Sophie Kim reveals the things she finds unusual about Australia, including ‘cute’ terminology

American expat reveals the things she finds strange about living in Australia – and the common words we pronounce differently

  • An American living in Sydney revealed the things she finds strange Down Under
  • She shared the unusual Aussie terms she’s not used to but thinks are ‘cute’
  • The terms that surprise her include ‘leave it with me’, and ‘kiwi fruit’ not ‘kiwi’
  • The expat has shared several culture shocks she’s experienced since the move 

A Californian bikini designer living in Sydney has revealed the unusual culture shocks she’s experienced since moving Down Under.

In a recent TikTok video Sophia Kim spoke about the ‘cute’ Aussie terms that aren’t common in the US, including ‘leave it with me’ and ‘kiwi fruit.’ 

The 30-year-old expat, who moved to Australia in February 2020, previously shared the differences in pronunciation and slang between America and Australia.

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30-year-old Californian woman Sophia Kim (pictured) has revealed the random differences she's noticed between American and Australia since she moved to Sydney in 2020

30-year-old Californian woman Sophia Kim (pictured) has revealed the random differences she’s noticed between American and Australia since she moved to Sydney in 2020

The woman uploaded a video listing the 'cute' Australian terms she's not used to, including 'leave it with me' and 'kiwi fruit'

The woman uploaded a video listing the ‘cute’ Australian terms she’s not used to, including ‘leave it with me’ and ‘kiwi fruit’

‘Here’s some random things that Australians love to say,’ the founder of swimwear label Siempre Golden said.

They love to say “Leave it with me” and it gives me some assurance when you say that,’ she said.

‘You guys always say “kiwi fruit” instead of just “kiwi,” it’s like saying “strawberry fruit,” “cherry fruit,” “banana fruit.”

Ms Kim's followers explained that Australian people refer to kiwis as 'Kiwi fruit' to prevent confusion with the popular nickname for New Zealanders

Ms Kim’s followers explained that Australian people refer to kiwis as ‘Kiwi fruit’ to prevent confusion with the popular nickname for New Zealanders

‘If I asked for a kiwi, I would expect the person not the fruit even if standing next to fruit bowl,’ one person commented, explaining that the term kiwi is often used to refer to people from New Zealand.

‘Kiwi also associated with New Zealanders so that’s why they add fruit at the back,’ another agreed.

‘We say leave it with me to gives us time to figure out what the f to do as we don’t have a plan,’ another laughed. 

Previously the young woman shared the words that Americans and Australians pronounce differently.

She has noticed a difference in pronunciation in words such as dachshund, reschedule and diary.

‘You guys say “dash hound” for the dog – but we say dakh-schund,’ she explained.

Common words Australians and Americans say differently: A GUIDE 

AUSTRALIA

Egg flipper

Powerpoint

Ron 

Footpath 

Petrol station

Super king bed 

Autumn 

Biro 

Blackboard 

Bushfire 

Curtains 

Diary 

Dobber

AMERICA

Spatula

Outlet 

Later on 

Sidewalk

Gas station 

California king bed 

Fall 

Ballpoint 

Chalkboard 

Wildfire 

Drapes 

Planner

Snitch 

 

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‘Australians also say reschedule,’ she said when an emphasis on the ‘sh’ sound, ‘but Americans say re-schedule like two words.’

She also added that everyone in the States refers to making plans by ‘putting it in the planner’ while Australians prefer to use the word ‘diary’ instead.

The last thing she noticed in her video was the ‘super king bed’ as compared to a ‘California king.’

The young woman owns the swimwear label Siempre Golden and hosts events such as Halloween mixers in Sydney

The young woman owns the swimwear label Siempre Golden and hosts events such as Halloween mixers in Sydney

Previously, Ms Kim revealed she was taken aback when she got her first taste of winter in Australia.

In a TikTok video titled ‘When you move from Los Angeles to Sydney’, she said she couldn’t believe how cold the Harbour City gets once June begins. 

She had been bundling up in hats, puffer jackets and Ugg boots to keep out the chill as the mercury continues to drop.

‘It’s 46 degrees Fahrenheit right now so that’s 7 degrees Celsius and I’m wearing puffer coats, layers on layers every single day,’ she said.

Sophia Kim was shocked at the cold weather after moving to Sydney during 2020

Sophia Kim was shocked at the cold weather after moving to Sydney during 2020

Ms Kim assumed she would be living in bikinis all year round

She couldn't believe how cold the Harbour City can get during winter

Ms Kim (left and right) assumed she would be living in bikinis all year round and couldn’t believe how cold the Harbour City can get during winter

‘I’m wearing gloves, I’m the person to be wearing gloves in the group and everyone’s like, “What are you doing?”‘ she added.

But Sophia’s observation, which has been viewed 14,900 times since it was uploaded online on June 11, drew widespread agreement.

‘People don’t like to admit that Sydney gets f*****g freezing,’ one person wrote.

‘No Aussies will admit how cold it gets, like wearing gloves and being prepared for the cold is not common,’ said a second.

A third added: ‘Sydney winter is the worst.’

Others told her to travel further south to Melbourne if she wants to experience a real Australian winter.

Ms Kim, who recently moved from Rose Bay to Sydney CBD, said she is constantly wearing gloves to keep out the winter chill

Ms Kim, who recently moved from Rose Bay to Sydney CBD, said she is constantly wearing gloves to keep out the winter chill

The founder of swimwear label Siempre Golden said she has been wearing 'layers and layers' every day

The founder of swimwear label Siempre Golden said she has been wearing ‘layers and layers’ every day

‘It’s really not that bad, go to Melbourne and see. It’s like three seasons in a day,’ said one woman.

While Sophia’s complaints may sound exaggerated, she and millions of Australians have weathered a record-breakingly cold start to winter this year.

Australia’s east coast shivered through the longest May cold streak in half a century, with temperatures plunging to single digits in major cities.

The unseasonably cold snap was caused by icy polar air from Antarctica creeping its way over the Southern Ocean past Tasmania and Victoria and onto New South Wales, the ACT and Queensland.

In some areas the mercury plummeted well below freezing, reaching -7.5C at Glen Innes in Northern NSW and -9.5C at Perisher in the state’s Alpine region. 

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