Public will be able to tour the official residences of His Majesty The King from Thursday

Windsor Castle and other royal residences are set to open again for tours – but Buckingham Palace State Rooms and Platinum Jubilee displays will stay off limits for visitors until 2023

  • Officials have confirmed The Queen’s Gallery at Buckingham Palace, the Palace of Holyroodhouse and The Queen’s Gallery in Edinburgh to reopen on Thursday 
  • Windsor Castle, where the Committal Service for the Queen was held with family members and friends on Monday, will reopen on September 29th
  •  However, the State Rooms at Buckingham Palace and the Royal Mews will not reopen to the public again this year
  • The Queen’s funeral: All the latest Royal Family news and coverage

Despite members of the royal family holding a period of private mourning following the Queen‘s funeral on Monday, the general public will be able to once again tour some of the royal residences from Thursday. 

Palace officials have confirmed that The Queen’s Gallery at Buckingham Palace, the Palace of Holyroodhouse and The Queen’s Gallery in Edinburgh will reopen to visitors on September 22nd. 

Meanwhile, Windsor Castle, where the Committal Service for the Queen was held with family members and friends on Monday, will reopen on September 29th.

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Windsor Castle, where the committal service was held for Her late Majesty the Queen on Monday, will reopen on September 29th

Windsor Castle, where the committal service was held for Her late Majesty the Queen on Monday, will reopen on September 29th

The Queen's Gallery in Buckingham Palace will be back open to the public on Thursday, 22 September

The Queen’s Gallery in Buckingham Palace will be back open to the public on Thursday, 22 September 

Meanwhile, The Queen's Gallery at the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh will also reopen to the public on Thursday (Pictured: The Cairo to Constantinople Early Photographs of the Middle East exhibition)

Meanwhile, The Queen’s Gallery at the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh will also reopen to the public on Thursday (Pictured: The Cairo to Constantinople Early Photographs of the Middle East exhibition)

However, there is bad news for those hoping to still access the State Rooms at Buckingham Palace and the Royal Mews; neither will reopen to the public again this year.

The special displays at Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle and the Palace of Holyroodhouse marking the Platinum Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II will not reopen.

However, the exhibition Masterpieces from Buckingham Palace at The Queen’s Gallery, Edinburgh will be extended until Monday, 31 October.

Windsor Castle traditionally opens between March 1st and October 31st, and is likely to see thousands of visitors making a pilgrimage to the late Queen’s beloved home in the coming weeks.

Following the death of the Queen on 8 September at Balmoral Castle, the Royal Family’s website confirmed parts of royal residences that would normally be open to the public would close for a period of mourning.

The website read: ‘It is His Majesty The King’s wish that a period of Royal Mourning be observed from now until seven days after The Queen’s Funeral.’

Following the death of Her Majesty the Queen, His Majesty King Charles III declared all royal residences would be closed to the public to observe a period of mourning (Pictured: The Queen's Gallery at Buckingham Palace)

Following the death of Her Majesty the Queen, His Majesty King Charles III declared all royal residences would be closed to the public to observe a period of mourning (Pictured: The Queen’s Gallery at Buckingham Palace)

The Palace of Holyroodhouse (pictured during the Ceremony of the Keys) was closed to the public during a period of mourning. The Queen's children took part in a procession behind their mother's coffin as it was led in a harse to St Giles' Cathedral, where Her late Majesty lay in state

The Palace of Holyroodhouse (pictured during the Ceremony of the Keys) was closed to the public during a period of mourning. The Queen’s children took part in a procession behind their mother’s coffin as it was led in a harse to St Giles’ Cathedral, where Her late Majesty lay in state 

The statement added: ‘Royal Mourning will be observed by Members of the Royal Family, Royal Household staff and Representatives of the Royal Household on official duties, together with troops committed to Ceremonial Duties.’

Meanwhile, flags on royal residences flew at half mast after the passing of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.

The state funeral of the Queen was held at Westminster Abbey on Monday and was attended by some 2,000 guests including royal families and leaders from around the world.

Following the state funeral, a committal service was held at St George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle in the afternoon, before the Royal Family gathered there again at 7.30pm for a private, more intimate burial service where Her Majesty was laid to rest.

Queen Elizabeth II was buried at the King George VI Memorial Chapel in Windsor, where she will lie in eternity with Prince Philip, her husband of 73 years, King George VI, The Queen Mother and Princess Margaret. 

It is estimated up to 2million people crowded into central London to see the coffin after the state funeral at Westminster Abbey.

Mourners covered the royal hearse in flowers as it travelled to Windsor from Wellington Arch after the Queen was carried past Buckingham Palace for a final time. 

As the Queen’s coffin was transferred to Windsor Castle mourners continued to line the streets as it passed along the Long Walk towards St George’s Chapel.

The Queen’s beloved corgis Muick and Sandy and one of her favourite ever horses made a special poignant appearance at Windsor during the procession.

The young dogs – one on a red lead and one on a blue lead – were brought out into the quadrangle by two pages in red tailcoats for the arrival of the Queen’s coffin.

Emma, the Queen’s Fell Pony, had greeted the procession, standing on grass in a gap in the floral tributes along the Long Walk in honour of her late owner.

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