Sarah Beeny celebrates her 51st birthday with breakfast in bed after finishing chemotherapy

Sarah Beeny is treated to a sweet breakfast in bed from her husband to mark her 51st birthday – days after finishing chemotherapy amid breast cancer battle

  • The Macmillan Support Line is a free and confidential phone service for people living and affected by cancer. Call 0808 808 00 00 for support 

Sarah Beeny was treated to breakfast in bed by her husband on Monday as he marked her 51st birthday.

The presenter and TV property expert shared a snap to Instagram of her porridge with blueberries arranged in a smiley face as a sweet treat from her partner Graham Swift.

The celebratory breakfast comes just days after Sarah – who revealed in August she had cancer – had her last chemotherapy session. 

Celebrations: Sarah Beeny was treated to breakfast in bed by her husband on Monday as he marked her 51st birthday

Celebrations: Sarah Beeny was treated to breakfast in bed by her husband on Monday as he marked her 51st birthday

Captioning the post of her breakfast, Sarah wrote: ‘Birthday brekkie in bed!!!! Graham bring particularly lovely today!! Xxx.’

The post was met with several messages from her fans and showbiz pals wishing her a happy birthday.

Sarah’s birthday joy continued from her elation on Friday as she revealed that she had ‘no more chemo’ left to do.

Something to smile about: The presenter and TV property expert shared a snap to Instagram of her porridge with blueberries arranged in a smiley face as a sweet treat from her partner Graham Swift

Something to smile about: The presenter and TV property expert shared a snap to Instagram of her porridge with blueberries arranged in a smiley face as a sweet treat from her partner Graham Swift

How lovely: Captioning the post of her breakfast, Sarah wrote: 'Birthday brekkie in bed!!!! Graham bring particularly lovely today!! Xxx'

How lovely: Captioning the post of her breakfast, Sarah wrote: ‘Birthday brekkie in bed!!!! Graham bring particularly lovely today!! Xxx’

Alongside a picture of her sons’ CD cover, Sarah wrote ‘Not sure what is making the sun shine the most – 2 days into steroids (happy pills!!!) – no more chemo or @the_entitled_sons releasing their best song yet… 

‘YES Friday IS a good day xx #finishedchemo #HEAVENKNOWS @nickyjohnston (sic)’.

It comes after Sarah revealed her last chemotherapy session was cancelled because her liver numbers were too high and her white blood cell count was too low.

Great news: Sarah's birthday joy continued from her elation on Friday as she revealed that she had 'no more chemo' left to do

Great news: Sarah’s birthday joy continued from her elation on Friday as she revealed that she had ‘no more chemo’ left to do

She sent Happy New Year wishes to her followers as she revealed she was forced to miss out on partying this year.

Sarah told how she has been ‘laying around like a Dowager Duchess’ since the cancellation but assured fans she has started to feel bit brighter.

The Property Ladder presenter shared a photograph of a mug of coffee and some biscuits which had been delivered to her by her son Billy, 18.

Update: It comes after Sarah revealed her last chemotherapy session was cancelled because her liver numbers were too high and her white blood cell count was too low

Update: It comes after Sarah revealed her last chemotherapy session was cancelled because her liver numbers were too high and her white blood cell count was too low

Alongside the snap, she wrote: ‘Been delivered the perfect tray this morning by the brilliant Billy Swift!! Happy slightly late New Year to everyone…

‘Been laying around like a Dowager Duchess a bit since last Chemo on 30th was cancelled because liver numbers too high and white blood cells too low… 

‘Just as you think you’re there….. bit less Eeyore now and hoping bloods better this week…. Hope you all were partying for me!!! Thank you all for your lovely messages!’

Sarah has been sharing updates over the festive period and last week she took to Instagram to post a snap of herself planting flowers in empty loo rolls with one of her her sons, Charlie, 16.

Sweet: The Property Ladder presenter shared a photograph of a mug of coffee and some biscuits which had been delivered to her by her son Billy, 18

Sweet: The Property Ladder presenter shared a photograph of a mug of coffee and some biscuits which had been delivered to her by her son Billy, 18

In the sweet image, she beamed from ear-to-ear while wearing a pink knitted hat and an orange polo neck sweater as she posed with her child.

In her caption, she wrote: ‘@_charlie_swift_ it’s just not that wierd [sic] a thing to do with empty loo rolls….. just you wait till all the flowers pop out…..!!! X

‘Thanks to the wonderful @somersetwreathsandgarlands for the idea and lovely seeds – you’re simply the best!!! And @alpacamyhat for the lovely warm hat!! X’

Busy bees: In her caption, she wrote: '@_charlie_swift_ it¿s just not that wierd [sic] a thing to do with empty loo rolls¿.. just you wait till all the flowers pop out¿..!!! X'

Busy bees: In her caption, she wrote: ‘@_charlie_swift_ it’s just not that wierd [sic] a thing to do with empty loo rolls….. just you wait till all the flowers pop out…..!!! X’

It comes after Sarah was praised by her fans as she visited the Institute of Cancer Research to learn about genetics amid her own battle with the disease.

The broadcaster took to Instagram to share a photograph of herself with Professor Clare Turnbull as she visited the cancer research organisation.

She sported a white ICR lab coat as she posed alongside the NHS consultant in clinical cancer genetics as she spent the morning at the institute.

'Inspiring': It comes after Sarah was praised by her fans as she visited the Institute of Cancer Research to learn about genetics amid her own battle with the disease

‘Inspiring’: It comes after Sarah was praised by her fans as she visited the Institute of Cancer Research to learn about genetics amid her own battle with the disease

Sarah, who was diagnosed with breast cancer in July, was praised by her 248,000 followers as ‘amazing’ and an ‘inspiration’ for raising awareness for cancer research.

Taking to the comments section, one person wrote: ‘Love the way you are researching the heck out of this insidious disease xx.’

While another added: ‘Looking fabulous Sarah and great to be talking to breast cancer/genetics professor Clare Turnbull.’

A third said: ‘They do great work!’, to which Sarah replied with: ‘So interesting!!! Genetics research is mind blowing!!’

Family: Sarah is also mother to sons Charlie, 16, and Billy, 18, with her husband of 19 years Graham Swift

Family: Sarah is also mother to sons Charlie, 16, and Billy, 18, with her husband of 19 years Graham Swift 

A fourth commented: ‘Sarah you are a pioneer too and an amazing lady,’ and another added: ‘Hang on in there Sarah, a great inspiration to so many. Keep on going.’

The Institute of Cancer Research in London is one of the world’s most influential cancer research organisations and looks into cancer genetics, cancer biology and personalised medicine.

Alongside her post, Sarah wrote of her visit: ‘Absolutely fascinating to talk #genetics with the brilliant Professor Clare Turnbull this morning – thank you so much @icr_london loved wearing a lab coat! Xx #cancerresearch #breastcancerawareness #breastcancer.’

The Macmillan Support Line offers free, confidential support to people living with cancer and their loved ones. Call 0808 808 00 00 for support.

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world and affects more than two MILLION women a year

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Each year in the UK there are more than 55,000 new cases, and the disease claims the lives of 11,500 women. In the US, it strikes 266,000 each year and kills 40,000. But what causes it and how can it be treated?

What is breast cancer?

Breast cancer develops from a cancerous cell which develops in the lining of a duct or lobule in one of the breasts.

When the breast cancer has spread into surrounding breast tissue it is called an ‘invasive’ breast cancer. Some people are diagnosed with ‘carcinoma in situ’, where no cancer cells have grown beyond the duct or lobule.

Most cases develop in women over the age of 50 but younger women are sometimes affected. Breast cancer can develop in men though this is rare.

Staging means how big the cancer is and whether it has spread. Stage 1 is the earliest stage and stage 4 means the cancer has spread to another part of the body.

The cancerous cells are graded from low, which means a slow growth, to high, which is fast growing. High grade cancers are more likely to come back after they have first been treated.

What causes breast cancer?

A cancerous tumour starts from one abnormal cell. The exact reason why a cell becomes cancerous is unclear. It is thought that something damages or alters certain genes in the cell. This makes the cell abnormal and multiply ‘out of control’.

Although breast cancer can develop for no apparent reason, there are some risk factors that can increase the chance of developing breast cancer, such as genetics.

What are the symptoms of breast cancer?

The usual first symptom is a painless lump in the breast, although most breast lumps are not cancerous and are fluid filled cysts, which are benign. 

The first place that breast cancer usually spreads to is the lymph nodes in the armpit. If this occurs you will develop a swelling or lump in an armpit.

How is breast cancer diagnosed?

  • Initial assessment: A doctor examines the breasts and armpits. They may do tests such as a mammography, a special x-ray of the breast tissue which can indicate the possibility of tumours.
  • Biopsy: A biopsy is when a small sample of tissue is removed from a part of the body. The sample is then examined under the microscope to look for abnormal cells. The sample can confirm or rule out cancer.

If you are confirmed to have breast cancer, further tests may be needed to assess if it has spread. For example, blood tests, an ultrasound scan of the liver or a chest x-ray.

How is breast cancer treated?

Treatment options which may be considered include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormone treatment. Often a combination of two or more of these treatments are used.

  • Surgery: Breast-conserving surgery or the removal of the affected breast depending on the size of the tumour.
  • Radiotherapy: A treatment which uses high energy beams of radiation focussed on cancerous tissue. This kills cancer cells, or stops cancer cells from multiplying. It is mainly used in addition to surgery.
  • Chemotherapy: A treatment of cancer by using anti-cancer drugs which kill cancer cells, or stop them from multiplying
  • Hormone treatments: Some types of breast cancer are affected by the ‘female’ hormone oestrogen, which can stimulate the cancer cells to divide and multiply. Treatments which reduce the level of these hormones, or prevent them from working, are commonly used in people with breast cancer.

How successful is treatment?

The outlook is best in those who are diagnosed when the cancer is still small, and has not spread. Surgical removal of a tumour in an early stage may then give a good chance of cure.

The routine mammography offered to women between the ages of 50 and 70 mean more breast cancers are being diagnosed and treated at an early stage.

For more information visit breastcancernow.org or call its free helpline on 0808 800 6000

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