Woke Jaguar Land Rover bosses ban the word ‘slave’


Woke Jaguar Land Rover bosses ban the word ‘slave’ from being used to describe dummy parts in UK factories after complaints by staff despite it being used by manufacturers worldwide for 120 YEARS

  • Staff at the car giant’s plant in Solihull must use ‘surrogates’ instead of ‘slave’
  • ‘Master’ and ‘slave’ are common terms when describing parts that work together
  • One worker said: ‘It’s as a result of a few voices making a fuss. No one here supports slavery. We just want to build great cars and go home’

Woke‘ Jaguar Land Rover has banned the use of the engineering term ‘slave’ in its main British factory, it was revealed today.

Staff at the car giant’s plant in Solihull near Birmingham will now have to use the word ‘surrogates‘ when referring to parts used in their vehicles.

For more than a century Land Rover and other engineering firms have used the terms ‘master’ and ‘slave’ to reference the relationship between components and parts. 

In a Land Rover one of the most common parts is called a ‘clutch slave cylinder’. The ‘master’ and ‘slave’ term is also used in electronic engineering on circuit boards and also in clocks.

Jaguar Land Rover has said the the decision to ban the word was made after it was ‘called for by our employees’ – but there has reportedly somewhat of a stir on the shop floor.

One worker told The Sun: ‘It’s just one more example of wokeism and it’s as a result of a few voices making a fuss. It’s so stupid because ‘slave’ in car making refers to a component that supports the function of another – “slave” and “master”. No one here supports slavery. We just want to build great cars and go home.’

Staff at the Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) plant at Solihull (pictured) have been banned from using the word 'slave' - a term used in engineering

Staff at the Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) plant at Solihull (pictured) have been banned from using the word ‘slave’ – a term used in engineering

Woke police officers open ‘ hate incident’ file after boy, 11, is called ‘shorty’ and ‘leprechaun’ 

Police opened a ‘hate incident’ file after a boy, aged 11, was called ‘shorty’. 

Officers in Wiltshire stepped in after the child, who was also called a ‘leprechaun’ was called names in the street in a ‘non-crime hate incident’. 

The latest example of police recording name-calling in such a way comes despite an Appeal Court ruling last December that the policy unlawfully interferes with the right to freedom of expression.

Wiltshire was named last year as the worst force in the country when it came to solving sex attacks, cracking just one in 140 rape cases. 

‘It beggars belief that one child calling another ‘shorty’ becomes a police matter,’ Josie Appleton, Director of freedom of speech group the Manifesto Club told The Sun

‘Recording ‘non-crimes’ takes the police into the dangerous territory of policing speech and everyday interactions.

‘The police created this dubious non-crime hate incident system on their own initiative, and have been told by the Court of Appeal and Home Secretary to scrap it. 

‘It’s high time they did.’

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Calling the fattest category of people ‘morbidly’ obese is offensive, woke researchers said earlier this month.

And they urged doctors and scientists to stop referring to unsuccessful attempts to lose weight as ‘failures’.

Terms used moving forward should include ‘ineffective’ or ‘insufficient’ weight loss, or even ‘secondary weight regain’.

And in schools gury has risen over a ‘woke’ call to cancel traditional terms like ‘Sir’ and ‘Miss’ in schools in favour of using gender-neutral terms such as ‘teacher’ instead.

In a session funded by the National Education Union (NEU) in February, Dr Elly Barnes told teachers they ought to be moving towards a ‘gender-free model’ in education.

In April Google launched an ‘inclusive language’ function designed to avoid the use of politically incorrect words.

Users typing ‘landlord’ will see a warning that it ‘may not be inclusive to all readers’ with the suggestion they should try ‘property owner’ or ‘proprietor’ instead.

The word ‘humankind’ is a suggested alternative to what the online giant apparently sees as the controversial term ‘mankind’.

Gender specific terms such as ‘policemen’ or ‘housewife’ should also be replaced by ‘police officers’ and ‘stay-at-home spouse’, according to the new Google Document style programme. It is now being rolled out to what the firm calls enterprise-level users.

Many computer document systems use methods to correct spelling and grammar. 

But nudging users towards woke language is being seen by critics as a step too far. Tests on the system have also thrown up major flaws.

A transcribed interview with ex Klu Klux Klan leader David Duke, in which he uses offensive racial slurs and talks about hunting black people, prompted no warnings.

But it suggested President John F Kennedy’s inaugural address should say ‘for all humankind’ instead of ‘for all mankind’.

Users typing ‘landlord’ will see a warning that it ‘may not be inclusive to all readers’ with the suggestion they should try ‘property owner’ or ‘proprietor’ instead

Users typing ‘landlord’ will see a warning that it ‘may not be inclusive to all readers’ with the suggestion they should try ‘property owner’ or ‘proprietor’ instead

Many computer document systems use methods to correct spelling and grammar. But nudging users towards woke language is being seen by critics as a step too far. Tests on the system have also thrown up major flaws

Many computer document systems use methods to correct spelling and grammar. But nudging users towards woke language is being seen by critics as a step too far. Tests on the system have also thrown up major flaws

Silkie Carlo, of campaign group Big Brother Watch, told the Sunday Telegraph: ‘Google’s new word warnings aren’t assistive, they’re deeply intrusive.

‘This speech-policing is profoundly clumsy, creepy and wrong, often reinforcing bias.’

Sam Bowman, of online magazine Works in Progress, said: ‘It feels pretty hectoring and adds an unwanted political/cultural slant to what I’d rather was a neutral product [as] a user.’ 

A Google spokesman said: ‘Our technology is always improving, and we don’t yet [have] a solution to identifying and mitigating all unwanted word associations and biases.’

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