The Crown star Claire Foy reveals she is gripped with fear after stalker is spared jail

‘I will be scared to leave my front door’: The Crown star Claire Foy reveals she is gripped with fear inside her own home after stalker’s campaign as American paranoid schizophrenic, 49, is spared jail and sent back to live with his mother in the US

  • The Crown star remains terrified after stalker Jason Penrose came to her home
  • Stalker Penrose also spoke to her seven-year-old daughter through an intercom
  • The American stalker was illegally in Britain, and handed a suspended sentence  

Claire Foy is afraid to leave her home and feels scared when the doorbell rings, a court heard yesterday, as a stalker she feared could kill her was spared jail. 

The Crown star, who played the Queen in the first two series of the Netflix show, said she remains terrified after Jason Penrose turned up at her home and spoke to her seven-year-old daughter through an intercom. 

‘I view the world in a much more fearful way as a direct result of his actions,’ she said. Penrose, 49, bombarded Ms Foy with thousands of emails, left eight switchboard messages and even sent a parcel and letter to her home after being banned from contacting her for five years. 

The American, who is in Britain illegally, was spared jail at the Old Bailey after a judge heard that he will be repatriated to his home country to live with his mother in Florida. He was sentenced to 22 months’ imprisonment, suspended for two years.

Claire Foy suffers sleepless nights and has even begged her film industry colleagues not to tag her in pictures in case Penrose uses them to track her movements

It is not known how Penrose, who was here illegally, came to the UK.

A court previously heard that Penrose sent Ms Foy more than 1,000 emails explicit emails, including one referring to rape, within a month.

He also turned up at her home on December 17 last year and repeatedly rang her doorbell.

On Friday, Judge David Aaronberg KC said he remains ‘troubled’ that Penrose, a paranoid schizophrenic, ‘may continue to be infatuated with Ms Foy’, despite having been repeatedly told she wants no contact from him.

The conditions of his suspended sentence include that he must remain under the care of a psychiatrist in the UK until his repatriation, and that he must co-operate fully with his return to the US.

The court heard that he will return to Florida to live with his mother and receive further psychiatric care.

If he returns to the UK during his suspended sentence, he must notify the Metropolitan Police of his arrival, telling them where he intends to stay and for how long.

The court previously heard how The Crown actress was left suffering sleepless nights and even begged her film industry colleagues not to tag her in pictures in case Penrose used them to track her movements.

Judge David Aaronberg told the court he doesn't want stalker Jason Penrose, 49, to be able to come back into the UK

Penrose pictured leaving the Old Bailey today after being handed a suspended sentence

In November, Penrose admitted stalking and breaching a stalking ban.

His sentencing hearing at Wood Green Crown was delayed from last month after the court was warned he would continue to contact Ms Foy.

Penrose, who has been receiving psychiatric treatment at Whittington Hospital in north London, was also warned he faced deportation to the US as he came to the UK illegally.

He has now spent almost 12 months detained in hospital at the expense of the British taxpayer.

Speaking at the time, Judge Aaronberg adjourned his sentencing because he said he needed the Home Office to ensure that Penrose will be deported.

He said: ‘If decisions are made to get him deported, then I am likely to give him a suspended sentence with a restraining order.

‘I want to make it part of any restraining order that he can’t enter the country. If he stops taking his medication he is likely going to become a pest again, but he doesn’t mean to be a pest.

‘I can see that he has an unhealthy obsession with Ms Foy and he can’t stop trying to contact her.

‘Ms Foy wants to know what is going to happen to him. He wants to know what is going to happen to him. But I’m afraid I need something more either from the Home Office or the doctors.’

The court heard how Ms Foy had been ‘targeted by Mr Penrose in a sustained, unwanted, fixated and obsessive behaviour that was intrusive due to his delusional beliefs’.

Varinder Hayre, prosecuting, said: ‘Mr Penrose was claiming she was interested in him romantically and he did believe she would like to star in a movie he was planning to make.’

Penrose pictured leaving the Old Bailey today after being handed a suspended sentence

Penrose pictured leaving the Old Bailey today after being handed a suspended sentence

Penrose launched a ‘campaign of consistent stalking’ sending thousands of emails, eight switchboard messages and going to the star’s home.

Between August and September 2021 alone, Natalie Day, an employee at Ms Foy’s talent agency, received 287 emails and eight switchboard messages from Penrose.

On the night he went to Ms Foy’s address, the door intercom was answered by her daughter, and Penrose said: ‘It’s Jason, I’m outside.’

The stalking left the actress ‘in genuine fear for her safety and terrified and helpless in her own home.’

Penrose initially contacted Ms Foy through her agent and publicist claiming to be a movie producer.

He said he was a scriptwriter with a $20m deal with Warner Brothers Studio and wanted Ms Foy to act in his sci-fi film.

Penrose also tried to contact Ms Foy on LinkedIn and Instagram.

Ms Hayre described some of the emails sent by Penrose as ‘quite graphic.’

She said: ‘He talked about the victim Ms Foy being raped and wanted her to be his girlfriend.

‘There were pictures of Mr Penrose himself in various hotels and locations in Camden.’

Penrose also contacted Ms Foy’s sister by email and ex-boyfriend by text.

On 10 December 2021, Ms Foy was informed by a local café owner that Penrose had turned up asking where she was, knowing it was a place she would regularly visit.

‘Ms Foy was terrified as she did not know what his intention was. She was in fear for her and her daughter’s lives,’ said Mr Hayre.

‘She was frightened knowing he was somewhere.’

Penrose initially contacted Ms Foy through her agent and publicist claiming to be a movie producer. Pictured, Ms Foy in The Crown

Penrose initially contacted Ms Foy through her agent and publicist claiming to be a movie producer. Pictured, Ms Foy in The Crown

The stalking had ‘an extreme effect on her life and peace of mind.’

‘She struggles to sleep and is terrified in her own home. She feels like the freedoms before Mr Penrose contacted her have now gone,’ Mr Hayre added.

Ms Foy even asked friends not to tag or picture her in photos at social events for fear of Mr Penrose being able to track where she is.

In a letter written to court Ms Foy said: ‘His relentless attempts to contact me are so traumatic. Every time I think this is sorted it is not.

‘I feel like there is nothing that would stop him being able to contact me, he has affected every aspect of my life.’

The actress played the Queen in the first two series of Netflix’s hit show and has won a Golden Globe, two Emmy Awards and two Screen Actors Guild Awards.

She was granted an interim stalking protection order earlier this year, but despite the order Penrose sent her another letter and a parcel from the hospital where he was being treated.

Sentencing Penrose today, Judge David Aaronberg told Penrose: ‘You are an American citizen with a history of mental health issues going back at least until 2015 and it appears were not taking any medication to assist with these issues since 2017 or 2018.

‘In 2018 or 2019, you indicated to those treating you that you went to live in the Republic of Ireland.

‘You have explained to those who have been treating you that you were writing screenplays and it was during that time that you first became aware of the actress, Claire Foy.

‘You became infatuated with her, deluding yourself that she would be willing to act in a film and that you had some sort of romantic attachment to her… You began sending emails to her agents, both in the UK and the USA.

‘I have seen the content of much of this material and it would have been apparent to anyone reading them that you were a man who had some sort of mental health problem.

‘In particular you had, and to some extent still have, a persistent delusional disorder, leading you to believe that Ms Foy wished to communicate with you and engage in some sort of relationship with you, on both a professional and personal basis.

‘The reality is that Ms Foy has never met you, never responded to the hundreds of requests which you have made to see her and wants nothing whatsoever to do with you.’

Judge Aaronberg confirmed that Penrose had sought to enter the UK on 5 October 2021 but was refused entry and sent back to Lisbon where he had come from.

‘There is no trace of you having been issued with entry clearance for lawful entry to the UK, but you somehow returned,’ the judge said.

Adjourning sentence until January 20 Judge Aaronberg said he needs the Home Office to ensure that Penrose will be deported. Pictured, Ms Foy in The Crown

Adjourning sentence until January 20 Judge Aaronberg said he needs the Home Office to ensure that Penrose will be deported. Pictured, Ms Foy in The Crown

‘The fact that you are here did not come to the attention of the Home Office until you were arrested in relation to the present offending. You are here unlawfully and liable to deportation or administrative removal.’

Whilst having been detained in hospital, a doctor noted on 23 November that Penrose still held ‘persecutory delusion beliefs’.

Judge Aaronberg told the court that this included: ‘that an international gang was after you and you were markedly grandiose, for example believing that a film director was stealing your ideas.

‘You were, when examined, not willing to accept that you previously held delusional beliefs about Ms Foy and still, in the doctor’s opinion, did not appreciate that your behaviour towards her was inappropriate.

‘He was also concerned that you might become fixated, if not on Ms Foy, then on another woman and behave inappropriately again.’

A pre-sentence report concluded that Penrose continued to present a high risk with enduring delusional beliefs linked to his delusional disorder diagnosis.

Speaking of the pain Ms Foy went through, Judge Aaronberg said: ‘Ms Foy suffered great emotional anxiety and difficulty sleeping as a result of your behaviour.

‘She has felt very vulnerable and has had to make significant lifestyle changes, especially since you turned up at her home in December 2021.

‘She had to spend substantial amounts of money on security in order to feel more secure.

‘She has become scared and suspicious of post which she does not recognise and of her front doorbell ringing. She told the police that she was frightened to leave her property in case you might follow her. She has expressed the view that she does not know what you might be capable of.’

Ms Foy wrote to the court: ‘I have felt terrified and helpless in my own home. I have had to have numerous meetings with my daughters’ school, neighbours, family members and work colleagues who had all been affected by Mr Penrose’s stalking and harassment and all have legitimate fears and concerns regarding his behaviours.

‘I will again be scared to leave my front door, pick my daughter up from school and return home at night. I will have to follow police guidelines of having my phone on at all times, remaining alert and fearful…. I feel like the freedoms I enjoyed before Mr Penrose contacted me have now gone and I view the world in a much more fearful way as a direct result of his actions…’

Penrose earlier admitted stalking involving serious alarm or distress – which carries the maximum sentence of 10 years jail – under the Protection from Harassment Act 1997.

He also admitted two breaches of a stalking protection order.

Judge Aaronberg previously said the court has received a handwritten letter, apparently written by Penrose.

‘This is somebody who is demonstrating in the letter that they have some kind of obsession with Ms Foy and that they are likely to write again on occasion, but promise they will not persist in ringing her doorbell.

‘It is not a threatening document in any way at all. It’s various jottings and ramblings on a torn piece of paper.’

Penrose denied he wrote the letter and said from the dock: ‘It spelt my name wrong’.

But the judge said: ‘I can’t think of anyone else in the world who would have had any motive to send a letter to the court.’

‘I can see that he has an unhealthy obsession with Ms Foy and he can’t stop trying to contact her.’

Penrose, from Florida, was sentenced to one year and 10 months imprisonment, suspended for two years under the condition that he remains under the care of a consultant psychiatrist until his repatriation to the US.

Judge Aaronberg said: ‘I understand that you are willing to be repatriated to the United States voluntarily, rather than waiting to be deported by the Home Office.

‘You will be repatriated to the United States by two members of the staff chosen by the hospital discharge facilitation team. The funding is in place for your transfer.

‘You will be taken to your mother’s home, in Florida. She has kindly agreed to provide you with accommodation.’

He must cooperate fully with his repatriation and coordinate with a member of staff to pick up the passport from Islington police station. Although a flight had not yet been booked, it was Penrose would return to the US sometime next week.

If he returns to the UK, Penrose must notify police and provide his address in the UK, contact details and the duration of his stay.

An indefinite restraining order was also granted, banning Penrose from; contacting or attempting to contact Ms Foy by any means, sending letters, gifts or parcels to her, entering the London Boroughs of Camden or Islington or going within 100 meters of any premises which he knew or ought to know Ms Foy might be present.

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