Snakes alive! Brave possum finds a VERY unwanted visitor inside his Brisbane home

A curious possum was shocked to discover a very unwelcome visitor had slithered into his man-made home one night.

Brisbane resident Bicky Apples recently uploaded a remarkable nature video to the Australian Native Animals Facebook page after reviewing some overnight footage from her deck.

In the clip, a brave marsupial can be seen peering into a possum box, where his ‘house’ has been taken over by a carpet python.

Wisely the possum decides to move on instead of pestering the snake and runs away to sleep elsewhere.

A possum (pictured) was shocked to discover he had an unwanted house guest - a carpet python

A possum (pictured) was shocked to discover he had an unwanted house guest – a carpet python

Eventually the marsupial chose to move away, with the python (pictured left) comfortably nestled inside the possum box

Eventually the marsupial chose to move away, with the python (pictured left) comfortably nestled inside the possum box

Ms Apples expressed her surprise that the possum ‘was not as afraid of snakes as I’d like it to be’.

A local snake catcher from Brisbane North confirmed the python was later safely removed and placed back in the wild.

‘This beautiful coastal carpet python – which is non venomous – was relocated this morning by myself,’ Steve Brown said in a Facebook comment.

‘He was such a gentle snake, and is now in a beautiful new habitat away from homes and roads. 

‘As I’m a wildlife carer for reptiles, I was happy enough to help Bicky out.’

Debate raged on social media as to whether the python should have been left alone.

‘The snake needs to find his own place instead of possum’s little box… poor little possum, he seems pretty smart though,’ one commented.

Another felt the python ‘could do whatever they wanted to’, while a third shocked many after stating ‘quite often they co-inhabit. The snake stays there for warmth and the possum gets protection’.

COASTAL CARPET PYTHON:

  • Coastal carpet pythons are one of the largest snakes to inhabit Australia’s east coast
  • They grow up to 3m (10 feet) in length
  • They have up to 80 needle-like teeth that point backwards and can break off in a victim
  • They are not poisonous and not aggressive unless they get frightened or disturbed
  • They are often found in the roofs of houses
  • If you spot a python in your home, don’t disturb it, call your local snake catcher who will remove it

Sources: Queensland Museum, Snake Catcher Brisbane

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