The Chase’s Paul Sinha hits back at troll who criticised his grammar amid Parkinson’s battle

Sponsored Video
Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •  
  •  
    1
    Share

The Chase’s Paul Sinha hit back at a troll who criticised his grammar on Tuesday, as he Tweeted: ‘I make mistakes due to changed life circumstances’. 

The ITV quiz genius, 50, who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s in June last year, came under fire for putting an apostrophe in ‘yours’ in the Tweet: ‘Opinions are like a*******s. Each time you display your’s in a tweet, you do end up losing followers.’ 

But one follower corrected Paul, writing back: ‘You’ll also lose followers when you don’t know that “yours” doesn’t require an apostrophe’. 

Health: The Chase's Paul Sinha hit back at a troll who criticised his grammar on Tuesday, as he Tweeted: 'I make mistakes due to changed life circumstances' (pictured this month)

Health: The Chase’s Paul Sinha hit back at a troll who criticised his grammar on Tuesday, as he Tweeted: ‘I make mistakes due to changed life circumstances’ (pictured this month)

Grammar police: The ITV quiz genius, 49, who was diagnosed with Parkinson's in June last year, came under fire for putting an apostrophe in 'yours' in the Tweet

Grammar police: The ITV quiz genius, 49, who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s in June last year, came under fire for putting an apostrophe in ‘yours’ in the Tweet

Alluding to his ongoing battle with Parkinson’s- a condition where parts of the brain become progressively damaged, The Sinnerman replied: ‘I think there is a big difference between “don’t know” and “I make mistakes due to changed life circumstances”.’

‘Nonetheless having read your tweets, I understand your sense of intellectual superiority. After all…’

Fans flooded to the comment section to show their support to Paul.  

Important: Alluding to his battle with Parkinson's, The Sinnerman replied: 'I think there is a big difference between "don't know" and "I make mistakes due to changed life circumstances".'

Important: Alluding to his battle with Parkinson’s, The Sinnerman replied: ‘I think there is a big difference between “don’t know” and “I make mistakes due to changed life circumstances”.’

Ignore the haters! Fans flooded to the comment section to show their support to Paul

Ignore the haters! Fans flooded to the comment section to show their support to Paul

One follower wrote: ‘Well said Paul but please don’t waste time on unkind people, they are not worthy of a response!’.

Another added: ‘Steady on Sinhaman… you don’t want to enrage those 16 followers that this Grammar Police Officer has amassed,’ while a third fan chimed: ‘It’s not that I don’t know either but I blame my auto correct and then myself for not reading it back before I post sometimes I dictate and forget to say the punctuation before I don’t read it back’.

‘Paul, I think you’re lovely. people are only nasty when they’re insanely jealous. it’s a reflection on who they are,’ another follower typed. 

Impressive: Back in May, Paul declared 'f**k Parkinson's' as he shared a defiant post amid his health battle

Impressive: Back in May, Paul declared ‘f**k Parkinson’s’ as he shared a defiant post amid his health battle

Back in May, Paul declared ‘f**k Parkinson’s’ as he shared a defiant post amid his health battle.

The Chase star appeared in great spirits as he showed off his hula-hooping skills in the garden. 

What is Parkinson’s?

Parkinson’s is a condition in which parts of the brain become progressively damaged

The three main symptoms are: involuntary shaking (tremor), slow movement, stiff and inflexible muscles

As the condition progresses, the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease can get worse

Parkinson’s disease doesn’t directly cause people to die, but the condition can place great strain on the body

Credit source: NHS 

Advertisement

Throwing his hands up in the air with delight, the quiz player took advantage of the hottest day of the year as he picked up the hobby during the UK’s coronavirus lockdown.

In June last year, the comedian revealed he had been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, vowing to ‘fight with every breath I have’.

Expanding further in an impassioned blog post, the funnyman said he was initially ‘in shock’, but ‘feels far more prepared for the new challenges ahead’ now he has a treatment plan in place.

Displaying he trademark humour, the TV star also joked that a Dancing On Ice appearance is now ‘out of the question’, before thanking his family and fiancé for their support in the wake of his diagnosis. 

Paul – who has has been a chaser on the popular quiz show since 2011 – admitted it has ‘been a really, really tough two weeks’ since he got the diagnosis but now he has a treatment plan in place he feels ‘prepared for the new challenges ahead’.

Parkinson’s is a condition in which parts of the brain become progressively damaged.

The three main symptoms are: involuntary shaking (tremor), slow movement, stiff and inflexible muscles. As the condition progresses, the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease can get worse.

Parkinson’s disease doesn’t directly cause people to die, but the condition can place great strain on the body. 

The joy of his life: In the romance department, Paul tied the knot to his long-term partner Olly in front of 38 guests last winter

The joy of his life: In the romance department, Paul tied the knot to his long-term partner Olly in front of 38 guests last winter 

Paul’s brave announcement in full 

On the evening of Thursday May 30th, an experienced consultant neurologist calmly informed me that I had Parkinson’s disease. 

It was a devastating denouement to a medical odyssey that began in September 2017 with a sudden-onset, frozen right shoulder, and took in an unexpected diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes, a lifestyle transformation that enabled me to lose two stone, and a shoulder operation in January this year. 

Nonetheless my reaction was not one of shock. I spent May this year in New Zealand simultaneously having the comedy month of my life, and worrying about why a right-sided limp was now getting worse. 

Behind the facade of the cheerful, late night comedy festival drunk was a man deeply scared about facing the truth when back in the UK. It has been a really, really tough two weeks. 

Cancelling my run at the Edinburgh Fringe, missing the World Quizzing Championships to have brain scans, performing club sets whilst emotionally bewildered, and of course working my way through my loved ones, delivering the bad news. 

With the diagnosis now confirmed, and a treatment plan in place, I now feel far more prepared for the new challenges ahead. 

I have an amazing family, no strangers to serious medical illness, I’m blessed to have a fiancé who is there for me, and I have a multitude of friends and colleagues whom I consider to be exceptional human beings. 

I don’t consider myself unlucky, and whatever the next stage of my life holds for me, many others have it far worse. 

In the time since my Parkinson’s started I have been ludicrously busy, and fully intend to keep Chasing, keep writing and performing comedy, keep quizzing and keep being hopeless at Tasks. 

Dancing on Ice is, I suspect, out of the question. A lot of people have asked “What can I do to help ?” The answer is to treat me exactly the same as before. Much love, Paul

Advertisement

Source


Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •  
  •  
    1
    Share

Related posts