Snow-covered bison walks through September storm as cold snap sweeps Rocky Mountains

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Winter has arrived early in the Midwest, with September snowstorms causing temperatures to plunge by more than 60 degrees in some regions. 

Up to 17 feet of snow fell in mountainous areas of Wyoming on Labor Day – which marks the unofficial end of summer. 

Snow also fell in nearby Yellowstone National Park, with a bison seen battling against sleet and icy winds in one video shared on social media. 

‘Labor Day in Yellowstone. Surely this bison is a metaphor for something in 2020,’ Twitter user Chris Frink wrote beneath the short clip. 

Winter has arrived early in the Midwest, with a September snowstorm causing temperatures to plunge by more than 60 degrees in some regions.  Pictured: A bison in Evergreen, Colorado on Tuesday

Winter has arrived early in the Midwest, with a September snowstorm causing temperatures to plunge by more than 60 degrees in some regions.  Pictured: A bison in Evergreen, Colorado on Tuesday

The snow forced the closure of Yellowstone’s east entrance on Monday, which still remains blocked off to the public. 

The Montana town of Red Lodge, which lays close to Yellowstone recorded 10.5 inches of snow. 

Meanwhile, bison were also seen shivering in Evergreen, Colorado on Tuesday, as snow fell for a second consecutive day. 

In nearby Fort Collins, Colorado, residents spent the morning of Labor Day monitoring the nearby Cameron Peak Wildfire. 

The fire had razed 100,000 acres of land, with smoke turning the sky bright orange, 

Temperatures climbed into the 90s, following near record-breaking heat over the weekend. 

But by Tuesday, the area was doused in snow, with temperatures plunging into the 30s. 

The icy temperatures have helped fatigued firefighters catch a much-needed break in their efforts to contain the blaze.  

On Monday, many  Colorado residents spent the morning monitoring the Cameron Peak Wildfire (pictured). But in less than 24 hours, the smoke had been replaced by snowfall

On Monday, many  Colorado residents spent the morning monitoring the Cameron Peak Wildfire (pictured). But in less than 24 hours, the smoke had been replaced by snowfall 

Members of the Colorado National Guard are seen standing in snow on Tuesday, at a roadblock which had been set up for the Cameron Peak wildfire outside of Fort Collins

Members of the Colorado National Guard are seen standing in snow on Tuesday, at a roadblock which had been set up for the Cameron Peak wildfire outside of Fort Collins 

There were similar stories in the Colorado cities of Denver and Boulder, with locals battling record-high temperature of 101 degrees on Saturday. 

By Tuesday, they were were shoveling snow and scraping ice from the windshields of their cars. 

The weather still remains icy in both cities. Denver is expected to hit highs of just 45 forecast for Wednesday, while Boulder will reach just 40. 

However, the cold weather is only temporary, with temperatures expected to climb back into the 70s by the end of the week. 

Smoke from the Cameron Peak wildfire is seen over Denver on Sunday morning. Snow would be falling in the city less than 24 hours later

Smoke from the Cameron Peak wildfire is seen over Denver on Sunday morning. Snow would be falling in the city less than 24 hours later 

An electrician is seen performing repair work to a power line on Wednesday following a snowstorm in Denver

An electrician is seen performing repair work to a power line on Wednesday following a snowstorm in Denver 

Cars are seen driving on a snowy highway outside of Denver on Tuesday

Cars are seen driving on a snowy highway outside of Denver on Tuesday 

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