Star of Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins is set to lose appeal to keep 44ft-long steel garden decking


Revealed: Star of Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins is homeowner set to lose appeal to keep 44ft long £6,000 decking he installed on steel poles so his ‘children could play in privacy’

  • A family from South Wales is set to lose an appeal to keep their gigantic and ‘unsightly’ garden decking 
  • The 44ft long garden decking is suspended on steel stilts and at 16ft tall, the structure towers over the street
  • Jamie Davies, 38, said he built the enormous structure to give his children privacy when they played outside
  • He originally erected the super decking without the council’s planning permission and is battling to keep it
  • A retrospective application is set to be denied after a planning officer said it had an adverse ‘visual impact’
  • Davies is one of the contestants on the latest series of Channel 4’s reality show SAS: Who Dares Wins  
  • He is one of 20 regular citizens enduring a condensed version of Special Forces’ gruelling selection process 

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A contestant on the latest series of Channel 4‘s SAS: Who Dares Wins is set to lose a protracted planning battle to keep ‘unsightly’ garden decking which is 44ft long and towers 16ft over the street below.

Jamie Davies, 38, put up the super structure on a huge steel frame in a bid to give his family privacy in their garden in South Wales.

But the sports centre manager failed to apply for planning permission for the mega decking covering the sloping side of his modern detached garden.

Jamie’s bid for retrospective planning permission is set to be refused after council planners said it was ‘an unduly dominant feature’. 

It comes two years after Jamie first applied for back-dated permission for the £6,000 decking and was refused with planners slamming it as ‘unsightly’ and ‘setting an undesirable precedent’.

Jamie stars in the latest version of the popular Channel 4 reality series in which regular citizens are subjected to a condensed version of the UK Special Forces’ gruelling selection process. 

Jamie Davies on Channel 4's SAS: Who Dares Wins. The sports centre manager, 38, set to lose his appeal to keep 44ft long £6,000 super decking he installed on steel poles so his 'children could play in privacy' as long-running planning battle approaches an end

Jamie Davies on Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins. The sports centre manager, 38, set to lose his appeal to keep 44ft long £6,000 super decking he installed on steel poles so his ‘children could play in privacy’ as long-running planning battle approaches an end

The 44ft long decking (pictured) is held up by a huge steel frame and towers 16ft above the street in South Wales

The 44ft long decking (pictured) is held up by a huge steel frame and towers 16ft above the street in South Wales

Cllr Bernard Willis called the decking (pictured) 'the most appalling thing' he had ever seen in his life at a Blaenau Gwent council planning committee hearing

Cllr Bernard Willis called the decking (pictured) ‘the most appalling thing’ he had ever seen in his life at a Blaenau Gwent council planning committee hearing

Jamie Davies with wife Sarah Jayne and their children

Jamie Davies with wife Sarah Jayne and their children

Jamie stars in the latest version of the popular Channel 4's popular documentary series in which regular citizens are subjected to a condensed version of the UK Special Forces' gruelling selection process

Jamie stars in the latest version of the popular Channel 4’s popular documentary series in which regular citizens are subjected to a condensed version of the UK Special Forces’ gruelling selection process

Jamie said the decking had been put up to provide ‘privacy for the children while they play’.

Planning officer Joanne White said: ‘The application is not significantly different to that previously refused by planning committee and the planning inspector.

She added there are ‘other ways’ to increase the usable space of the garden.

‘I do not consider this is a reason in which to allow an unacceptable development.’

Ms White said that planning permission should be refused as it would be ‘an unduly dominant feature’ that has an adverse visual ‘impact upon the street scene.’

The council will discuss the plans at a future meeting, where the fate of the super decking will be decided.

At a 2020 planning committee meeting to consider a different application to keep the same super decking, planning officers slammed the structure as ‘unsightly’ and setting an ‘undesirable precedent for similar structures throughout the estate’.

The sports centre manager (pictured during SAS: Who Dares Wins shooting) failed to apply for planning permission for the mega decking covering the sloping side of his modern detached garden

The sports centre manager (pictured during SAS: Who Dares Wins shooting) failed to apply for planning permission for the mega decking covering the sloping side of his modern detached garden

Homeowner Jamie Davies, 38, spent £6,000 erecting the super structure on his house (pictured here before the decking was installed) which he said was intended to give his children privacy while they played in the garden

Homeowner Jamie Davies, 38, spent £6,000 erecting the super structure on his house (pictured here before the decking was installed) which he said was intended to give his children privacy while they played in the garden

The monstrous decking has been at the centre of a protracted planning row for over three years, as an initial failure to get planning permission led to the need to make several back-dated retroactive applications - the latest of which looks likely to be rejected by the council's planning committee

The monstrous decking has been at the centre of a protracted planning row for over three years, as an initial failure to get planning permission led to the need to make several back-dated retroactive applications – the latest of which looks likely to be rejected by the council’s planning committee

At the council planning committee meeting, Cllr Bernard Willis called the decking ‘the most appalling thing I have ever seen in my life’, according to South Wales Argus.

He continued: ‘If that was being built near my house I would be appalled.

‘I think it is a dreadful thing to be looking at and in my view we should not be approving this application.’

Garden decking became popular from the late 1990’s – with makeover show Ground Force getting the blame for the boom.

Retailer B&Q reported an increase in sales of the lawn alternative from £5,000 in 1997 to a staggering £16million in 2001.

Presenter Alan Titchmarsh apologised for the lawn cover-up – saying at the time: ‘I am sorry, I know it’s everywhere these days.’

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