Two men accused of stabbing Omani sheikh’s son outside Harrods will stand trial for murder in July

Two men accused of stabbing a sheikh’s son to death outside Harrods for his expensive Rolex watch will stand trial in July, a court heard.

Mohammed Al-Araimi, 20, was killed in a mugging near the famous Knightsbridge department store on December 5, 2019.

The Kings College student, a son of the Omani sheikh Abdalla Al Araimi, had been out for a meal with a friend when they were approached by two men.

The pair allegedly tried to snatch his luxury Rolex before attacking him and fleeing the scene.

Police have said the value of the Rolex was between £45,000 and £120,000.

Badir Rahim Alnazi, 24, and Arseboon Dilbaro, 22, were due to stand trial for murder at Inner London Crown Court this week.

However the case has now been put back until July.

Mohammed Al-Araimi, 20, was killed in a mugging near to the famous Knightsbridge department store on December 5, 2019

Mohammed Al-Araimi, 20, was killed in a mugging near to the famous Knightsbridge department store on December 5, 2019

Alnazi, of Beaconsfield Road, Brent and Dilbaro, of Green Avenue, Mill Hill, both deny murder.

They also deny grievous bodily harm with intent and threatening a person with a blade in a public place.

Dilbaro also denies attempted robbery. The trial has now been put back until July.

Mr Al-Armani was second-year King’s College student, who lived in London while studying politics and economics.

He is the son of Sheikh Abdullah Al-Araimi who runs a property empire and owns a number of apartments in London.

The family are said to be close to Oman’s ruling dynasty.

Sheikh Abdullah Al-Araimi is the founder of the Al Raid Group – the company behind the glitzy £130million Al Araimi Boulevard shopping area which opened in Muscat in 2018. 

It was reportedly modelled on the Westfield London centre in Shepherd’s Bush.  

Mr Al-Armani was second-year King's College student, who lived in London while studying politics and economics.

Mr Al-Armani was second-year King’s College student, who lived in London while studying politics and economics.

Mr Al-Armani’s family released statement following his death in 2019.

His brother Salem Abdullah Al Araimi said: ‘While going about our daily lives in Muscat, we had little idea of the tragic and unexpected events unfolding in London that have irreversibly changed the course of our family’s lives.’

He added: ‘Our hearts are eternally broken.’ 

In a statement following his death, King’s College paid tribute to Mr Al-Armani, saying:  ‘Mohamed is remembered by many as being a very kind-hearted person who cared greatly for others, including his friends, family, teachers and fellow students.’

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