Some 51% of adults say America is becoming a ‘big government socialist state’

You need how much, comrade Biden? Some 51% of adults say America is becoming a ‘big government socialist state,’ as climate spending pushes debt above $31 trillion

  • Americans by a 20 percentage point margin see socialism on America’s horizon 
  • They’re not necessarily thrilled by the idea: most object to more social spending 
  • Likewise, there is limited support for state-run healthcare and energy sectors
  • Survey comes after years of elevated government spending 
  • Republican tax cuts and Democrat spending hikes have blown up the deficit
  • US reached its borrowing limit of $31.38 trillion on Thursday 

After years of elevated spending on COVID, defense, infrastructure and climate change schemes, Americans by a wide margin say the nation is becoming a ‘big government socialist state,’ polling shows.

A TIPP Poll on Thursday found that, by 51 percent to 31 percent, Americans said the US was becoming an ultra-left economy — the remaining fifth of those surveyed said they were not sure.

‘Today, a majority of Americans agree that the sudden, rapid growth from COVID-related spending and burgeoning top-down control over the domestic economy to address climate change have put the US on a path toward socialism,’ the group said in a statement.

The results come as the US hit its borrowing limit of $31.38 trillion, after years of borrowing-fuelled government spending via Republican tax cuts and big Democratic infrastructure projects.

Pollsters found that, by 51 percent to 31 percent, Americans said the US was becoming an ultra-left economy ¿ the remaining fifth of those surveyed said they were not sure

Pollsters found that, by 51 percent to 31 percent, Americans said the US was becoming an ultra-left economy — the remaining fifth of those surveyed said they were not sure

President Joe Biden last month inked a $1.7 trillion federal spending bill, with defense and social spending, after in 2021 signing his more than $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill, focussed on transportation, utilities and climate change schemes.

It’s not only Democrats who have raised borrowing. Former president Donald Trump’s tax cuts of 2017 were not accompanied by significant spending reductions, upping the deficit by nearly $7.8 trillion during his time in the White House.

Interestingly, supporters of both main parties among TIPP’s 1,356 respondents broadly agreed that America was evolving into a big government leftist economy, where the state plays an outsize role in people’s lives.

Republicans by a 68-18 percent majority said the US was on a Marxist trajectory, but even a plurality of Democrats said the same thing, with 42 percent agreeing with the claim against 40 percent who disagreed.

While they saw a national leftist drift, respondents did not seem thrilled about it, according to TIPP, which gets an A+ rating from the polling website FiveThirtyEight.

When asked whether they’d gladly finance more social programs, about a third of respondents said they’d stomach higher taxes, while 57 percent objected. Republicans were more staunchly opposed than Democrats.

When asked whether they'd gladly finance more social programs, about a third or respondents said they'd put up with higher taxes, while 57 percent objected.

When asked whether they’d gladly finance more social programs, about a third or respondents said they’d put up with higher taxes, while 57 percent objected.

Workers at a wind farm under construction in Encino, New Mexico. Biden in 2021 signed his more than $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill, focussed on transportation, utilities and climate change schemes

Workers at a wind farm under construction in Encino, New Mexico. Biden in 2021 signed his more than $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill, focussed on transportation, utilities and climate change schemes

President Joe Biden last month inked a $1.7 trillion federal spending bill

President Joe Biden last month inked a $1.7 trillion federal spending bill

Likewise, when asked whether they wanted socialist-style state control over healthcare and the energy sector, 46 percent objected while 39 percent approved. Again, Republicans were more vehement naysayers.

‘While Democrats are less likely to see the US evolving into a socialist state, they support higher taxes for social programs and the takeover of major parts of the economy, both hallmarks of socialist economics,’ researchers concluded.

‘This is likely to form the basis of future bitter policy disputes between the White House and the major parties in Congress.’

Meanwhile, the US government hit its $31.4 trillion borrowing limit on Thursday, amid a standoff between the Republican-controlled House of Representatives and Democrats that could lead to a fiscal crisis in a few months.

Republicans, with a newly won House majority, aim to use the congressionally mandated federal debt ceiling to exact spending cuts from Biden and the Democratic-led Senate.

When asked whether they wanted socialist-style state control over healthcare and the energy sector, 46 percent of respondents objected while 39 percent approved

When asked whether they wanted socialist-style state control over healthcare and the energy sector, 46 percent of respondents objected while 39 percent approved

A view of the run-down Antimano neighbourhood in Caracas, Venezuela, where a bungling and heavy-handed leftist government has left some four fifths of the population living in poverty

A view of the run-down Antimano neighbourhood in Caracas, Venezuela, where a bungling and heavy-handed leftist government has left some four fifths of the population living in poverty

Thursday’s deadline will have little immediate effect, because Treasury officials are prepared to begin employing emergency cash management measures to stave off default.

More serious risks will emerge closer to June, when the government approaches the so-called X date, beyond which the Treasury would run out of emergency maneuvers.

Ahead of that deadline, there was no sign that either side was willing to bend.

‘It is something that should be done without conditions. We should not be negotiating around it. It is the basic duty of Congress to get that done,’ White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre told reporters.

Republicans are instead pursuing a ‘debt prioritization’ plan that would seek to avert default by urging the Treasury to prioritize debt payments, and possibly other priorities such as Social Security and Medicare, should the limit be breached during negotiations. Republicans hope to complete the legislation by the end of March.

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