Wisconsin surpasses 2,000 COVID-19 deaths, more than 5,000 new cases confirmed – WBAY

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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – COVID-19 testing confirmed 5,278 new cases in Wisconsin, the third time this week — and the third time in the pandemic’s history — there were more than 5,000 new cases identified in Wisconsin in a 24-hour period. Saturday’s amount is a new record, beating this past Tuesday’s record of 5,262 new cases.

The new cases were part of 14,853 test results, the most received by the state in one day. The positivity rate — a key metric indicating the spread of the virus — was 35.53%. That means more than 1 in 4 tests came back positive. The percentage is higher than the 7-day average, which is at an all-time high of 30.60%.

More than 9,500 people tested negative.

Since February, more than 225,000 (225,370) coronavirus cases have been confirmed in Wisconsin. A week ago, the cumulative confirmed case number was at 194,540. That means nearly 31,000 new cases (30,830) were added within the past week.

CLICK HERE FOR STATEMENTS FROM GOV. TONY EVERS AND HEALTH SECRETARY-DESIGNEE ANDREA PALM.

DEATHS

The state’s death toll rose past the 2,000 mark, and sits at 2,031, an increase of 59 from Friday. With the high number of new cases, the death rate is holding steady at 0.90% of all people diagnosed with coronavirus in Wisconsin. The rate had risen twice earlier in the week. The state is averaging 37 deaths a day throughout the past week.

New deaths were reported in Adams, Brown, Calumet, Chippewa, Dodge, Door, Eau Claire, Fond du Lac, Green, Iowa, Jefferson, Juneau, Kenosha, Marathon, Marinette, Milwaukee, Monroe, Oconto, Outagamie, Racine, Sawyer, Sheboygan, Trempealeau, Washington, Waupaca and Winnebago Counties. Douglas County revised their death county by one.

County-by-county case numbers are listed later in this article.

ACTIVE CASES

With so many new positive tests, the percentage of active cases increased again, although slightly, from 21.3% to 21.4%. Thursday’s percentage was 20.9%. There are 48,208 people who were diagnosed in the past 30 days and haven’t been medically cleared. More than 1 in 5 people who ever tested positive for the coronavirus in Wisconsin since February were diagnosed this month.

The remaining 175,096 people who tested positive are considered recovered, or 77.7%, down from Friday’s percentage of 77.8% of known cases.

HOSPITALIZATIONS

The Department of Health Services reports another 229 people were hospitalized in the past 24 hours. Since February, 11,374 people diagnosed with COVID-19 have been hospitalized because of serious symptoms.

The percentage of people diagnosed with the COVID-19 virus who were hospitalized decreased slightly from 5.1% to 5.0%.

There are currently 11 patients at the alternate care facility (ACF) field hospital at the Wisconsin State Fair Park near Milwaukee, three more than Friday. The facility helps the state’s hospitals make room for more serious patients by receiving patients who are closer to discharge but not quite ready, such as patients who can walk on their own but still need oxygen. To protect patient privacy, the DHS doesn’t say where patients are from. The ACF is funded by the federal CARES Act and there’s no charge to patients or their insurance for their care and transport to and from their local hospital.

HOSPITAL READINESS – will be updated as new numbers are reported later in the day.

The WHA reports 10.8% of state’s ICU beds are open right now, or 159 ICU beds among 134 hospitals. Overall, the state says 14% of all licensed medical beds are open.

In the eight-county Fox Valley region, there are 9 ICU beds open in the 13 hospitals there, and 8.8% of all beds are open. Those are slight improvements from Thursday. The hospitals are caring for 150 COVID-19 patients with 21 of them in ICU. Eight of the 13 hospitals say they have less than a week’s supply of gowns available.

The seven-county Northeast region has 12 ICU beds open at its 10 hospitals, and 17.6% of all beds. That’s 7 fewer ICU beds than Thursday but a slight improvement for all beds. Those hospitals are caring for 167 COVID-19 patients, 51 in ICU.

Day-to-day changes take hospital discharges and deaths into account.

NEW COMMUNITY TEST SITES

Gov. Tony Evers and DHS Secretary-designee Andrea Palm announced expanded community testing for COVID-19 on Thursday.

Seventy-one new community test sites will open by the end of the week for testing through December 10. Once they’re all open, 56 counties and 7 tribal nations will have regular testing sites. Anyone who lives or works in Wisconsin can get tested. Although you can register at the test site, you’re encouraged to register ahead of time at the COVID Connect web site. Each site will be staffed by Wisconsin National Guard members and local site managers.

CLICK HERE for the list of testing sites by county.

Evers and Palm say each new site is able to open through a partnership with local and tribal health departments, the Wisconsin National Guard, the State of Wisconsin Emergency Operations Center and county and tribal emergency management, and the Healthcare Emergency Readiness Coalition.

SATURDAY’S COUNTY NUMBERS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold)*

Wisconsin

  • Adams – 576 cases (+14) (5 deaths)(+1)
  • Ashland – 300 cases (+9) (3 deaths)
  • Barron – 1,281 cases (+58) (7 deaths)
  • Bayfield – 266 cases (+10) (2 deaths)
  • Brown – 16,115 cases (+132) (103 deaths) (+2)
  • Buffalo – 330 cases (+21) (3 deaths)
  • Burnett – 327 cases (+7) (6 deaths)
  • Calumet – 2,818 cases (+46) (14 deaths)(+3)
  • Chippewa – 1,939 cases (+74) (24 deaths) (+3)
  • Clark – 998 cases (+36) (17 deaths)
  • Columbia – 1,908 cases (+45) (7 deaths)
  • Crawford – 37cases (+7) (1 death)
  • Dane – 15,839 cases (+318) (49 deaths)
  • Dodge – 4,683 cases (+230) (35 deaths) (+7)
  • Door – 925 cases (+29) (9 deaths) (+1)
  • Douglas – 841 cases (+21) (1 death)(State revised report, decrease of one)
  • Dunn – 1,177 cases (+47) (1 death)
  • Eau Claire – 3,845 cases (+107) (17 deaths)(+1)
  • Florence – 221 cases (+5) (7 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 4,994 cases (+177) (23 deaths)(+3)
  • Forest – 501 cases (+7) (11 deaths)
  • Grant – 2,018 cases (+44) (34 deaths)
  • Green – 1,030 cases (+31) (6 deaths)(+1)
  • Green Lake – 798 cases (+13) (4 deaths)
  • Iowa – 560 cases (+37) (2 deaths)(+1)
  • Iron – 212 cases (+4) (4 deaths)
  • Jackson – 591 cases (+27) (1 death)
  • Jefferson – 2,951 cases (+71) (19 deaths)(+4)
  • Juneau – 837 cases (+13) (5 deaths)(+1)
  • Kenosha – 5,378 cases (+57) (88 deaths)(+5)
  • Kewaunee – 1,160 cases (+38) (7 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 4,550 cases (+77) (22 deaths)
  • Lafayette – 589 case (+13) (1 death)
  • Langlade – 1,065 cases (+20) (11 deaths)
  • Lincoln – 931 cases (+59) (12 deaths)
  • Manitowoc – 2,986 cases (+35) (16 deaths)
  • Marathon – 5,322 cases (+195) (57 deaths)(+3)
  • Marinette – 1,870 cases (+62) (16 deaths)(+2)
  • Marquette – 668 cases (+21) (2 deaths)
  • Menominee – 340 cases (+8)
  • Milwaukee – 42,864 (+932) (592 deaths)(+7)
  • Monroe – 1,238 cases (+38) (8 deaths) (+1)
  • Oconto – 2,238 cases (+42) (18 deaths)(+1)
  • Oneida – 1,351 cases (+24) (13 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 9,750 cases (+158) (81 deaths) (+3)
  • Ozaukee – 2,492 cases (+72) (25 deaths)
  • Pepin – 170 cases (+8)
  • Pierce – 792 cases (+27) (7 deaths)
  • Polk – 640 cases (+43) (3 deaths)
  • Portage – 2,978 cases (+74) (21 deaths)
  • Price – 408 cases (+26) (3 deaths)
  • Racine – 8,110 cases (+221) (114 deaths)(+1)
  • Richland – 497 cases (+9) (9 deaths)
  • Rock – 5,533 cases (+125) (46 deaths)
  • Rusk – 241 cases (+9) (1 death)
  • Sauk – 1,927 cases (+43) (7 deaths)
  • Sawyer – 417 cases (+17) (4 deaths)(+1)
  • Shawano – 2,629 cases (+60) (26 deaths)
  • Sheboygan – 5,158 cases (+148) (31 deaths) (+2)
  • St. Croix – 2,055 cases (+81) (11 deaths)
  • Taylor – 537 cases (+14) (7 deaths)
  • Trempealeau – 1,123 cases (+22) (4 deaths)(+1)
  • Vernon – 538 cases (+10) (2 deaths)
  • Vilas – 638 cases (+26) (7 deaths)
  • Walworth – 3,589 cases (+87) (39 deaths)
  • Washburn – 263 cases (+2) (2 deaths)
  • Washington – 4,809 cases (+88) (44 deaths) (+1)
  • Waukesha – 13,353 cases (+313) (125 deaths)
  • Waupaca – 2,586 cases (+67) (47 deaths)(+3)
  • Waushara – 1,091 cases (+26) (5 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 9,323 cases (+158) (67 deaths) (+1)
  • Wood – 1,917 cases (+83) (10 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula**

  • Alger – 91 cases (1 death)
  • Baraga – 105 cases (+9) (4 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 101 cases (+4)
  • Delta – 1,244 cases (+63) (30 deaths)(+2)
  • Dickinson – 738 cases (+38) (20 deaths)
  • Gogebic – 329 cases (+12) (3 deaths)
  • Houghton – 822 cases (+9) (8 deaths)
  • Iron – 444 cases (+10) (23 deaths)(+1)
  • Keweenaw – 21 cases(+2)
  • Luce – 57 cases (+4)
  • Mackinac – 135 cases (+4)
  • Marquette – 1,089 cases (+48) (16 deaths)(+1)
  • Menominee – 691 cases (+17) (6 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 110 cases (+8) (1 death)(+1)
  • Schoolcraft – 95 cases (+9)

* Viewers have asked us why the state has different numbers than what’s reported on some county health department websites. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19 but would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

Health experts say face masks are still the most effective way the general public can slow the spread of the coronavirus, but only if the masks are worn appropriately — over the nose and chin. County and state health officials are reminding and urging people to stay home when they feel sick, avoid large gatherings, and distance yourself six feet from people who aren’t from your household.

To help people understand how their decisions affect their own health and others, the Department of Health Services has a decision tool at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/decision.htm. The tool describes how choices matter and offers suggestions to make activities safer.

Copyright 2020 WBAY. All rights reserved.

Copyright 2020 WBAY. All rights reserved.

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