Steve Irwin moment goes viral as he’s bitten by snake on live TV in 1991

‘He barely flinches!’ Wild Steve Irwin moment goes viral as footage resurfaces of him being bitten by a snake on live TV

Steve Irwin fans have been whipped into a frenzy after footage resurfaced of the late ‘Crocodile Hunter’ laughing off a python bite during a live TV interview in 1991.

Pop culture website Life Without Andy posted the video on Instagram on Thursday of a young Steve presenting a non-venomous python on a children’s show.

The snake begins wrapping itself around the famous zookeeper’s neck and he calmly tells the female host: ‘You might have to cut the shot, he’s biting my neck.’

Fans of Steve Irwin (pictured) have been whipped into a frenzy after footage resurfaced of the late 'Crocodile Hunter' laughing off a python bite during a live TV interview in 1991

Fans of Steve Irwin (pictured) have been whipped into a frenzy after footage resurfaced of the late ‘Crocodile Hunter’ laughing off a python bite during a live TV interview in 1991 

The shocked presenter then asks Steve: ‘Oh my God, look at that. Did that hurt?’

However, the wildlife warrior doesn’t appear fazed, saying it didn’t hurt and apologising for the interruption.

Fans went wild over the archive footage, with one remarking how Steve ‘barely flinches’ when the snake bites him, while another says he was ‘the greatest’.

Pop culture website Life Without Andy posted the video on Instagram on Thursday of a young Steve presenting a non-venomous python on a children's show

Pop culture website Life Without Andy posted the video on Instagram on Thursday of a young Steve presenting a non-venomous python on a children’s show 

Following the death of the Queen last year, a petition circulated online for Steve’s face to feature on new Australian $5 bills. 

Vincent Wu and Kirby Miles were behind the move, submitting their petition on the Australian Parliament House website.

‘There is no one more vital to the Australian culture and identity than Steve Irwin,’ the petition reads.

The snake begins wrapping itself around the famous zookeeper's neck and he calmly tells the female host: 'You might have to cut the shot, he's biting my neck'

The snake begins wrapping itself around the famous zookeeper’s neck and he calmly tells the female host: ‘You might have to cut the shot, he’s biting my neck’ 

‘Steve is beloved by all and has become synonymous with the Australian values we hold so dearly,’ it continues. 

‘He epitomised the spirit of mateship; he deeply loved the Australian Wildlife, working hard towards conservation and education but perhaps most importantly he’s just a good bloke.’

Steve Irwin, known to millions around the world as ‘the Crocodile Hunter’, died on September 4, 2006, at the age of 44 after being pierced in the chest by a stingray while filming a documentary on the Great Barrier Reef.

He is survived by his by his wife Terri and their children Bindi and Robert, who have carried on his conservation legacy at Australia Zoo.

Steve Irwin, known to millions around the world as 'the Crocodile Hunter', died on September 4, 2006, at age 44 after being pierced in the chest by a stingray while filming a documentary

Steve Irwin, known to millions around the world as ‘the Crocodile Hunter’, died on September 4, 2006, at age 44 after being pierced in the chest by a stingray while filming a documentary

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