Thompson says he has made ‘multiple statements’ on his gay son’s wedding when asked in Congress 

Republican Rep. Glenn Thompson says he has made ‘multiple statements’ on his gay son’s wedding when confronted in Congress

  • ‘We’ve already made multiple statements, there’s lots of information out there,’ said the congressman, pressed amid hypocrisy criticisms
  • Thompson, 63, has come under a barrage of criticism from the left for his ‘no’ vote on the gay rights bill three days before speaking at his son’s wedding
  • After the vote but before the wedding, his press secretary called the bill a ‘stunt’ meant to distract voters
  • It’s not clear if the Respect for Marriage Act will get the 10 Republican votes needed to clear the Senate 
  • It got 47 Republican votes in the House  

Pennsylvania Rep. Glenn Thompson appears to be avoiding discussing how he squares his support for his son’s gay marriage with his ‘no’ vote on federal protections for gay rights

Asked by DailyMail.com if he had changed his views on the Respect for Marriage Act after giving a heartfelt speech at his son’s nuptials, the Republican congressman said: ‘We’ve already made multiple statements, there’s lots of information out there.’ 

He referred any further questioning to his press secretary, emails to whom have gone unanswered. 

Thompson, 63, a longtime volunteer fireman and therapist and rehab services manager, has come under a barrage of criticism from the left for his ‘no’ vote on the gay rights bill three days before speaking warmly at his son’s wedding. He has not yet spoken to the press about the ‘hypocrisy’ allegations he is facing. 

His press secretary, Maddison Stone, confirmed the wedding in a statement.  

‘Congressman and Mrs. Thompson were thrilled to attend and celebrate their son’s marriage on Friday night as he began this new chapter in his life. The Thompsons are very happy to welcome their new son-in-law into their family,’ she said. 

After the vote but before the wedding, Stone called the bill a ‘stunt’ meant to distract voters. 

‘This bill was nothing more than an election-year messaging stunt for Democrats in Congress who have failed to address historic inflation and out of control prices at gas pumps and grocery stores,’ Stone told the Centre Daily Times. 

Glenn Thompson is pictured during a mock swearing ceremony with his family in 2017

Glenn Thompson is pictured during a mock swearing ceremony with his family in 2017 

Thompson said during the speech that his son finding love had been a 'really good experience,' especially for his wife, Penny, pictured above

Thompson said during the speech that his son finding love had been a ‘really good experience,’ especially for his wife, Penny, pictured above 

Thompson and his wife Penny have three sons

Thompson and his wife Penny have three sons 

Neither Thompson nor his press secretary responded to questions on what Gawker, which first reported the wedding, called the ‘apparent hypocrisy.’ 

Thompson was one of 156 Republicans who voted against the Respect for Marriage Act. Forty-seven Republicans joined their Democratic colleagues and voted in favor of the legislation. 

Some members of House GOP leadership, including Conference Chair Rep. Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y., and National Republican Campaign Committee Chair Rep. Tom Emmer, R-Minn., were yeses on the bill. Other big names like Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., and House Freedom Caucus Chair Scott Perry, R-Pa., also voted yes. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., and House Minority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., voted no on the bill. 

‘If gay couples want to be as happily or miserably married as straight couples, more power to them. Trust me, I’ve tried it more than once,’ Rep. Nancy Mace, R-S.C., another yes, tweeted after the vote. 

Republicans have shifted away from their fiery opposition to same-sex unions in recent years, prompting some to vote no because they believed gay marriage rights were not under threat. 

Democrats, however, have sounded the alarm on gay marriage rights, contraception access and the like since the Supreme Court’s overturning of Roe v. Wade. 

The Supreme Court upheld the same-sex marriages as a right guaranteed under the 14th Amendment in its 2015 ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges, but that ruling rested on the same right to privacy as the Roe ruling had. 

Justice Clarence Thomas in his own concurring opinion stoked concerns by writing that Obergefell and other similar cases should be reconsidered. 

The Respect for Marriage Act now heads to the Senate where it faces an uphill battle to find 10 Republicans who will vote with Democrats to break a filibuster. 

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, said this month that the Supreme Court was ‘clearly wrong’ when it guaranteed the right to same-sex marriage in Obergefell, claiming the decision ‘ignored two centuries of our nation’s history.’  

‘Marriage was always an issue that was left to the states,’ Cruz said in a YouTube posted on July 16. ‘We saw states before that were moving, some states were moving to allow gay marriage; other states were moving to allow civil partnerships.’

In a June 26, 2015 statement, Thompson suggested that his ‘personal belief’ might run up against the Supreme Court’s decision. 

‘Regardless of my personal beliefs and my continued support for states’ rights, today’s ruling must be followed by adequate Congressional oversight in order to assure that federal protections the Supreme Court has granted to same-sex couples does not infringe upon the religious liberties of others.’ 

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