The Queen is selling £55 homemade walking sticks at her Sandringham estate


Queen is selling £55 handmade walking sticks made of locally-sourced wood at her Sandringham estate – after she adopted a mobility aid earlier this year

  • The Sandringham estate’s royal shop are selling stag horn walking sticks for £55 
  • Sticks are handmade from locally-sourced wood including Hazel, Ash and Yew
  • Queen taken to using walking sticks when out, including Prince Philip’s favourite 

The Queen has started to sell walking sticks at her Sandringham Estate after she’s taken to using one herself. 

The Monarch’s royal shop, on her Norfolk estate, has stocked £55 handmade walking sticks made out of locally-sourced woods. 

Not two of the sticks are alike as they both are made of an unique blend, in a stag horn shape that has been favoured by the Queen in the past. 

The Queen, 96, has taken to using Prince Philip‘s walking sticks when she is out and about. It has been reported she is suffering from periodical mobility issues. 

The Monarch's royal shop, on her Sandringham Royal Estate, has stocked £55 handmade walking sticks made out of locally-sourced woods.

The Monarch’s royal shop, on her Sandringham Royal Estate, has stocked £55 handmade walking sticks made out of locally-sourced woods.

The Queen, 96, has taken to using Prince Philip's walking sticks when she is out and about. It has been reported she is suffering from periodical mobility issues

The Queen, 96, has taken to using Prince Philip’s walking sticks when she is out and about. It has been reported she is suffering from periodical mobility issues

The beautiful sticks are made using traditional methods, and the woods used to make them, which include Hazel, Ash and Yew, were sourced in Norfolk.

Some of the sticks are also made of a wood blend, such as Hazel and Ash together.

The artefacts comes in different lengths and shapes, with handles of different colours and sizes. 

The elegant sticks can be purchased by anyone at the shop, which is located on the royal estate. 

Not two of the sticks are alike as they both are made of an unique blend., in a stag horn shape that has been favoured by the Queen in the past

Not two of the sticks are alike as they both are made of an unique blend., in a stag horn shape that has been favoured by the Queen in the past

The beautiful sticks are made using traditional methods, and the woods used to make them, which include Hazel, Ash and Yew, were sourced in Norfolk

The beautiful sticks are made using traditional methods, and the woods used to make them, which include Hazel, Ash and Yew, were sourced in Norfolk

The royal has been using a stag horn mobility aid in recent weeks and is often spotted with her late husband Prince Philip’s walking stick – which is dark wood with a marble handle.

But on the occasion of her Platinum Jubilee in early June , she ditched the staghorn walking stick for a brand new one. 

 But for the celebrations she instead picked a brand new cane, which appeared to have a marble handle and wooden body and which was made by Cumbria-based traditional stick maker Dennis Wall.

The elegant sticks can be purchased by anyone at the shop, which is located on the royal estate

The elegant sticks can be purchased by anyone at the shop, which is located on the royal estate

Some of the star horn sticks at the shops are also made of a wood blend, such as Hazel and Ash together

Some of the star horn sticks at the shops are also made of a wood blend, such as Hazel and Ash together

General Sir Mark Carleton-Smith, chief of the general staff, had presented her with the gift as a symbol of the British Army’s support.

The walking stick is made of mottled hazel, locally sourced in Cumbria, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) said. The wood is thought of as a protective talisman in English mythology and is traditionally known in Ireland as the ‘Tree of Knowledge’, the MoD added.

Meanwhile, the handle is made from Highland Cow horn, a breed originating in the Scottish Highlands – said to be known for its hardy and robust constitution.

The collar of the stick, made from silver, has been engraved by Sam James Engraving, based in Goldsmiths’ Centre in London.

The Queen left Prince Philip's walking stick at home in May in favour of a stag horn mobility aid as she enjoyed the first of the jubilee celebrations at Windsor Castle

The Queen left Prince Philip’s walking stick at home in May in favour of a stag horn mobility aid as she enjoyed the first of the jubilee celebrations at Windsor Castle

It says: ‘The Army presents its loyal support to THE SOVEREIGN. Platinum Jubilee MCMLII-MMXXII.’ The Army crest is also engraved into the collar.

General Sir Mark said: ‘It was a great privilege in celebration of Her Majesty’s Platinum Jubilee to hand over a small token of our gratitude and appreciation of our sovereign’s contribution to the Army over the last 70 years.

‘We wanted something useful and relevant and always to hand that represented our loyal support and which Her Majesty might find helpful. And this beautiful walking stick, fashioned from mottled hazel with a Highland Cow horn handle, fitted the bill perfectly. It’s elegant, simple and wonderfully handy.’

Last month to kick of the Jubilee celebrations, The Queen favoured a stag horn mobility aid as she enjoyed the first of the jubilee celebrations at Windsor Castle for the Royal Windsor Horse Show. She used the same cane in March at an official engagement at her Windsor Castle home.

Staghorn walking sticks are usually used to blend into natural surroundings when walking outdoors.

The Queen has been spotted with Philip’s trusty stick on many occasions since his death aged 99 in April last year.

The monarch is thought to have taken to using the stick during her stay at Wood Farm, the cottage on the Sandringham estate where the Duke spent his retirement. 

She is often spotted with her late husband's walking stick - which is dark wood with a marble handle (pictured in February at Sandringham)

Philip - who died at the age of 99 last April- was last seen carrying the walking stick publicly in 2013, as he returned to royal duties after undergoing abdominal surgery

She is often spotted with her late husband’s walking stick – which is dark wood with a marble handle (pictured in February at Sandringham). Philip is pictured left in 2013

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