US mum realises she knows ‘nothing’ about Aussies after watching Bluey

Confused American mum makes a hilarious list of the ‘Aussie words she doesn’t understand’ after watching Bluey

  • A US mum admitted she knows ‘nothing’ about Australia after watching Bluey
  • Bluey is an Aussie kids show about a blue heeler dog and her adventures
  • Holly made a list of the ‘weird’ words that aren’t commonly used in the US
  • Some of the 21 words and phrases included ‘pavlova’, ‘budgie’, and ‘takeaway’

An American mum has openly admitted she knows ‘nothing’ about Australians after watching the popular children’s show Bluey. 

While watching the show with her baby, Holly, from Missouri, made a list of the ‘weird’ terms and phrases that aren’t commonly used in the US. 

From ‘Good on ya’ to ‘pavlova’, ‘budgie’, and ‘takeaway’, all Aussies instantly know what these words mean, but Holly was left scratching her head.

‘I am a young American momma and watching Bluey has made me realise something – I know NOTHING about Australia,’ she wrote on Facebook and posted a screenshot of the list. 

‘I have made a list on my phone if things that don’t make sense to me in Bluey.’ 

After watching the popular Aussie kids show Bluey, American mum-of-one Holly realised she knew 'nothing' about Australia. 'I have made a list on my phone if things that don't make sense to me in Bluey,' Holly wrote on Facebook (pictured: the list)

After watching the popular Aussie kids show Bluey, American mum-of-one Holly realised she knew ‘nothing’ about Australia. ‘I have made a list on my phone if things that don’t make sense to me in Bluey,’ Holly wrote on Facebook (pictured: the list) 

Bluey is an animated Aussie kids show about a six-year-old blue heeler dog and her adventures - but even adults have come to enjoy watching the adorable program (Bluey pictured front and centre with her family)

Bluey is an animated Aussie kids show about a six-year-old blue heeler dog and her adventures – but even adults have come to enjoy watching the adorable program (Bluey pictured front and centre with her family) 

Bluey is an animated Aussie kids show about a six-year-old blue heeler dog and her adventures – but even adults have come to enjoy watching the adorable program.

The list included 21 words and phrases most Aussies used in everyday language.

First on the list was ‘good on yah’ meaning ‘well done’, followed by ‘dobber’, meaning a person who secretly tells someone when another person has done something wrong.

The list included 21 words and phrases most Aussies used in everyday language, including 'dodgy', 'rockmelon', and 'sat-nav'

The list included 21 words and phrases most Aussies used in everyday language, including ‘dodgy’, ‘rockmelon’, and ‘sat-nav’ 

Holly also had no idea what ‘dodgy’, ‘dunny’ or ‘rockmelon’ meant.

In the US ‘rockmelon’ fruit is known as cantaloupe and ‘dunny’ is an Australian slang term for toilet.

The word ‘dodgy’ is used Down Under when referring to something or someone that’s unreliable.

Some lesser known phrases included ‘Higglty pigglty’, meaning all over the place, and sat-nav, which is an abbreviation for ‘satellite navigation system’.

What do the Aussie words and phrases mean?

  • Good on ya = well done, good on you
  • Dobber = snitch/someone who tells on someone else
  • How yah going? = How are you going today?
  • Love Heart = heart-shaped emoji or heart hands 
  • Poinciana tree = a common tree in Australia
  • Sat-Nav = satellite navigation or Google maps
  • Sausage in a piece of bread with sauce = sausage sizzle  
  • Tomato sauce = ketchup
  • Pavlova = a type of cake
  • Takeaway = food to-go/take home food from a restaurant
  • Budgie = a type of bird
  • She’ll come good = it’ll be fine 
  • Barkie boats = a piece of bark off a tree floating in water as a boat 
  • Morning tea = a small snack mid-morning before lunch
  • Just banging it on 
  • Dodgy = unreliable
  • Dunny = toilet 
  • Higglety Pigglety = all over the place
  • Rockmelon = cantaloupe  
  • Windscreen = the large window you look out in your car

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After sharing the list to the Bluey Mums Facebook group Aussie parents offered an explanation to each word. 

‘Omg as an Aussie, I love this list,’ one mum wrote, anther said: ‘Wait…. there’s people who dont know what a love heart is’.

A third said: ‘I’m in the UK, most of the words I get but one thing that’s thrown me is what do Americans call a take away?’

One woman revealed it’s called either ‘carry out’ or ‘to-go’ in the US.

Source

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