Quaint two-bedroom Cornish cottage in Port Isaac’s famous ‘Squeeze Belly Alley’ on sale for £525,000

You’ll need to hold your stomach in! Quaint two-bedroom Cornish cottage in Port Isaac’s famous ‘Squeeze Belly Alley’ (which measures just 18in wide at its narrowest point) is on the market for £525,000

  • Charming fishing cottage hits the market in village made famous by Doc Martin  
  • Port Isaac’s Squeeze Belly Alley is one of the world’s narrowest thoroughfares 
  • Outside the cottage, the alley measures just 18 inches at its tightest section  

Those who have overindulged this festive period may want to avoid this quaint Cornish cottage on sale in Port Isaac’s famously-narrow ‘Squeeze Belly Alley’. 

The charming two-bedroom home is located in the heart of Temple Bar, one of the world’s tightest thoroughfares, measuring just 18 inches at its narrowest point.

Known as Temple Cottage, the white-washed home is tucked away in one of the oldest parts of Port Isaac – the tiny village famously known as the setting for ITV comedy, Doc Martin, starring Martin Clunes.   

The coastal resort has become a destination for fans of the show, which is finally coming to an end after 18 years, with house prices in the picturesque village having quadrupled since Doc Martin first aired.  

The white fisherman's cottage (pictured centre) is located in the heart of Port Isaac's famously-narrow 'Squeeze Belly Alley'

The white fisherman’s cottage (pictured centre) is located in the heart of Port Isaac’s famously-narrow ‘Squeeze Belly Alley’

Pictured: views of 'Squeeze Belly Alley' from the quaint fishing cottage that's up for sale for £525,000

At it's narrowest point, the passageway - officially known as Temple Bar - is just 19 inches wide

Tight squeeze: The alley, which is officially called Temple Bar, is one of the narrowest thoroughfares in the world and measures just 18 inches wide at its narrowest point by this cottage

Temple Bar was named after the original owner of this cottage, a Mr Temple, who put a bar across the alley to stop people using it. 

It got its nickname in the 1950s when a local businessman invented a tale about a tourist getting stuck.

The first floor of the cottage extends over the alley, which links Fore Street and Dolphin Street, and it has period features such as alcoves, a fireplace, sash window and oak flooring.

The cottage has 787 sq ft of accommodation with an open plan living room and kitchen on the ground floor and two bedrooms and a bathroom upstairs. 

The village is the home of hit ITV comedy drama, Doc Martin, which stars Martin Clunes as the famously-disgruntled GP. Pictured is the two-bedroom cottage

The village is the home of hit ITV comedy drama, Doc Martin, which stars Martin Clunes as the famously-disgruntled GP. Pictured is the two-bedroom cottage 

The cottage has views of Roscarrock Hill

The cottage has views of Roscarrock Hill beyond the village’s  harbour (pictured)

Inside, the bedrooms are smartly furnished, with white walls and carpet

Inside, the bedrooms are smartly furnished, with white walls and carpet

As well as the two bedrooms, the charming fisherman's cottage also features a good-sized bathroom

As well as the two bedrooms, the charming fisherman’s cottage also features a good-sized bathroom

The bathroom has a view onto Roscarrock Hill beyond the harbour.

Outside it has a slate paved courtyard with patio table and seating, ideal for those seeking to soak in the coastal air while enjoying a coffee in the morning sunshine.

Port Isaac was a busy fishing port and an active harbour from the Middle Ages to the mid-19th century. There are still fishermen working from the harbour today. 

Penny Bolton, from Savills, said: ‘Linking Fore Street with Dolphin Street, the alley is one of many higgledy-piggledy thoroughfares that characterise Port Isaac.

Downstairs there is a cozy living room with an open fire place

Downstairs there is a cozy living room with an open fire place 

Pictured is the kitchen in the two-bedroom property, which is being marketed by Savills

Pictured is the kitchen in the two-bedroom property, which is being marketed by Savills

‘Originally named after the owner of the cottage, Mr. Temple, who put a bar across it to stop people using it, Temple Bar was nicknamed Squeeze Belly Alley in the 1950s.

‘Ted Robinson, a local businessman, invented a tale about a tourist having trouble getting through and was advised to ‘squeeze-ee-belly’. He repeated the story so many times that the name stuck.

‘From its whitewashed exterior and paned windows to its cosy beams and alcoves, Temple Cottage epitomises the traditional character and charm of the area.’

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