Sam Smith discusses finally learning to love their figure after years of insecurity

‘I have the opposite of body dysmorphia!’: Sam Smith discusses finally learning to love their figure after years of insecurity

Sam Smith has revealed they have the ‘opposite of body dysmorphia’ after finally learning to love their figure.

The singer,  30 – who is non-binary and uses gender neutral pronouns – said how they struggled with weight issues as a child and feared judgment after entering the music industry.  

Speaking to The Sunday Times Sam revealed a gruelling 2018 tour forced them to reevaluate their thoughts and is now ‘happier than ever’ in their own skin.  

Loving life: Sam Smith has revealed they have the ‘opposite of body dysmorphia’ after finally learning to love their figure

Sam went on to say that fears stemmed from their childhood when they would be self conscious on family holidays. 

‘[Following the 2018 tour] Every time I went to the pool I felt self-conscious, but I forced myself to take my top off’. 

‘It paid off because I now have the opposite of body dysmorphia. I look fabulous. I’m finally getting a tan. I’m burnt in places I’ve never been burnt.’

Honest: Speaking to The Sunday Times Sam revealed a gruelling 2018 tour forced them to reevaluate and is now 'happier than ever' in their own skin

Throwback: Pictured in 2018

Honest: Speaking to The Sunday Times Sam revealed a gruelling 2018 tour forced them to reevaluate and is now ‘happier than ever’ in their own skin (right, pictured in 2018) 

Gorgeous: 'I now have the opposite of body dysmorphia. I look fabulous. I'm finally getting a tan. I'm burnt in places I've never been burnt'

Gorgeous: ‘I now have the opposite of body dysmorphia. I look fabulous. I’m finally getting a tan. I’m burnt in places I’ve never been burnt’

Adding: ‘My mum says that, as I’ve got older, I’ve stopped caring what people think as much. She tends to be right.’ 

According to The NHS Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), or body dysmorphia, ‘is a mental health condition where a person spends a lot of time worrying about flaws in their appearance. These flaws are often unnoticeable to others’. 

It comes after the hitmaker was mocked for discussing the craziest rumour that they ever heard about themselves – which is that they are secretly the singer Adele, but in drag. 

Loud and proud: Adding: 'My mum says that, as I've got older, I've stopped caring what people think as much. She tends to be right'

Loud and proud: Adding: ‘My mum says that, as I’ve got older, I’ve stopped caring what people think as much. She tends to be right’

The star told Drew Barrymore on Monday that the conspiracy theory emerged because they and Adele, 34, have never been seen in the same room.

And moreover Sam said that if you slow Adele’s voice down, it does actually sound like theirs.

Sam said: ‘Everyone thinks I’m Adele. We’ve never been seen in the same room together. If you slow down her voice, it sounds a bit like mine.’

But fans went wild and tweeted: ‘Nobody ever, in their wildest fever dream, while drunk and high on opioids has EVER said Sam Smith is Adele in drag. 

Zany: It comes after the hitmaker was mocked for discussing the craziest rumour that they ever heard about themselves - which is that they are secretly the singer Adele , but in drag

Zany: It comes after the hitmaker was mocked for discussing the craziest rumour that they ever heard about themselves – which is that they are secretly the singer Adele , but in drag

‘The VOICE? For sure pitched sounds like it. But physically? Even a blind man wouldn’t make that mistake.’ 

‘I want Adele’s reaction to what Sam Smith said.’

‘One thing is “hey, they sound similar!” and another one is “Adele is Sam Smith in drag!”. Not quite the same’.

WHAT IS BODY DYSMORPHIC DISORDER?

Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), or body dysmorphia, is a mental health condition where a person spends a lot of time worrying about flaws in their appearance. These flaws are often unnoticeable to others.

People of any age can have BDD, but it is most common in teenagers and young adults. It affects both men and women.

Having BDD does not mean you are vain or self-obsessed. It can be very upsetting and have a big impact on your life.

Symptoms of BDD

You might have BDD if you:

  • worry a lot about a specific area of your body (particularly your face)
  • spend a lot of time comparing your looks with other people’s
  • look at yourself in mirrors a lot or avoid mirrors altogether
  • go to a lot of effort to conceal flaws – for example, by spending a long time combing your hair, applying make-up or choosing clothes
  • pick at your skin to make it ‘smooth’

BDD can seriously affect your daily life, including your work, social life and relationships. BDD can also lead to depression, self-harm and even thoughts of suicide. 

You should visit your GP if you think you might have BDD. 

If you have relatively mild symptoms of BDD you should be referred for a type of talking therapy called cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), which you have either on your own or in a group

If you have moderate symptoms of BDD you should be offered either CBT or a type of antidepressant medication called a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)

If you have more severe symptoms of BDD, or other treatments don’t work, you should be offered CBT together with an SSRI.

Source: NHS

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