Tyga removes Ay Caramba video after apologizing to the Mexican American community for stereotypes

Tyga removes his Ay Caramba video after apologizing to the Mexican American community for its use of stereotypes: ‘I had no intentions of offending anybody’

  • Tyga, 32, was criticized for stereotypes of Mexican Americans in Ay Caramba
  • The rapper apologized for portrayals in a Power 106 discussion on Thursday
  • As of Friday afternoon, the video had been made private on YouTube
  • He appears in a fat suit and with a mariachi band in the video 

Tyga has removed his new Ay Caramba video just weeks after releasing in after issuing an apology to the Mexican American community.

During a chat with Los Angeles‘ Power 106 FM from Thursday, the 32-year-old rapper admitted that some of his ‘Mexican fans’ were ‘offended’ by the video.

The now-deleted video had featured Tyga (born Micheal Stevenson) in several costumes that some viewers accused of being racist.

Responding to criticism: Tyga, 32, took his recent Ay Caramba music video of YouTube on Friday after he was accused of using racist caricatures in it. He apologized to the Mexican American community during a chat with LA's Power 106 FM on Thursday (pictured)

Responding to criticism: Tyga, 32, took his recent Ay Caramba music video of YouTube on Friday after he was accused of using racist caricatures in it. He apologized to the Mexican American community during a chat with LA’s Power 106 FM on Thursday (pictured)

Tyga admitted in the conversation with Gil Tejada, host of the American Cholo podcast, that he was initially ‘confused’ by the negative reactions to his Ay Caramba video.

However, he made it clear that he was now sympathetic to the many complaints about alleged racist caricatures. 

‘I had no intentions of offending anybody… I want to apologize to the Mexican community, and my fans that are Mexican,’ he said. 

Tyga explained that, ‘I have a lot of Latin fans that are Puerto Rican, Dominican, that probably weren’t offended by this video, but my Mexican fans in LA, there definitely was some that were offended.’

Airing it out: Tyga admitted in the conversation with Gil Tejada, host of the American Cholo podcast, that he was initially 'confused' by the negative reactions to his video

Change of heart: However, he made it clear that he was now sympathetic to the many complaints about alleged racist caricatures

Airing it out: Tyga admitted in the conversation with Gil Tejada, host of the American Cholo podcast, that he was initially ‘confused’ by the negative reactions to his Ay Caramba video. However, he made it clear that he was now sympathetic to the many complaints about alleged racist caricatures

Sorry: 'I had no intentions of offending anybody… I want to apologize to the Mexican community, and my fans that are Mexican,' he said

Sorry: ‘I had no intentions of offending anybody… I want to apologize to the Mexican community, and my fans that are Mexican,’ he said

Absurd: The video opens with Tyga wearing a fat suit with prosthetics. Some viewers criticized the character, who was eating tortilla chips dipped into a massive bowl of guacamole

Absurd: The video opens with Tyga wearing a fat suit with prosthetics. Some viewers criticized the character, who was eating tortilla chips dipped into a massive bowl of guacamole

The video opens with Tyga wearing a fat suit with prosthetics. Some viewers criticized the character, who was eating tortilla chips dipped into a massive bowl of guacamole, though the rapper said the character was an homage to Eddie Murphy’s extreme use of prosthetics in The Nutty Professor remake.

‘I was really just confused, I wasn’t making this video to be offensive, I was really making this video to be creative,’ he explained. ‘The whole concept of the video was just different Latin things, it wasn’t like a Mexican-themed video.

‘The character is just me in a fat suit, the character is not even Mexican. This character was literally a reference from … Nutty Professor. There’s a scene from Nutty Professor where he has the same kind of sweat suit on.’

After Gil explained that viewers could still find his characters offensive, even if it wasn’t his intention to offend, and the rapper explained that he was just trying to be ‘funny.’

‘With this video I can understand now where you’re coming from,’ he said. ‘It was meant to be a funny video, but not make fun of.’

Clarifying: The rapper said the character was an homage to Eddie Murphy's extreme use of prosthetics in The Nutty Professor remake

Clarifying: The rapper said the character was an homage to Eddie Murphy’s extreme use of prosthetics in The Nutty Professor remake

Suited up: In addition to his overweight guacamole-loving character, Tyga also appears as the host of a dance show in an orange zoot suit with an extremely wide-brimmed blue hat

Suited up: In addition to his overweight guacamole-loving character, Tyga also appears as the host of a dance show in an orange zoot suit with an extremely wide-brimmed blue hat

Cartoonish: Later, Tyga is dressed as a cowboy in red with another oversize hat and a ridiculously long red mustache to match his red eyebrows

Cartoonish: Later, Tyga is dressed as a cowboy in red with another oversize hat and a ridiculously long red mustache to match his red eyebrows

In addition to his overweight guacamole-loving character, Tyga also appears as the host of a dance show in an orange zoot suit with an extremely wide-brimmed blue hat.

Although the zoot suit was popular with a number of ethnic minorities in the 1930s and ’40s, including African Americans, Latin Americans and Italian Americans, it is strongly associated with Mexican Americans, who were assaulted by American servicemen — along with members of other minorities who wore the suits — in Los Angeles’ 1943 Zoot Suit Riots.

Later, Tyga is dressed as a cowboy in red with another oversize hat and a ridiculously long red mustache to match his red eyebrows.

He also dresses up in a matador’s outfit while surrounded by a mariachi band, and he dresses in a white Western-style suit as a used car salesman.

Stereotypes: He dresses up in a matador's outfit while surrounded by a mariachi band

Stereotypes: He dresses up in a matador’s outfit while surrounded by a mariachi band

Selling something: Tyga also dresses in a white Western-style suit as a used car salesman

Selling something: Tyga also dresses in a white Western-style suit as a used car salesman

Later in the discussion, Gil asked Tyga if he would be willing to remove the allegedly offensive video, which he seemed receptive to.

‘If I feel like that’s right, then I don’t have a problem with that,’ he said, after explaining that he was thinking over the issue.

The Rack City rapper seems to have been convinced, though, as the video was no longer available on YouTube as of Friday afternoon. 

After the takedown, Gil took his podcast’s Instagram account to salute Tyga for acting on the criticism. 

‘Shout out to @tyga For Not just acknowledging us and our Grievances, but for actually putting his money where his mouth and taking the video down from his IG and YouTube page, we need to show this man all the love and respect he deserves [clapping emoji] …COMMUNICATION IS KEY in any relationship….our voice is our power,’ he wrote.

Taking action: Tyga said he was considering removing the video, and he followed through by taking it down as of Friday afternoon

Taking action: Tyga said he was considering removing the video, and he followed through by taking it down as of Friday afternoon

Thumbs up: After the takedown, Gil took his podcast's Instagram account to salute Tyga for acting on the criticism

Thumbs up: After the takedown, Gil took his podcast’s Instagram account to salute Tyga for acting on the criticism

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