Tiny Hearts Education founder reveals why you should never ice bumps, bruises and burns on babies

Paramedic: Why you should never use bags of frozen peas or vegetables to treat bumps, bruises or burns on young children

  • A former paramedic has warned parents not to use frozen peas to treat bumps
  • Nikki Jurcutz said bags of frozen veggies can cause damage to babies’ tissue
  • The mum-of-two said freezer items can get a low as 0C and cause frostbite
  • She recommended covering frozen items with a towel or using a soft gel pack

A former paramedic has warned parents why putting a bag of frozen peas or vegetables directly on babies’ and young children’s skin to sooth a bump, bruise or burn is a bad idea. 

Nikki Jurcutz, founder of Tiny Hearts Education, said freezer items can cause damage and even frostbite on ‘delicate’ skin in a video posted to Instagram.

The mum-of-two instead recommended always covering frozen items in a dish towel to create a barrier or using a gel pack with a soft exterior that doesn’t get too cold. 

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Mum-of-two and former paramedic Nikki Jurcutz (left) has warned parents against using bags of frozen peas or vegetables to treat bumps, bruises and burns on babies

She said said freezer items can cause damage and even frostbite on 'delicate' skin in an Instagram video

Mum-of-two and former paramedic Nikki Jurcutz (left) has warned parents against using bags of frozen peas or vegetables to treat bumps, bruises and burns on babies

The mum-of-two instead recommended always covering frozen items in a dish towel to create a barrier or using a gel pack with a soft exterior that doesn't get too cold

The mum-of-two instead recommended always covering frozen items in a dish towel to create a barrier or using a gel pack with a soft exterior that doesn’t get too cold

‘WAIT! Before you reach for the pack of frozen peas and corn, make sure that you aren’t putting something that’s icy cold onto delicate skin!⁠’ she captioned the clip. 

She said freezer items are usually below zero degrees and can cause damage to fragile tissue, sometimes even leading to frostbite if held on the skin for too long. 

‘Instead always use a soft barrier such as a cloth or a towel,’ Nikki advised adding parents can also buy gel packs with a soft exterior that doesn’t get too cold and can be held directly on the skin. 

She said freezer items are usually below zero degrees and can cause damage to fragile tissue and sometimes even lead to frostbite if held on the skin for too long

'Instead always use a soft barrier such as a cloth or a towel,' Nikki advised adding parents can also buy gel packs with a soft exterior that doesn't get too cold and can be held directly on the skin

Freezer items can get as low as zero degrees and cause damage to fragile tissue if held on the skin for too long. Nikki recommended a gel pack with a soft exterior that doesn’t get too cold

The video received more than 262,000 views and dozens of comments from thankful parents one of whom said their own child had experienced burns from an injury being treated with ice.

‘When my son went into SVT at eight weeks old they (ED) put ice directly onto his face, he had burns for weeks. (Also, didn’t even revert),’ she said. 

Others shared their own advice with many saying they keep gel packs in the fridge rather than the freezer so they don’t get too cold.  

‘In first aid, we were taught never to put a frozen icepack (straight from freezer) on forehead or head and only a wet cold compress,’ another viewer recommended. 

How long should you ice an injury? 

Icing an injury can help reduce swelling and pain. Still, there are limits to how long you should keep ice on an injured body part. 

When you injure a body part, your body goes through the inflammatory process. This helps heal the tissue. 

Hallmarks of inflammation include:

  • Increased tissue temperature 
  • Redness
  • Pain 
  • Swelling 

Inflammation happens when your body sends blood and cells to the injured part to help it heal. Swelling and pain happen as a result of this process. Ice can help control those symptoms.

When should you stop icing?

Ice should be applied to an injury for 10 minutes at a time. Longer applications may cause tissue damage. You can apply ice several times each day.

Ten minutes is a general guideline. You may not be able to tolerate the full 10 minutes. If you’re not sure when to stop, use the CBAN method of icing. CBAN stands for: Cold, Burn, Ache, Numb 

How to make you own ice pack 

Icing works best with a proper ice pack. If you don’t have an ice pack, you can make a refreezable one. Here’s how:

  1. Place ice cubes and a cup of water into a plastic bag.
  2. Add a few tablespoons of rubbing alcohol.
  3. Seal the bag. The alcohol will prevent the ice from forming a big block in the freezer.

When you apply the ice pack, make sure to put a layer or two of fabric, such as a towel, between the pack and your skin. This will protect you from frostbite.

Source: Very Well Health 

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