Sami Lukis shares the cruel letters she received from Channel 9 viewers during her stint on TV


Read the cruel handwritten notes and letters weather woman Sami Lukis received from strangers during her stint on TV: ‘I wasn’t prepared for it’

  • Sami Lukis was a weather presenter on Channel 9’s Today show in early 2000s
  • The now 52-year-old from Sydney copped criticism viewers who sent her letters
  • Ms Lukis has now shared some of the archived notes she received 
  • Viewers commented on her appearance, performance, laugh and outfits  

Former weather presenter Sami Lukis has dived into the archives of cruel letters she received from viewers while working on Channel 9’s Today show in the early 2000s. 

The now 52-year-old from Sydney copped criticism about her appearance, performance, laugh and even what colour lipstick she wore. 

Unlike today’s digital age, viewers needed to go out of their way to make themselves heard by writing or typing letters to send to the television station. 

Australian media personality Sami Lukis (pictured) has shared images of the cruel letters she received from viewers in the early 2000s while working as a weather presenter on Channel 9's Today show

Australian media personality Sami Lukis (pictured) has shared images of the cruel letters she received from viewers in the early 2000s while working as a weather presenter on Channel 9’s Today show 

Ms Lukis copped criticism about her appearance, performance, laugh and even what colour lipstick she wore

Ms Lukis copped criticism about her appearance, performance, laugh and even what colour lipstick she wore

Ms Lukis (pictured, centre in blue) was the first full-time female weather presenter on the Today show and replaced Monte Dwyer

Ms Lukis (pictured, centre in blue) was the first full-time female weather presenter on the Today show and replaced Monte Dwyer

Ms Lukis said she was the first full-time female weather presenter on the Today show and replaced Monte Dwyer.

‘I knew I would be a big change for viewers, but I wasn’t prepared for the onslaught of criticism I received about my… well… everything!’ she told 9Honey. 

‘I realised very quickly that it didn’t matter how hard I worked, or how much time I spent studying the weather patterns, or how much effort I put into preparing each and every weather cross, because a woman’s appearance is always going to be judged more than her ability.

‘But sadly, the majority of complaints from viewers were about my appearance. They were rude, condescending and often, downright cruel. I guess they were the OG trolls.’

One handwritten letter from Michelle in Brighton read: 'Please update your old-fashioned hairstyle. It hasn't any shape at all'

One handwritten letter from Michelle in Brighton read: ‘Please update your old-fashioned hairstyle. It hasn’t any shape at all’  

A man who described himself as 'a very old TV watcher from Bundaberg' sent a letter to Ms Lukis that read: 'I like you… but to be honest, to see you dress like a very cheap person, you disgust me. Please don't present yourself so cheap in future'

A man who described himself as ‘a very old TV watcher from Bundaberg’ sent a letter to Ms Lukis that read: ‘I like you… but to be honest, to see you dress like a very cheap person, you disgust me. Please don’t present yourself so cheap in future’ 

One handwritten letter from Michelle in Brighton read: ‘Please update your old-fashioned hairstyle. It hasn’t any shape at all. 

‘Surely Sydney has one decent modern hairdresser. A Melbourne girl wouldn’t be seen in public with long, straggly hair. Sydney girls have the ‘tarty’ look. Why?’ 

A man who described himself as ‘a very old TV watcher from Bundaberg’ sent a letter to Ms Lukis that read: ‘I like you… but to be honest, to see you dress like a very cheap person, you disgust me. Please don’t present yourself so cheap in future. It don’t suit you.’

A typed complaint from two women in Bendigo read: 'We realise you have to get up early, but is there any need to come into work in your nightclub tops.'

A typed complaint from two women in Bendigo read: ‘We realise you have to get up early, but is there any need to come into work in your nightclub tops.’ 

A typed complaint from two women in Bendigo read: ‘We realise you have to get up early, but is there any need to come into work in your nightclub tops.

‘You are on show, but that is not a licence to bare all. Your male colleagues are all in a collar and tie.’

Another handwritten letter from an anonymous group of men asked why Ms Lukis wears so much makeup on television. 

‘Why do you over make up your otherwise pretty face? With your over-rosy cheeks and your coal-miners black eyes you do not look pretty anymore, rather, ugly,’ the letter read. 

‘It really is a shame such a nice face can look so awful. We are a bunch of young men who otherwise like you.’

A handwritten letter from an anonymous group of men asked why Ms Lukis wears so much makeup

A handwritten letter from an anonymous group of men asked why Ms Lukis wears so much makeup 

An anonymous note written in capital letters urged Ms Lukis to stop 'giggling and gabbling like an idiot' because she sounds 'like a chihuahua dog'

An anonymous note written in capital letters urged Ms Lukis to stop ‘giggling and gabbling like an idiot’ because she sounds ‘like a chihuahua dog’ 

An anonymous note written in capital letters urged Ms Lukis to stop ‘giggling and gabbling like an idiot’ because she sounds ‘like a chihuahua dog’. 

‘You don’t make any sense, you prattle to (sic) fast. Go to a speech therapist an (sic) learn to speak correctly or shut up completely,’ the note read. 

Perhaps the most brutal criticism of all was a full-page typed letter criticised Ms Lukis’ presentation and protest the cuff length of her sleeves. 

‘In your choice of clothing you are prone to error too often. One recent example, black with white trimming and white cuffs, the cuff length being about 8cm, making them the dominant feature of the picture,’ the letter read. 

‘A better balance would be about 2-3cm. This sort of excessive adornment conveys the impression of untidiness and disorganisation.’

And a number back handed compliments start with sentences including ‘you show good taste choosing your wardrobe’ only to criticise another aspect of the overall look. 

Perhaps the most brutal criticism of all was a full-page typed letter criticised Ms Lukis' presentation and protest the cuff length of her sleeves

Perhaps the most brutal criticism of all was a full-page typed letter criticised Ms Lukis’ presentation and protest the cuff length of her sleeves 

Looking back Ms Lukis still believes a weather presenter is ‘the best job on Aussie TV’ due to the fun nature of the job and travel opportunities it provides. 

If she could say one thing to the viewers who sent the letters, Ms Lukis would say ‘thanks for watching’. 

‘My response might be 20 years late… but better late than never,’ she said.

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