Tourists could be thrown in Bali JAILS for just a sip of Bintang under shock new law proposed

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Australian tourists could face time in Bali’s notorious hellhole jail for having just a sip of alcohol under draconian new laws.

Indonesia‘s House of Representatives has resumed deliberations of a proposed law that would ban the consumption of booze across the Islamic country.

Those caught producing, distributing, and storing alcohol in Indonesia could face jail terms of two to 10 years, and lesser penalties for consumption.

Twenty-one politicians from conservative Islamic parties cited the Koran when discussing the draft bill, with the religious text saying Muslims cannot drink alcohol.

Australian tourists could face time in Bali's notorious hellhole jail for having just a sip of alcohol under draconian new laws

Australian tourists could face time in Bali’s notorious hellhole jail for having just a sip of alcohol under draconian new laws

They could end up in the notorious Kerobokan jail, where Gold Coast drug smuggler Schapelle Corby was locked up for more than a decade

They could end up in the notorious Kerobokan jail, where Gold Coast drug smuggler Schapelle Corby was locked up for more than a decade

AA Ngurah Adi Ardhana, chairman of Bali’s regional legislative council, is staunchly against the proposed law.

‘It is too superficial; Bali will definitely reject it. We are a unitary state built on diversity, and the potential economic impact involved is unacceptable,’ he said.  

More than a million Australians travel to Indonesia each year and make up more than a quarter of Bali tourists – but this has dropped to zero during the pandemic.

As a result, more than 73,000 people have been furloughed and another 2,500 workers have lost their jobs in Bali due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Those caught producing, distributing, and storing alcohol in Indonesia could face jail terms of two to ten years. (Kerobokan prison in Denpasar)

Those caught producing, distributing, and storing alcohol in Indonesia could face jail terms of two to ten years. (Kerobokan prison in Denpasar)

The maximum security cells of Kerobokan prison, where many Australians have found themselves over the years

The maximum security cells of Kerobokan prison, where many Australians have found themselves over the years

Footage of the island shows busy markets completely empty and rows of scooters and tuk-tuks that would have once noisily battled for a place on the road parked silently to the side.

Hotels that would usually be booked out heading into summer are now sitting at just 10 per cent occupancy – with their gardens and pools in disrepair.

Western Australian man Jack Ahearn, who lives in Bali, posted a video of an abandoned hotel in the normally-thriving Kuta Beach precinct on Saturday. 

In the video, the hotel’s pool was full of leaves and the water had turned green from not being cleaned for months.  

More than a million Australians travel to Indonesia each year and make up more than a quarter of Bali tourists - and they all love to drink

More than a million Australians travel to Indonesia each year and make up more than a quarter of Bali tourists – and they all love to drink

Girls dance in one of Bali's nightclubs, showing how little the island would have if there was no booze

Girls dance in one of Bali’s nightclubs, showing how little the island would have if there was no booze

The camera then panned to the hotel lobby, which had been stripped bare of anything valuable with only litter, dirt and debris left behind.

While international borders are still closed, Bali reopened to domestic tourism on July 31, which saw regency revenue increase to $1.1million in August.

Foreign tourist arrivals in Indonesia slumped 89.22 percent year-on-year to 164,970 in August 2020. Meanwhile, Bali arrivals plunged 100 percent to 12.

The Indonesian government predicts $14 billion will be lost from tourism in 2020 and has introduced a $28 billion in fiscal stimulus to fight the downturn.

The camera then panned to the hotel lobby, which had been stripped bare of anything valuable with only litter, dirt and debris left behind

'This video is one of many hotels that are done and all trashed like this. It’s very sad,' Mr Ahearn captioned the post

The camera then panned to the hotel lobby, which had been stripped bare of anything valuable with only litter, dirt and debris left behind. ‘This video is one of many hotels that are done and all trashed like this. It’s very sad,’ Mr Ahearn captioned the post

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