Queensland animal lover forced to shoot pet CROCODILES after cruel government rule change


Heartbroken animal lover is forced to shoot his two pet CROCODILES after ‘cruel’ ultimatum – only to find himself under investigation over their deaths

  • GRAPHIC CONTENT WARNING: Readers may find some images disturbing
  • A father of two shot his pet crocodiles after five years of wrangling with officials
  • Adrian Hogg spent $50,000 on his pets, only to be then told to get rid of them
  • He said officials were ‘supposed to conserve wildlife not order its destruction’
  • The Queenslander claims the department are investigating him is a cover up

A devastated animal lover shot and killed his two pet crocodiles, after a government department gave him a 20-day ultimatum to get rid of his beloved animals.

Adrian Hogg, 45, had held a permit to keep the reptiles but Queensland Department of Environment changed the law in 2020 and banned crocs from being kept as pets.

Mr Hogg told Daily Mail Australia he was shattered at having to put down his treasured pets down after investing $50,000 into their care and shelter.

Mr Hogg (pictured) said he was devastated at having to put his pets down after wrangling with the Queensland Department of Environment and Science

Mr Hogg (pictured) said he was devastated at having to put his pets down after wrangling with the Queensland Department of Environment and Science

Mr Hogg said he was also told to provide proof of their deaths to the department so the father of two said he turned up at the its Innisfail office with the crocodile carcasses as proof he had done what it asked for

Mr Hogg said he was also told to provide proof of their deaths to the department so the father of two said he turned up at the its Innisfail office with the crocodile carcasses as proof he had done what it asked for

'It was horrible, absolutely horrible ... my kids were also devastated,' are supposed to conserve wildlife not order its destruction.'

‘It was horrible, absolutely horrible … my kids were also devastated,’ Mr Hogg said about shooting his crocs. ‘The DES are supposed to conserve wildlife not order its destruction.’

‘It was horrible, absolutely horrible … my kids were also devastated,’ Mr Hogg said. 

The North Queenslander said the department had repeatedly requested to monitor and mitigate the animals’ threat to the public. 

‘They have been harassing me for the past five years since I legally kept them,’ he said. ‘

I followed every single law including building a pen at great expense, with a condition on the permit that I had to meet those standards.’

But earlier this month, Mr Hogg was issued with a notice to re-home the crocs or have them euthanised humanely by a veterinary surgeon.

He said both options were problematic and his efforts to re-home them proved futile as zoos are full to capacity with crocodiles.

He said he didn’t want to put them in a farm for fear they might get killed for their skin.

He was also told to provide proof of their deaths to the department. 

The father of two said he turned up at the its Innisfail office with the crocodile carcasses as proof he had done what it asked for.

Mr Hogg is now said to be under investigation by the department for the manner in which his crocs were killed, according to the Courier Mail

The North Queenslander spent $30,000 after being told by the DES to secure the crocs, by building an enclosure complete with fish-filled lagoon

The North Queenslander spent $30,000 after being told by the DES to secure the crocs, by building an enclosure complete with fish-filled lagoon

Mr Hogg is under investigation by the DES for the manner in which his crocs were killed the Courier Mail reported on Saturday

Mr Hogg is under investigation by the DES for the manner in which his crocs were killed the Courier Mail reported on Saturday

But Mr Hogg told Daily Mail Australia he has received no notification of this and says the officials are acting out of spite.

‘They are just trying to turn it, that I’m the evil one,’ he said.

‘[They don’t] like media exposure of their requirements for euthanasia of healthy captive protected native animals. 

‘They are supposed to conserve wildlife, not order its destruction.’ 

Mr Hogg said he bought his prized pets for $700 in the Northern Territory and had invested $30,000 in an ‘escape proof’ enclosure for them at his home, which included a lagoon full of fish. 

The department told the Courier Mail it was illegal to keep crocodiles as pets under current legislation because they were dangerous reptiles and a public safety risk when kept in captivity.

A spokeswoman said it did not tell Mr Hogg to shoot the crocodiles but to have them euthanised humanely.

It said the matter was now under investigation. 

Daily Mail Australia has contacted Queensland Department of Environment and Science for comment. 

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