Rich people need to admit when their parents help them buy a house

Working class woman, 29, who’s struggling to save a deposit says nothing annoys her more than ‘rich friends who don’t admit their parents helped them buy a house’

  • Dayna McAlpine, 29, wants people to admit how they bought their home
  • When friends keep schtum, Dayna feels like she’s not saving hard enough 
  • She doesn’t care if you get help from the bank of Mum and Dad, but be honest
  • Visit Metro.co.uk to read the full version of this article 

Arriving at a friend’s house-warming party at his new spacious Edinburgh flat, Dayna McAlpine was stumped. How could a single person in their late twenties afford such a property?

Having saved and scrimped for years, she ended up going home with the belief that it wasn’t them that she should be questioning, but her own irresponsible ways with money.

However, a few days later and desperate to know the secret to their saving success, she decided to ask the owner outright how he could afford it.

’One night, after a few bottles of wine, I questioned how long it had taken him to save up for his flat deposit,’ Dayna, 29, told Metro.co.uk.

‘I wanted to know how the hell was I not making the same progress they were? Awkwardness broke out around the table and no one would meet my eye – I’ve always been frank about money, as growing up with a lack of it tends to make you care less about the taboo of talking about it, but the host looked deeply uncomfortable.’

Danya McAlpine was confused when she visited a friend's flat in Edinburgh and wondered how they could afford such a nice property in their late twenties

Danya McAlpine was confused when she visited a friend’s flat in Edinburgh and wondered how they could afford such a nice property in their late twenties 

It was then that her friend admitted his parents had put down a lump sum, before defending his position and explaining that he still paid his mortgage and that ‘was really tough’.

I really don’t care whether your parents paid your £40k flat deposit and got you onto the property ladder – but please don’t pretend that you struggled to get there 

While Dayna admits it was a relief to know it wasn’t her fault that she couldn’t afford property, it cemented her belief that those who get a helping hand should be more honest about it – especially with friends from working class backgrounds.

‘I really don’t care whether your parents paid your £40k flat deposit and got you onto the property ladder – but please don’t pretend that you struggled to get there,’ said Dayna.

‘Rich friends need to start being honest about where their money comes from. Having rich parents to fall back on doesn’t just give someone the ability to buy their first home, it allows them to take risks that their working class friends can’t afford. 

‘You wouldn’t tell someone who’d climbed Kilimanjaro that you’d had the same experience because you’d walked up Hampstead Heath.’

In fact, Dayna says that being honest about getting help from the bank of mum and dad is actually something she finds refreshing, rather than off-putting.

‘There’s no deceit, no pretending that they know how it feels to come from a working class background.

‘It’s not that they’ve worked harder than me, she says. ‘They haven’t cracked the code of how to juggle all the demands of life and build a career and somehow afford a property.’

‘Admitting you’ve had help doesn’t mean you’re suddenly going to be struck by working-class lightning and we’re all going to call you a spoiled brat,’ she added. ‘Some people get an advantage in life, and I think the least you can do is be honest about yours.’

Visit Metro.co.uk to read the full version of this article 

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