Subway gifts Australian woman $2,664 after she was fined for failure to declare her foot-long sub

Heartwarming gift given to woman whose Subway sandwich cost her $2,664 after she breached biosecurity laws ‘makes the fine worth it’

  • Subway gifted 19-year-old Jessica Lee merchandise and a $2,664 store card  
  • The Aussie teen went viral after she was fined for failing to declare her foot-long
  • She said she ate half her sub at Singapore Airport but saved the rest for her flight
  • Ms Lee was found to have breached biosecurity laws by bringing the food in 

An Australian woman fined $2,664 for failing to declare a Subway sandwich at the airport has received a surprising gift from the fast-food giant.   

Jessica Lee bought the foot-long sandwich in Singapore with the intent of finishing the second half of it on the flight on her way home to Australia. 

The 19-year-old copped the massive penalty for breaching Australia’s biosecurity laws when she forgot to declare two ingredients in her sandwich – chicken and lettuce. 

In a heartwarming twist on Tuesday, Subway gifted Ms Lee with a $2,664 gift card – the same amount as her fine. 

Perth woman Jessica Lee was surprised with a gift from Subway (pictured) after she was fined for failing to declare her foot-long sub while on the way home from Singapore

Perth woman Jessica Lee was surprised with a gift from Subway (pictured) after she was fined for failing to declare her foot-long sub while on the way home from Singapore 

‘Subway makes my fine worth every single cent,’ Ms Lee said in a TikTok video.

‘Looking at positives over negatives always pays off.’

Subway sent the Perth model a white gift-wrapped box full of merchandise and a personal letter after the franchise heard about her unfortunate travel error. 

‘To say thank you for eating fresh, we’ve uploaded a sub card with $2,664 just for you,’ the letter read.

‘We hope this covers all your chicken and lettuce needs. Love from your Subway fans.’

Subway gifted the 19-year-old a box of merchandise (pictured) and a $2,664 store gift card - the same amount as her fine

Subway gifted the 19-year-old a box of merchandise (pictured) and a $2,664 store gift card – the same amount as her fine

Ms Lee unboxed her gift and donned a Subway hat and hair scrunchy before telling her viewers: ‘You can best guess what I’m having for lunch and dinner today’. 

‘Subway, you have outdone yourself and this fine is worth every single penny,’ the shocked Ms Lee said. 

In a previous TikTok video, the young woman told her followers she took ownership for her blunder by paying her fine and shared her story so that other travellers don’t make the same mistake. 

Ms Lee said she didn’t declare her food because she assumed the form only applied to pre-purchased items in carry-on suitcases and check-in luggage.   

‘I didn’t tick chicken and I didn’t tick lettuce. Chicken and lettuce,’ Ms Lee said.

‘And that is a nice little $2,664… to be paid in 28 days.

‘Such an expensive rookie mistake.’

Ms Lee didn’t end up finishing the sandwich on her journey home and was caught out by Australian customs officers for failing to declare the chicken and lettuce in the sandwich. 

Travellers are given an Incoming Passenger Card, which is a legal document, while onboard a flight and are required to declare all vegetables and meat products. 

The Perth model (pictured) was fined for breaching Australia's biosecurity laws when she forgot to declare two ingredients in her sandwich - chicken and lettuce

The Perth model (pictured) was fined for breaching Australia’s biosecurity laws when she forgot to declare two ingredients in her sandwich – chicken and lettuce

Ms Lee said she was unaware she had to declare food purchased after checking-in her bags

The 19-year-old paid her $2,664 fine after describing it as a 'rookie mistake'

Ms Lee shared her travel blunder in a TikTok video (pictured) and explained she didn’t declare her food because she assumed the form only applied to pre-purchased items in carry-on suitcases and check-in luggage

Failure to declare or false declarations carry fines up to $2,664 for breaching the Bioscecuirty Act.

‘Our biosecurity system works both at the border and here at home to prevent and respond to the arrival and spread of harmful pests and diseases,’ a Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry told 7NEWS

‘Those pests and diseases could disrupt our agricultural industries, our natural environment and our national economy.

‘Food and ingredients that have not met our biosecurity standards (or cannot be shown to have met them) are common and high-risk pathways for these threats.’ 

Biosecurity requirements 

Australia has strict biosecurity controls to help minimise the risk of pests and diseases entering the country. 

All travellers must complete an Incoming Passenger Card (IPC).

Passengers must mark ‘YES’ on the IPC to declare they are carrying certain food, plant material or animal products.

If a traveller declares goods on the IPC they are directed to an inspection point on arrival where a biosecurity officer will assess the items.

If a passenger does not want to declare goods they are to dispose of them in the bins at the terminal before the inspection points.

In many cases, items are returned after inspection. Other items are kept for treatment to make them safe before they are returned. 

Items not allowed into Australia because of risk of pests and disease are seized and exported or destroyed.

Penalties or fines may apply for undeclared or use of an incorrect permit.

 

Source: Smartraveller.gov.au

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