Stan Grant’s ‘asphyxiating anger’ not being able to talk about Aboriginal issues after Queen’s death

Stan Grant’s ‘asphyxiating anger’ over being forced to stay silent about Aboriginal suffering as the Queen is mourned – as the ABC’s TWO top stories attack Her Majesty’s legacy

A fired-up Stan Grant has vented his frustration at being unable to speak up about ongoing Aboriginal issues in the wake of the Queen‘s death.

The veteran journalist, who is of Aboriginal heritage, said he felt ‘asphyxiating anger’ at being forced to remain silent out of respect for the late monarch.

‘We aren’t supposed to talk about colonisation, empire, violence about Aboriginal sovereignty, not even about the republic,’ he wrote in an opinion piece for the ABC.

A fired-up Stan Grant has vented his frustration at being unable to speak up about ongoing Aboriginal issues in the wake of The Queen's death

A fired-up Stan Grant has vented his frustration at being unable to speak up about ongoing Aboriginal issues in the wake of The Queen’s death

The veteran journalist, who is of Aboriginal heritage, said he felt 'asphyxiating anger' he has been forced to remain silent out of respect for the late monarch

The veteran journalist, who is of Aboriginal heritage, said he felt ‘asphyxiating anger’ he has been forced to remain silent out of respect for the late monarch

‘I’m sure I am not alone amongst Indigenous people wrestling with swirling emotions.’

The ABC, which employs Grant as its international affairs analyst, also looked at the dark side of The Queen’s reign.

Grant’s piece was one of the national broadcaster’s top two stories on Sunday, both of which criticised the monarchy – breaking with the media’s otherwise respectful observance of the mourning period.

‘Queen Elizabeth’s empire is a shadow of its former might – but its damage can’t be undone,’ the first headline read.

The second was the opinion piece written by Grant airing his frustration with the headline: ‘As my colleagues have worn black in mourning for the Queen, I’ve wrestled with asphyxiating anger — and I’m not alone’.

Grant said he was ‘wrestling with swirling emotions’ wanting to speak up on Aboriginal issues but being told it was not an appropriate time.

‘Everyone from the prime minister on down has told us it is not appropriate,’ he said.

The ABC, which employs Grant as its international affairs analyst, also looked at the dark side of The Queen's reign

The ABC, which employs Grant as its international affairs analyst, also looked at the dark side of The Queen’s reign

Grant turned his attention to the latest push by prime minister Anthony Albanese to introduce an Indigenous Voice to Parliament

Grant turned his attention to the latest push by prime minister Anthony Albanese to introduce an Indigenous Voice to Parliament

The death of Queen Elizabeth II has prompted a number of high-profile Aboriginal Australians to criticise her 70 year reign

The death of Queen Elizabeth II has prompted a number of high-profile Aboriginal Australians to criticise her 70 year reign

Grant touched on the racism experienced by his family and witnessed first-hand.

He recalled stories from his mother who grew up poor in regional NSW and almost missed out on seeing the Queen during her 1954 visit.

His mother could not afford socks and almost missed out on a day trip with her school because of it – but managed to borrow her brother’s pair just in time.

Grant shared stories of his grandfather being tied to a tree, his aunts and uncles being taken to welfare homes and his family living in poverty.

‘The girl with no socks got to see the Queen, while her family and other black families lived in poverty that the Crown inflicted on them,’ he wrote.

‘Living homeless in a land that had been stolen from them in the name of the Crown.’ 

Grant turned his attention to the push by prime minister Anthony Albanese to introduce an Indigenous Voice to Parliament. 

‘Australians will likely vote in a referendum for a constitutionally enshrined Indigenous Voice to Parliament, but what good would that voice be if at times like these it is reduced to a whisper?’ he wrote.

The Indigenous Voice to Parliament is proposed to be an elected body of First Nations representatives enshrined in the constitution that would advise the government on issues affecting them. 

Indigenous NRLW star Caitlin Moran was also served a one-game ban after appearing to celebrate the Queen's death in a since-deleted Instagram post

Indigenous NRLW star Caitlin Moran was also served a one-game ban after appearing to celebrate the Queen’s death in a since-deleted Instagram post 

Indigenous Australian newsreader Narelda Jacobs (pictured) called on Britain to apologise for its colonisation of First Nations people following the death of Queen Elizabeth II

Indigenous Australian newsreader Narelda Jacobs (pictured) called on Britain to apologise for its colonisation of First Nations people following the death of Queen Elizabeth II

The Queen’s death has prompted high-profile Aboriginal Australians to criticise her 70-year reign.

She was head of state during the Stolen Generation and before Aboriginal Australians were finally recognised as citizens at the 1967 referendum. 

The AFL sparked backlash after announcing it would not observe a minute of silence for The Queen’s death during the AFLW Indigenous Round out of sensitivity.

Indigenous NRLW star Caitlin Moran was also served a one-game ban after appearing to celebrate the Queen’s death in a since-deleted Instagram post.

Indigenous Channel 10 newsreader Narelda Jacobs called on Britain to apologise for its colonisation of First Nations.

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