Three more bosses follow Cressida Dick out of Scotland Yard

Met Police top brass faces shake up after years of scandal: Three more bosses follow Cressida Dick out of Scotland Yard as incoming commissioner says he is ‘grateful’ for being able build ‘own leadership team’

  • Sir Stephen House will quit when Sir Mark Rowley begins tenure in September
  • Dept Commissioner Helen Ball has also announced she will retire from policing 
  • Assistant Commissioner Nick Ephgrave will also leave force in he coming weeks

Three of the most senior officers in the Met have announced they are stepping down just weeks before a new commissioner is set to take over with the aim of turning around its shattered reputation. 

Sir Stephen House, who had temporarily taken charge as commissioner in April, will quit when Sir Mark Rowley begins his tenure on September 12.

Deputy Commissioner Helen Ball also announced she will retire from policing after 35 years on October 31, while Assistant Commissioner Nick Ephgrave is to move elsewhere in the coming weeks.

All three officers were either appointed or promoted by Dame Cressida and were seen as her key lieutenants. 

Today, Sir Mark said he was grateful ‘to be given the opportunity to build a fresh leadership team’.  

Stephen House

Nick Ephgrave

Sir Stephen House (left), who had temporarily taken charge as commissioner in April, will quit when Sir Mark Rowley begins his tenure on September 12. Nick Ephgrave is also leaving 

Deputy Commissioner Helen Ball also announced she will retire from policing after 35 years on October 31

Deputy Commissioner Helen Ball also announced she will retire from policing after 35 years on October 31

The incoming police chief faces an uphill battle to repair the Met’s reputation after numerous scandals over misogyny, racism and incompetence led to the force being placed in special measures.  

It comes as applications to replace Mr Ephgrave in the £206,274-a-year job opened in an advert on the force’s website.

Sir Stephen will lead a review of operational productivity in policing overseen by the National Police Chiefs’ Council.

The Scottish police officer has worked in several different forces and was appointed chief constable of Police Scotland in 2012.

However, during his tenure leading the force he faced criticism for his use of armed patrols as well as stop and search.

He resigned in 2015 over the deaths of Lamara Bell and John Yuill, who lay undiscovered in a wrecked car for three days despite a call from a member of the public.

But in 2018, he became an assistant commissioner at the Metropolitan Police and was promoted to deputy commissioner by the end of the year.

All three officers were either appointed or promoted by Dame Cressida and were seen as her key lieutenants

All three officers were either appointed or promoted by Dame Cressida and were seen as her key lieutenants

Incoming commissioner, Sir Mark, said: ‘Sir Steve should be extremely proud of his record as a police leader. His influence has left an enduring mark on policing not just in London but far beyond.

‘I am grateful for his stewardship of the Met over the recent turbulent months and know his priority has always been the safety of Londoners.’

The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, said: ‘I want to thank Sir Steve House for his decades of public service. He has served London in a number of key roles at the Met – including as acting commissioner – and played an important role in the significant success we have made in driving down violence and making our communities safer.

‘I wish Sir Steve the very best in his new role.’

Ms Ball joined the force in 1987 but left in 2010 for Thames Valley Police as assistant chief constable.

Today, Sir Mark Rowley said he was grateful 'to be given the opportunity to build a fresh leadership team'

Today, Sir Mark Rowley said he was grateful ‘to be given the opportunity to build a fresh leadership team’

She later returned to work in counter-terrorism policing before taking on a strategic leadership advisor role at the College of Policing.

Mr Ephgrave will undertake a secondment to the National Police Chiefs’ Council where he will lead the criminal justice portfolio.

He began his career at the Metropolitan Police but moved to become chief constable of Surrey Police in late 2015.

In 2019, he returned to the Metropolitan Police as an assistant commissioner.

Sir Mark added: ‘Both Helen and Nick are formidable leaders of the utmost integrity who have dedicated their careers to public service.

‘I wish Helen all the very best in her retirement and am delighted that Nick will bring his wealth of experience from more than three decades of policing to this important work on delivering better outcomes for victims of crime.

‘I am grateful to be given the opportunity to build a fresh leadership team to take the Met forward.’

Applications for the assistant commissioner position close on August 29, with the role described as ‘one of the toughest but most rewarding jobs in policing’.

Dame Cressida stepped down from her role as commissioner after criticism over her handling of racist, misogynist and homophobic messages shared by a group of officers based at Charing Cross police station and following a series of other scandals.

The Met’s reputation has been left in tatters by a series of disturbing cases including the rape and murder of Sarah Everard by a serving police officer; two constables who shared pictures of the bodies of murder victims Nicole Smallman and Bibaa Henry on WhatsApp and an inspectorate report that revealed 2,000 warrant cards have gone missing.

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