Tullamore NSW: A five-year-child is missing after two cars were washed away in flood

A five-year-child is missing and four people are rescued after two cars were washed away in floodwaters caused by severe east coast downpour

  • Five-year-old child missing after four people rescued at Tullamore, NSW
  • The four were found clinging to trees after two cars were submerged in water
  • They were transported to hospital as desperate search for the child continues 

A desperate search is underway for a child missing after floodwaters engulfed two cars. 

The vehicles were trapped in rising water at McGrane Way Tullamore, north-west of Parkes, in the central west of NSW shortly before 8pm on Friday night.

Emergency services found four people found clinging to trees as the water surged around their vehicles. 

The NSW SES retrieved the stranded travellers in boats. 

After they were rescued, the four people were transported to Dubbo Hospital but a five-year-old child remains missing.

‘The two vehicles remain submerged in floodwaters and police will remain onsite and wait until they can access the vehicles,’ NSW police said in a statement.

The vehicles were trapped in rising water at McGrane Way Tullamore, north-west of Parkes, in the central west of NSW shortly before 8pm on Friday night

The vehicles were trapped in rising water at McGrane Way Tullamore, north-west of Parkes, in the central west of NSW shortly before 8pm on Friday night

Traffic negotiates a wet road in northern NSW after heavy rain caused flash flooding in the north and central west of the state, and in south-east Queensland

Traffic negotiates a wet road in northern NSW after heavy rain caused flash flooding in the north and central west of the state, and in south-east Queensland

Floodwaters west of Condong near the town of Murwillumbah, NSW after a low-pressure storm system caused flooding across the state's inland

Floodwaters west of Condong near the town of Murwillumbah, NSW after a low-pressure storm system caused flooding across the state’s inland

On Thursday a four-year-old boy and two women were rescued by a police officer using just a rope and a winch after their vehicle became submerged in floodwaters in the NSW Hunter region.

Authorities were told three people had become trapped in a vehicle at a flooded causeway on Lyons Road at Bingleburra, west of the country town of Dungog, about 9.30am on Thursday.

The flash flooding resulted from a long storm front that brought heavy rain to many parts of Australia’s east coast, including parts northern and western NSW and more than 300mm on the northern end of the Gold Coast.

Flood warnings remain current in inland NSW and south-east Queensland after the weather system moved offshore but waters continue to rise. 

It’s the fourth time this year that many areas have experienced inundation after heavy falls associated with the La Nina event.

In the town of Gunnedah, home to 9,000 people, the Namoi River passed major flood levels, reaching the 7.9 metre mark late on Friday night and expected to peak at 8.3m on Saturday morning.

At Wee Waa, just 120km northwest, floodwaters peaked at the Namoi on Thursday and are falling slowly, with the BOM predicting they will remain above major flood levels until next week.

Wee Waa, a cotton town, is protected by an 8km levee, however, Narrabri Shire mayor Ron Campbell told AAP the rainfall has destroyed local roads.

The scene of a rescue on Thursday near Dungog, NSW, where two women and a four-year-old were retrieved after their vehicle became submerged during a flash flood

The scene of a rescue on Thursday near Dungog, NSW, where two women and a four-year-old were retrieved after their vehicle became submerged during a flash flood

‘If we get substantial rain across the summer, we could have a record flood for sure – probably something not seen since the 1970s,’ Mr Campbell said.

The wet weather had caused huge anxiety for the Tumbulgum community on the Tweed River, as locals saw the river burst its banks on to their paddocks on Friday.

Many locals remained hyper vigilant after major flooding hit the region earlier this year, Husk Distillers co-owner Harriet Messenger told AAP.

‘Everybody in the region is always very on edge – particularly so close to another major event,’ she said.

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