Traffic returns to normal in post COVID-19 Australian cities except Melbourne

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Melbourne is the only city in Australia that has not returned to normal levels of traffic on the roads because of its harsh COVID-19 lockdown, new data reveals.

Foot and car traffic significantly plunged in all Australian cities in March as COVID-19 restrictions came were introduced.

Apple Data, which tracks mobility trends around the world, revealed only in the past two months have drivers slowly returned to the roads with restrictions now softened.

By June, most cities recorded a return to normalcy on the roads – cities like Perth and Brisbane had even higher numbers of cars on the roads compared to pre COVID-19.

Predictably, Melbourne has the worst figures in the country with its September numbers well below average and just as bad as they were seven months ago.   

Melbourne is the only city in Australia that has not returned to normal levels of car traffic as it battles through the harshest COVID-19 lockdown in the country, new data reveals (pictured, a quiet Western Ring Road and Tullamarine Freeway in Melbourne)

Melbourne is the only city in Australia that has not returned to normal levels of car traffic as it battles through the harshest COVID-19 lockdown in the country, new data reveals (pictured, a quiet Western Ring Road and Tullamarine Freeway in Melbourne)

Public transport has been the worst hit with 85 per cent less commuters catching a train or bus while 65 per cent less drivers are on the roads. 

The city has been locked in Stage Four restrictions since August with residents not allowed to leave their homes after 8pm and only one person allowed to shop for each household.  

Melbourne

Car and foot traffic and public transport figures drastically descended in mid March and reached the lowest figures in April.

Public transportation fell by a staggering 90 per cent while car and foot traffic dropped by 80 per cent.

Apple Data showed public transport, car and foot traffic in Melbourne are still well below average in September

Apple Data showed public transport, car and foot traffic in Melbourne are still well below average in September

More drivers slowly returned to the roads over the coming months as restrictions were softened in the states (pictured, drivers slowly returned to the roads in Sydney in June)

More drivers slowly returned to the roads over the coming months as restrictions were softened in the states (pictured, drivers slowly returned to the roads in Sydney in June)

All three modes of transport looked to be on the mend and the number of cars on the road almost returned to normal in June.

Though the figures slowly plunged again with the biggest drops recorded around the time stage four lockdown restrictions were introduced at Melbourne and Mitchell Shire in August.  

Photos from around the same time showed eerily empty freeways and streets with residents forced to stay in their homes during certain hours of the day. 

In September, buses and train drivers are transporting 85 per cent less commuters. 

Sixty-five per cent less drivers are taking to the roads while 58 per cent less people are walking. 

Sydney

Sydney began to experience a dip in public transport and car and foot traffic in mid March, before car traffic returned to normal around June

Sydney began to experience a dip in public transport and car and foot traffic in mid March, before car traffic returned to normal around June

Public transport, foot and car traffic figures dropped to their lowest in mid-April.

Public transport fell by almost 85 per cent and foot and car traffic dipped by around 70 per cent.

The roads were on their way to relative normalcy by June with car traffic slowly increasing. 

Though foot traffic and public transport have remained well below the average into September.

Around 30 per cent less people are walking while 50 per cent less commuters are catching the train or bus.  

Brisbane

Brisbane recorded its lowest public transport, foot and car traffic figures in mid April.

Cities like Perth and Brisbane even recorded higher numbers of people driving on the road compared to pre COVID-19 (pictured, traffic at the Queensland border in March as COVID-19 panic and restrictions began to sink in)

Cities like Perth and Brisbane even recorded higher numbers of people driving on the road compared to pre COVID-19 (pictured, traffic at the Queensland border in March as COVID-19 panic and restrictions began to sink in)

Public transport, foot and car traffic have slowly been recovering in Brisbane over the last few months with buses and trains still suffering the most

Public transport, foot and car traffic have slowly been recovering in Brisbane over the last few months with buses and trains still suffering the most

Public transport fell by almost 85 per cent while foot and car traffic dipped by almost 65 per cent.

The number of cars on the road slowly returned to normal by mid June.

Car traffic figures reached its year high peak of 25 per cent in mid July. 

Foot traffic and public transport figures still remain below average with almost 20 per cent less people on the footpaths and almost 50 per cent less commuters on trains and buses. 

Perth 

Public transport and foot and car traffic all dived in mid-March and reached their lowest points by mid April.

Car and foot traffic plummeted by 65 per cent while the public sector took the biggest hit with a 85 per cent plunge. 

Melbourne has been locked in Stage Four restrictions since August with residents not allowed to leave their homes after 8pm and only one person allowed to shop for each household (pictured, an empty Dandenong Road in Melbourne in August)

Melbourne has been locked in Stage Four restrictions since August with residents not allowed to leave their homes after 8pm and only one person allowed to shop for each household (pictured, an empty Dandenong Road in Melbourne in August)

Both car and foot traffic slowly recovered over the ensuing months with both modes of transport returning to baseline by mid June.

Car traffic peaked in September with 40 per cent more vehicles on the road.  

Public transport remains well below baseline with 50 per cent less commuters using the system. 

Adelaide

All three modes of transport began their descent in mid March and bottomed out in mid April.

Car and foot traffic fell by almost 70 per cent and public transport plummeted by 80 per cent. 

Public transport figures still remain below baseline with almost a 20 per cent dip in commuters.

Car and foot traffic sit just above baseline.  

Apple Data does not provide mobility tracking for Darwin, Canberra or Hobart. 

Source


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