hand on our backs leading us through this world. You taught us so much and we will cherish those lessons and memories forever.

‘For now dear Grannie, all we want to say is thank you. Thank you for making us laugh, for including us, for picking heather and raspberries, for marching soldiers, for our teas, for comfort, for joy. You, being you, will never know the impact you have had on our family and so many people around the world.

Both wearing black, the daughters of the Duke of York stood side-by-side following the emotional ceremony at Westminster Abbey today

Both wearing black, the daughters of the Duke of York stood side-by-side following the emotional ceremony at Westminster Abbey today

The Duke of York's daughters, who both appeared deeply  moved as they stood outside the Abbey this afternoon following the event

The Duke of York’s daughters, who both appeared deeply  moved as they stood outside the Abbey this afternoon following the event 

The sisters, who are deeply close and paid tribute to their grandmother over the weekend, stood side-by-side following the event today

The sisters, who are deeply close and paid tribute to their grandmother over the weekend, stood side-by-side following the event today 

Eugenie and Beatrice put on a brave smile as they were seen leaving the Abbey following the emotional ceremony for their grandmother today

Eugenie and Beatrice put on a brave smile as they were seen leaving the Abbey following the emotional ceremony for their grandmother today

Both wearing black, the two sister appeared deep in thought as they left the Abbey, with both their husbands riding separately

Both wearing black, the two sister appeared deep in thought as they left the Abbey, with both their husbands riding separately  

Beatrice, the Duke of York's eldest, waved at royal fans who had come to pay their respects to the late Monarch this afternoon

Beatrice, the Duke of York’s eldest, waved at royal fans who had come to pay their respects to the late Monarch this afternoon  

The King and Queen Consort looked grave as they bid farewell to the Queen's coffin as it departed from the Wellington Arch this afternoon

The King and Queen Consort looked grave as they bid farewell to the Queen’s coffin as it departed from the Wellington Arch this afternoon 

The Queen's coffin was escorted to the Wellington Arch before it left London for the last time, heading to Windsor, where she will be buried tonight

The Queen’s coffin was escorted to the Wellington Arch before it left London for the last time, heading to Windsor, where she will be buried tonight  

A grief-stricken King Charles watched on as his mother left Wellington Arch, with the Queen Consort standing by his side during the emotional moment

A grief-stricken King Charles watched on as his mother left Wellington Arch, with the Queen Consort standing by his side during the emotional moment 

The King, who appeared visibly distraught during the London ceremony, will be travelling to Windsor, where his mother will be buried privately tonight

The King, who appeared visibly distraught during the London ceremony, will be travelling to Windsor, where his mother will be buried privately tonight 

‘The world mourns you and the tributes would really make you smile. They are all too true of the remarkable leader you are.

‘We’re so happy you’re back with Grandpa. Goodbye dear Grannie, it has been the honour of our lives to have been your granddaughters and we’re so very proud of you.

‘We know that dear Uncle Charles, the King, will continue to lead in your example as he too has dedicated his life to service.

‘God save the King. With our love, Beatrice and Eugenie.’

King Charles III and his grief-stricken family surrounded the Queen’s coffin at her state funeral in Westminster Abbey in a moving and majestic farewell to the late monarch today.

Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie stood outside alongside other royals including Meghan Markle, Camilla, Prince George, Kate Middleton, Princess Charlotte and Sophie Wessex

Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie stood outside alongside other royals including Meghan Markle, Camilla, Prince George, Kate Middleton, Princess Charlotte and Sophie Wessex 

Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie of York stood outside the Abbey this afternoon and appeared deeply emotional as they watched the procession

Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie of York stood outside the Abbey this afternoon and appeared deeply emotional as they watched the procession  

Her Majesty made her final and saddest journey to Westminster Abbey from Westminster Hall as Britain mourned its longest-serving monarch and the royals bade goodbye to a beloved mother, grandmother and great-grandmother.

Her coffin was placed close to the altar with her crown, orb and sceptre on its top surrounded by flowers chosen by the King from gardens she loved. 

The Archbishop of Canterbury then hailed the Queen’s ‘abundant life and loving service’ as he delivered the sermon at her state funeral, adding: ‘She was joyful, present to so many, touching a multitude of lives.’

Prince Charles looked tearful while his sister looked at him with concern and care before fixing her own stare on her mother’s coffin and crown. 

Eugenie and Beatrice exited the Church, following their cousin Zara Tindall, 41 and her husband Mike, who were holding hands

Eugenie and Beatrice exited the Church, following their cousin Zara Tindall, 41 and her husband Mike, who were holding hands 

The UK’s most important church, packed with 2,000 VIPs including prime ministers, presidents and the Queen’s family, was serene aside from the sound of hymns and prayers in a funeral service Her Majesty has curated herself before she died.

On an highly emotional occasion for Britain and the world, the Queen was carried in her oak coffin to the gun carriage used by her parents and was followed through Parliament Square by her son, the King, and her relatives including the Prince of Wales and Duke of Sussex. Andrew, the Duke of York, appeared to be crying. Outside  the Abbey an estimated 2million people are in central London along procession routes and watching on big screens.

The State Gun Carriage carrying the Queen’s coffin began its funeral procession from the Palace of Westminster to Westminster Abbey at around 10.45am, arriving just before 11am. A single toll from Big Ben signalled the start of the service at Westminster Abbey, where kings and queens have been crowned and buried since 1066. Her Majesty will be laid to rest at Windsor next to her beloved husband Prince Philip and her parents, George VI and the Queen Mother.

The new Monarch was overcome with emotions during his mother's state funeral before her coffin was carried out of the Abbey

The new Monarch was overcome with emotions during his mother’s state funeral before her coffin was carried out of the Abbey

The King looked visibly upset during the ceremony, as did the Duke of Sussex. Princess Beatrice was seen looking at her uncle in support

The King looked visibly upset during the ceremony, as did the Duke of Sussex. Princess Beatrice was seen looking at her uncle in support 

King Charles and his siblings and the other members of the royal family all looked deep in thought as they stood in front of the Monarch's coffin

King Charles and his siblings and the other members of the royal family all looked deep in thought as they stood in front of the Monarch’s coffin 

The Queen's children, who sat in the front row with their spouses, were overcome with emotion during the Monarch's state funeral today

The Queen’s children, who sat in the front row with their spouses, were overcome with emotion during the Monarch’s state funeral today 

The King, visibly emotional, closed his eyes for a moment of reflection while the congregation sang during his mother's funeral

The King, visibly emotional, closed his eyes for a moment of reflection while the congregation sang during his mother’s funeral 

Despite the huge crowds, there was absolute silence as around 200 pipers and drummers of Scottish and Irish Regiments, the Brigade of Gurkhas and RAF played as the procession went through Parliament Square. The Queen’s own piper played a lament that echoed through the heart of London.

Walking behind the carriage were the King and his siblings, followed by the Prince of Wales, Duke of Sussex and Peter Phillips. The State Gun Carriage has also been previously used for the funerals of King Edward VII, King George V, King George VI, Winston Churchill, and Lord Mountbatten.

There was complete silence from the crowd close to Parliament Square, as the State Gun Carriage carrying the Queen’s coffin slowly moved past. The crowd, momentarily still and with phones held aloft to capture the moment, was around 10-people thick in places, as tens of thousands thronged the streets to say goodbye to the monarch and witness a moment of history.

Prince George and Princess Charlotte travelled to Westminster Abbey in the same car as the Queen Consort, with the Princess of Wales arriving with them. They arrived at the church shortly after some of the Queen’s grandchildren including Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie.

World leaders including Joe Biden and Emmanuel Macron arrived at Westminster Abbey around an hour before the service began. The congregation of 2,000 sat in solemn silence as Her Majesty arrived. 

Last night, Camilla paid a tribute to the late Queen, recalling her ‘wonderful blue eyes’ and saying: ‘I will always remember her smile.’ 

She spoke warmly of her admiration for her mother-in-law, and for the way she carved out a role while being in the difficult position of a ‘solitary woman’ in a man’s world in a pre-recorded BBC broadcast.  

‘She has been part of our lives for ever. I’m 75 now and I can’t remember anyone except the Queen being there,’ she said.

‘It must have been so difficult for her being a solitary woman. There weren’t women Prime Ministers or Presidents. She was the only one, so I think she carved her own role.’

Remembering her personal connection to the Queen, Camilla added: ‘She’s got those wonderful blue eyes… when she smiles they light up her whole face. I will always remember her smile. That smile is unforgettable.’

The Queen gave Camilla her strongest sign of support when, on the 70th anniversary of her accession to the throne in February, she expressed her ‘sincere wish’ that once Charles became King, his wife should be known as Queen Consort.

The intervention ended years of debate over what Camilla – Charles’s mistress before they married in 2005 – would eventually be called. It also made clear that any criticism of Camilla, who had been blamed for the breakdown of Charles’s marriage to Diana, was firmly in the past.

Camilla was made a Privy Counsellor in 2016 ahead of the Queen’s official 90th birthday. This meant that she was by her husband’s side when he was officially declared King.

Her Royal Highness has joined the King on a tour of the UK this week, with the couple visiting England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in the wake of the Queen’s death. 

Crowds lined the streets of the UK’s nations during the new monarchs visit on the run-up to his late mother’s state funeral at Westminster Abbey and burial at St George’s Chapel in Windsor on Monday- following her death at Balmoral on Thursday aged 96.

Her Majesty’s coffin will travelled ceremonial procession along a detailed route through London and then Windsor before she is laid to rest.   

King Charles III lead his family members – including Princes William and Harry – walking behind the Queen’s coffin as it was moved Westminster Hall to Westminster Abbey for the funeral service.

Hundreds of thousands of Brits have queued to see the Queen lying in state this week, as the official period of mourning ends today.

Well-wishers waited for up to thirty hours to pay tribute as people from around the world sent their condolences to the longest running head of state .

Dignitaries from the commonwealth including Australia, New Zealand and Canada will join the Firm in mourning today, as well as monarchs from across Europe and the world.

After the State Funeral Service finishes at around midday, the coffin was placed on the State Gun Carriage outside the Abbey.

At 12.15pm, the procession set off for Wellington Arch at Hyde Park Corner.

The route travelled from the Abbey via Broad Sanctuary, Parliament Square (south and east sides), Parliament Street, Whitehall, Horse Guards including Horse Guards Arch, Horse Guards Road, The Mall, Queen’s Gardens (south and west sides), Constitution Hill and Apsley Way

At Wellington Arch, the Queen’s coffin will be transferred from the State Gun Carriage to the State Hearse just after 1pm, ahead of the journey to Windsor.

It then will travel from central London to Windsor, on a route that has not been disclosed by the Palace. When the hearse arrives in Windsor, the procession will begin just after 3pm at Shaw Farm Gate on Albert Road.

The state hearse will join the procession, which will have been formed up and in position, at Shaw Farm Gate before travelling to St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle.

The procession will follow the route of Albert Road, Long Walk, Cambridge Gate, Cambridge Drive, George IV Gate, Quadrangle (south and west sides), Engine Court, Norman Arch, Chapel Hill, Parade Ground and Horseshoe Cloister Arch.

Just before 4pm, the procession will halt at the bottom of the West Steps of St George’s Chapel in Horseshoe Cloister. Here, the bearer party will carry the coffin in procession up the steps into the chapel.

The Queen will be interred during a private burial at King George VI Memorial Chapel in St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle at 7.30pm.

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